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Unfinished Business

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SPORTS
March 28, 2011
WHEN YOUNGSTERS start playing basketball, they are told they need to play with a chip on their shoulder, prove to people that they are better than others think. The players at Ohio State seem to get that. At Kansas? Not quite sure. The Buckeyes' top two players, stung by Friday's 62-60 loss to Kentucky, said they will not enter the NBA draft and will return to Columbus. The six Jayhawks who have a decision to make? They're not sure. Ohio State's Jared Sullinger made it clear to the Columbus Dispatch that the loss is the reason he won't put himself in the draft.
SPORTS
March 4, 1995 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
Everyone said it was going to be easy. And that's exactly the way the Penn Quakers have made it look. They beat Brown last night at the Palestra, 85-55, to clinch their third straight Ivy League championship. With two minutes remaining, they started passing out the obligatory "Threepeat" T-shirts. They eventually cut down the nets. But by the time they got back to the locker room, the talk was mostly about unfinished business. So much for celebrations. "We'll probably enjoy it more after we're done," said Matt Maloney, one of five senior starters.
SPORTS
September 9, 1991 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
This is Terry Mulholland's September song. He pitched a three-hit shutout yesterday afternoon in the Astrodome as the Phillies beat Houston, 5-0. It was his second victory of the month. He has won 14 games. Only four pitchers in the National League have won more. He has pitched 198 2/3 innings. Only six pitchers have put in longer hours. And now, he says, it's time for the big socko finish. He'll have five more starts this season and is reminding himself to make the best of each and every one. "It's important for me to go out there and win ballgames, especially this month," he said.
SPORTS
July 18, 1988 | By MIKE KERN, Daily News Sports Writer
Each day, all across America, a budding athlete allows imagination to be an inspiration. He tucks a football under his arm, and dreams about becoming the next O.J. Simpson. Or he engages in some one-on-one hoops, and pretends he's Magic going up against Bird. Perhaps she stands over a 15-foot putt, and in her mind it's for the U.S. women's Open title. Yet it's safe to assume that not too many shout "stroke" over and over again through a megaphone, while visions of one day being a coxswain on an Olympic-bound boat dance in their heads.
NEWS
November 14, 2012 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Congress returns Tuesday to a crowded agenda of unfinished business overshadowed by the urgent need for President Obama and lawmakers to avert the economic double hit of tax increases and automatic spending cuts. One week after the elections - and seven weeks after they last gathered in Washington, Republicans and Democrats face a daunting task in a lame-duck session that Capitol Hill fears could last until the final hours of Dec. 31. But even before serious budget negotiations can begin, lawmakers will tackle leftover legislation on trade with Russia, military budgets and aiding farmers still reeling from the summer's drought.
SPORTS
September 3, 2009 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jerome Hayes could have said goodbye to Penn State football, and no one could blame him if he had. Two grueling rehabilitations over the last two years from torn anterior cruciate knee ligaments, first in his right knee, then his left, would have been enough for anyone to say, "Thanks. It's been fun. " But Hayes did not want the last memory of his college career to be writhing in pain and uncertainty as he was carried off the lush green grass of Beaver Stadium in the second game of the 2008 season.
NEWS
August 16, 1987 | By Bud Newman, United Press International
With Congress into its monthlong summer recess, lawmakers in each house can look back on some major legislative accomplishments. But they can also look ahead to a ton of unfinished business when they return Sept. 9. The number of major bills that cleared both houses - and in some cases a veto from President Reagan - to find their way into the law books since the 100th Congress convened in January is small. Final action on most major legislative goals set by congressional leaders will have to wait until fall.
NEWS
January 25, 2007 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ronald Santiago had planned to fly to Puerto Rico with his parents earlier this month to buy a vacation house. The trip was canceled after Santiago, a 35-year-old father of three from Northeast Philadelphia, was beaten to death Dec. 8 inside a Kensington house he was rehabbing. His father, Carmelo Santiago, 62, now plans to leave - not for a vacation, but for good. "Pretty soon this going to look like a ghost town," he said outside the house at F and Clearfield Streets that his son was fixing for resale.
SPORTS
September 6, 2012 | By Chris Melchiorre, For The Inquirer
In four years as freshman field hockey coach at Bishop Eustace, Danielle Senior came to understand one of the first signs of a truly special player, and Alex Pecora fit the bill. "They stole her from me," Senior said jokingly. "She went straight to varsity. " Senior was more of an observer of Pecora over the last three seasons, watching the star goalie's development, encouraging her whenever she could. Now in her first year as the team's varsity coach, Senior is witness to what she said was a noticeable spike in Pecora's development.
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NEWS
October 20, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Staff Writer
Can women have it all? Yes, but only if we stop answering that very old and tired question in the same way, says Anne-Marie Slaughter, author of Unfinished Business: Women Men Work Family (Random House). If Slaughter's name stirs a memory, perhaps it's because she also wrote a famous 2012 essay in the Atlantic, "Why Women Still Can't Have It All," a fierce, fed-up talker about how tough it remains for women with children to advance in their careers. Not that having children had stopped Slaughter from speeding ahead on her own. Three years ago, she was director of policy planning in the State Department when she resigned to resume her posts as a law professor, author and dean at Princeton University, where she had taken leave.
NEWS
October 19, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
BACK IN 2012, Anne-Marie Slaughter wrote a piece in the Atlantic called "Why Women Still Can't Have It All. " It was a fierce, fed-up essay about how tough it remains for women with kids to advance in their careers, 50 years after feminism was born. The essay went viral and Slaughter has broadened it into a new book, Unfinished Business: Women Men Work Family , which she'll discuss at the National Constitution Center on Monday evening. I'll be interviewing her there, so I've been thinking a lot about work-life balance, an issue that has consumed me since I became a parent 19 years ago. I remember racing around the kitchen one morning, congested with a cold, my baby fussing on my shoulder, stuffing bottles into a bag, racing to the sitter's and then speeding into work, only to find I was wearing two different shoes.
NEWS
March 29, 2015 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brendon Little and his Conestoga baseball teammates have unfinished business after advancing to the PIAA Class AAAA state final last season and losing to La Salle in eight innings. "We lost quite a few seniors, but we expect to have another successful year," Little said. "The new guys are coming along nicely. " The return of Little, a hard-throwing lefthander and North Carolina recruit, goes a long way toward the team's primary goal of claiming a Central League title. He delivers a fastball that tops out at 94 m.p.h.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
MOVIEGOERS and celebrity wrongdoers seemed to take the weekend off. Misdeeds were even more nonexistent than the box office. Neill Blomkamp 's R-rated "Chappie" might have taken the No. 1 spot in its 3,201-theater debut, but its modest $13.3 million gross was a career low for Blomkamp, whose previous films, "Elysium" and "District 9," debuted at $29.8 million and $37.4 million, respectively. The R-rated Vince Vaughn comedy "Unfinished Business" fared even worse, opening at No. 10 to a dismal $4.8 million.
NEWS
October 23, 2013
Pedro Ramos' second tour as the city's top education policymaker was shorter than it seemed. In just two years, Ramos presided over dramatic reductions in the School District's spending, operations, and facilities, enduring uproar from parents, employees, and the public as the price of demonstrating the schools' commitment to reform. Unfortunately, he is leaving a district that still has very little to show for the painful retrenchment of his tenure. Ramos resigned as chairman of the School Reform Commission on Monday, citing urgent family concerns, which means the governor, who has the power to appoint three of the SRC's five members, will have to find a replacement - preferably one with some of Ramos' education experience and willingness to depart from past district practice.
NEWS
March 1, 2013
*  RED WIDOW. 9 p.m. Sunday, 6 ABC. Moves to 10 p.m. Sundays on March 10. IF THIS COUNTRY ever legalizes drugs, TV writers will be among the first to take a hit. (No, not that kind.) When the American dream goes south for their middle-class characters, drug-dealing is less likely to be the fix of choice, since taxed and licensed transactions just don't pack the dramatic punch required by shows such as "Breaking Bad," or even "Weeds. " Maybe we'll see more bank robberies?
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Kathleen Tinney, Inquirer Staff Writer
She had him at do-si-do. The end of World War II set off a square-dancing craze, and Elizabeth Moses, an occupational therapy student of Quaker stock, kicked up her heels, twirled her pettiskirts, and joined in. At a hoedown in Philadelphia, she circled left and circled right into the path of her future husband. She and lawyer Charles Thomas later settled on a 13-acre Deptford farm and turned it into a square-dance Xanadu. Hoedown Hall opened in the early 1950s, first in the Thomases' barn and then in an outbuilding with a floor reinforced to take a pounding from 150 or more feet on Saturday nights.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2013 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: For the last two years, I have been seeing a man I care about very much. We've had a tumultuous, on/off relationship due to some mistakes I made early on that he couldn't or wouldn't forgive. Now he says he is ready to give the relationship another shot, with this caveat: I cannot ever spend time with my best friend. He has met her only once, but never liked her due to a bad first impression and because I told him she participated in some illegal activities. While I don't agree with some of her choices, she has been a wonderful friend for my entire life and has cleaned up her act for the most part.
BUSINESS
November 27, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
The report was called "Taking Care of Business: Improving Philadelphia's Small Business Climate. " Released last November by the Sustainable Business Network of Greater Philadelphia (SBN) and funded with a $75,000 grant from the William Penn Foundation, it went on for 41 pages, detailing the many ways the city drives small businesses crazy, and what should be done to change that. One year later, a report is slated for release Monday outlining progress made in addressing SBN's concerns.
NEWS
November 14, 2012 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Congress returns Tuesday to a crowded agenda of unfinished business overshadowed by the urgent need for President Obama and lawmakers to avert the economic double hit of tax increases and automatic spending cuts. One week after the elections - and seven weeks after they last gathered in Washington, Republicans and Democrats face a daunting task in a lame-duck session that Capitol Hill fears could last until the final hours of Dec. 31. But even before serious budget negotiations can begin, lawmakers will tackle leftover legislation on trade with Russia, military budgets and aiding farmers still reeling from the summer's drought.
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