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NEWS
November 1, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders and Paul Richter, Tribune Washington Bureau
JERUSALEM - A decision by the U.N.'s cultural organization to admit the Palestinian Authority as a member state set off a confrontation between the United States and the United Nations, threatening to strip Washington of influence in several key international agencies, while cutting off a major source of contributions to the world body. The Obama administration said it would cut off funding for the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization just hours after the group voted 107-14 Monday to accept the Palestinian Authority as a full member.
NEWS
January 19, 1986 | By Steve Twomey, Inquirer Staff Writer
The United States got a lot done at UNESCO in 1985. And it wasn't even around. Didn't even have an office in the place anymore. One year after President Reagan pulled his country out of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization to protest the organization's allegedly unchecked bureaucracy and Third-World tilt, diplomats from a range of nations agree that the shock of the loss of UNESCO's biggest financial supporter sobered...
NEWS
October 6, 2011 | By Bradley Klapper, ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic - The Obama administration warned the U.N. cultural agency to stay out of the question of Palestinian statehood or face the consequences, as American lawmakers were threatening to withhold tens of millions of dollars in U.S. funding if the organization agrees to admit Palestine as a member before an Israeli-Palestinian peace deal is reached. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton called UNESCO's deliberation "inexplicable" at a time when the Palestinian bid for U.N. recognition and membership was being examined by the Security Council, the global body's top decision-making organ.
NEWS
October 27, 1996 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Wouldn't it be nice, in this era of federal cutbacks in culture, science and education, if there were a world organization devoted to improving all three, ready to step in and work on them with America? Actually, there is: UNESCO, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, launched in 1945 and based in Paris. The most powerful cultural organization in the world, with 185 member states and an annual budget in the hundreds of millions, UNESCO had its founding belief stated by American poet Archibald MacLeish in its constitution: "Since wars begin in the minds of men, it is in the minds of men that the defenses of peace must be constructed.
NEWS
November 1, 2011
PARIS - Palestine won its greatest-ever international endorsement yesterday, full membership in UNESCO, but the move will cost the agency one-fifth of its funding. In a dramatic session at the Paris-based United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, there were cheers for "yes" votes and grumbles for the "no's" and abstentions. But the jubilation was quickly pierced by reality: The United States said it wouldn't make a $60 million payment to fill out its contributions for this year and would suspend all future funding.
NEWS
June 27, 2011
Christiane Desroches Noblecourt, 97, a pioneering French Egyptologist who prodded Gen. Gamal Abdel Nasser to help salvage Nubia's vaunted antiquities, died Thursday at a hospital in Epernay, east of Paris, where she had been taken after a recent stroke, said Anne Françoise, treasurer of a retirement home in the nearby town of Sezanne where Ms. Desroches Noblecourt lived the last few years. Born Nov. 17, 1913, in Paris, she developed a passion for Egypt after reading about the discovery of King Tut's tomb in the early 1920s.
NEWS
February 21, 2000 | By Arlene Notoro Morgan
When I joined The Inquirer in 1969, only one woman worked on the news desk - the operation that decides what the paper looks like and where the stories are played. Of the dozen or so women on staff, I was one of two or three assigned to hard news. In those days, if you called a meeting of all the women running America's newspapers, the gathering would have fit in a closet. Today women are more of a force in managing U.S. newspapers. They are publishers and editors; they serve on major industry boards, and they have led the drive to figure out why the public trust of the media is so low. Of 889 members of the American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
NEW YORK - Have so many important people ever come so far for only 17 minutes of music? The Philadelphia Orchestra traveled two hours to the United Nations world headquarters here, where the 69th session of the General Assembly broke for a gala dinner Monday that featured orchestra members and the Philadelphia Singers Chorale performing Ode to Humanity by Chinese composer Wang Ning. Music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin arrived from Montreal to conduct. "The work we do in China is so unique," he said of the orchestra, "but it's hard to understand unless you've been there.
NEWS
February 5, 1986 | By Sydney J. Harris
The death earlier this year of my old friend and tutor, Richard McKeon, who was one of the great Greek and philosophy scholars of our time, reminded me of one of his few academic projects that came to naught. As a U.S. delegate to UNESCO in 1949, he was among six intellectuals serving on a committee that was assigned to compose an acceptable definition of "democracy. " After nearly a week of close study, proposals and debate, the committee was forced to disband, with the acknowledgment that an agreement could not be reached.
NEWS
November 12, 2001 | By ANNE APPLEBAUM
GENERALLY SPEAKING, the past two months have been good ones for leaders of large nation-states with relatively significant military capabilities. For multilateral institutions, on the other hand - U.N. or the European Union - they've been an unmitigated disaster. Where have they been? What on earth have they been doing? Let's just look at the U.N. Since Sept. 11, recent Nobel Peace Prize-winner Kofi Annan has politely hovered in the background, mumbling soothing words about world peace.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
NEW YORK - Have so many important people ever come so far for only 17 minutes of music? The Philadelphia Orchestra traveled two hours to the United Nations world headquarters here, where the 69th session of the General Assembly broke for a gala dinner Monday that featured orchestra members and the Philadelphia Singers Chorale performing Ode to Humanity by Chinese composer Wang Ning. Music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin arrived from Montreal to conduct. "The work we do in China is so unique," he said of the orchestra, "but it's hard to understand unless you've been there.
NEWS
November 1, 2011
PARIS - Palestine won its greatest-ever international endorsement yesterday, full membership in UNESCO, but the move will cost the agency one-fifth of its funding. In a dramatic session at the Paris-based United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, there were cheers for "yes" votes and grumbles for the "no's" and abstentions. But the jubilation was quickly pierced by reality: The United States said it wouldn't make a $60 million payment to fill out its contributions for this year and would suspend all future funding.
NEWS
November 1, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders and Paul Richter, Tribune Washington Bureau
JERUSALEM - A decision by the U.N.'s cultural organization to admit the Palestinian Authority as a member state set off a confrontation between the United States and the United Nations, threatening to strip Washington of influence in several key international agencies, while cutting off a major source of contributions to the world body. The Obama administration said it would cut off funding for the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization just hours after the group voted 107-14 Monday to accept the Palestinian Authority as a full member.
NEWS
October 6, 2011 | By Bradley Klapper, ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic - The Obama administration warned the U.N. cultural agency to stay out of the question of Palestinian statehood or face the consequences, as American lawmakers were threatening to withhold tens of millions of dollars in U.S. funding if the organization agrees to admit Palestine as a member before an Israeli-Palestinian peace deal is reached. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton called UNESCO's deliberation "inexplicable" at a time when the Palestinian bid for U.N. recognition and membership was being examined by the Security Council, the global body's top decision-making organ.
NEWS
June 27, 2011
Christiane Desroches Noblecourt, 97, a pioneering French Egyptologist who prodded Gen. Gamal Abdel Nasser to help salvage Nubia's vaunted antiquities, died Thursday at a hospital in Epernay, east of Paris, where she had been taken after a recent stroke, said Anne Françoise, treasurer of a retirement home in the nearby town of Sezanne where Ms. Desroches Noblecourt lived the last few years. Born Nov. 17, 1913, in Paris, she developed a passion for Egypt after reading about the discovery of King Tut's tomb in the early 1920s.
NEWS
January 14, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During volunteer archaeological work in Laos in 2007, retired businessman William F. Henderson came upon something more exotic than million-year-old pottery. Snake soup. "One of our Lao colleagues arrived one evening with a quite impressive snake, about seven feet long," he wrote. "When he removed the snake's head, there appeared to be another snake head inside. He began pulling it and withdrew a second snake that had been eaten whole. . . . "I did have some broth the next day that was pretty good," he wrote, but he did not ask whether the snakes had contributed to it. On Sunday, Mr. Henderson, 81, who for 18 years was a volunteer at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, died of lung cancer at his home in Glen Mills.
NEWS
November 12, 2001 | By ANNE APPLEBAUM
GENERALLY SPEAKING, the past two months have been good ones for leaders of large nation-states with relatively significant military capabilities. For multilateral institutions, on the other hand - U.N. or the European Union - they've been an unmitigated disaster. Where have they been? What on earth have they been doing? Let's just look at the U.N. Since Sept. 11, recent Nobel Peace Prize-winner Kofi Annan has politely hovered in the background, mumbling soothing words about world peace.
NEWS
February 21, 2000 | By Arlene Notoro Morgan
When I joined The Inquirer in 1969, only one woman worked on the news desk - the operation that decides what the paper looks like and where the stories are played. Of the dozen or so women on staff, I was one of two or three assigned to hard news. In those days, if you called a meeting of all the women running America's newspapers, the gathering would have fit in a closet. Today women are more of a force in managing U.S. newspapers. They are publishers and editors; they serve on major industry boards, and they have led the drive to figure out why the public trust of the media is so low. Of 889 members of the American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE)
NEWS
October 27, 1996 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Wouldn't it be nice, in this era of federal cutbacks in culture, science and education, if there were a world organization devoted to improving all three, ready to step in and work on them with America? Actually, there is: UNESCO, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, launched in 1945 and based in Paris. The most powerful cultural organization in the world, with 185 member states and an annual budget in the hundreds of millions, UNESCO had its founding belief stated by American poet Archibald MacLeish in its constitution: "Since wars begin in the minds of men, it is in the minds of men that the defenses of peace must be constructed.
NEWS
March 11, 1994 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an effort to battle illiteracy worldwide, the University of Pennsylvania has teamed up with UNESCO to create an International Literacy Institute, to open on the Penn campus in September. The preliminary agreement to establish the institute was signed at the United Nations last Friday, Penn and UNESCO spokesmen said yesterday. The institute will be the world's first major university-based center for research, training and development of international literacy programs, according to Daniel Wagner, director of Penn's National Center on Adult Literacy.
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