CollectionsUnicef
IN THE NEWS

Unicef

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 14, 2000 | By Michelle Malkin
Breast is best. " No, it's not the new slogan for Hooters. It's the mantra of breast-feeding advocates who promote their cause with a cultlike fervor around the world. Their extremism must be condemned. I have nothing against breast-feeding. After weighing the pros and cons, I've been nursing my 51/2-month-old daughter since birth. Mother's milk offers my baby health benefits that man-made substitutes can't match. But in the hands of the United Nations Children's Fund, the breast-feeding crusade is killing the children it's supposed to protect.
NEWS
March 20, 1990 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Diary of Anne Frank has become this century's primer in the illumination of the human spirit. The pages written from her hiding place in Holland have made the young - and doomed - girl the symbol of hope, love and affirmation amid devastation. Her diary, published after she disappeared in the death camps late in World War II, has been a book and the basis of films, plays and meditations. In its latest transformation, it is the basis of a series of concerts around the country to raise money for UNICEF, the United Nations relief agency for children.
NEWS
December 20, 2000 | by Charles J. Lyons
Michelle Malkin's column (Dec. 14) presents an agonizingly complex situation in a dangerously simplistic manner and is appalling in its omission of fact. Incredibly, she charges that UNICEF is doing little to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Africa, instead spending most of its time holding a grudge against the infant formula industry, conducting a "homicidal mission" and advancing a breast-feeding "crusade. " Malkin based her column on an incomplete set of facts in the Wall Street Journal and did not bother to contact UNICEF for a response.
NEWS
March 4, 1987 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Datta Roy, a UNICEF field-worker visiting from Nepal, was on the airport bus yesterday morning, crawling through the rush-hour Queens traffic, when "this little old lady" leaned over and told him about Danny Kaye. "I had this folder on my lap with UNICEF stamped across it," Roy said. "So she touched my arm and looked at me very sadly and told me about his death. I thought, here I am, after traveling thousands of miles from a remote corner of the world, and I hear from this old woman that our chief good-will ambassador has died.
NEWS
January 17, 1996 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Gretchen Lee Goodale, 47, senior program coordinator for UNICEF in Bangladesh and a former resident of Westtown, drowned Jan. 5 on the island of Maui in Hawaii. Ms. Goodale, who was born in Cleveland, graduated from the Tower Hill School in Wilmington and from Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, Mass. She lived in Westtown from 1961 to 1966. "She always considered this her home and came back whenever she could," said her sister, Lisa Goodale Brinton of Cochranville.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
She keeps seeing the haunted faces of hungry children, and one of those faces is her own. So Audrey Hepburn, once the glamorous gamine of the silver screen, now 60 years old, labors long for UNICEF as its goodwill ambassador. She is uncomfortable about being praised for this. She does it, she says, because she must. She will be appearing here March 19 in a UNICEF benefit at the Academy of Music. It is the first of three benefit concerts in America showcasing a new musical work based on The Diary of Anne Frank.
NEWS
August 15, 2004 | Carolyn Davis
is a member of The Inquirer Editorial Board My "All Join Hands" columns have taken two tracks. One is to improve the protection of children in Philadelphia and the surrounding counties from violence, be it from a finger on a trigger or the hand of an adult. The second runs through the African nation of Uganda. Thousands of children in the north there have been abducted and forced into being soldiers or slaves in a civil war. You've heard of UNICEF, the United Nations' agency for children.
NEWS
January 26, 2001 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
C. Lloyd Bailey, 82, a Quaker peace activist who served for 23 years as the chief American fund-raiser for UNICEF, died Tuesday of pneumonia at his home at Foulkeways, a retirement community in Gwynedd, Montgomery County. As president of the United States Committee for UNICEF starting in 1959, Mr. Bailey transformed a modest, independent fund-raising operation into a national cause. He got thousands of youngsters to join the group's "Trick Or Treat For UNICEF" campaign and emphasized the use of big-name celebrities, including Muhammad Ali and Danny Kaye, to solicit millions of dollars in aid for poor and sick children in 160 countries.
NEWS
October 30, 2000 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Clyde Allison and his wife, Mary Emma, were taken aback by the piles of goodies their children brought back to their Hatboro home one Halloween in the late 1940s. "It's too bad we can't turn this into something good, " Mary Emma told her husband. "We can," he replied. Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF was born. After the conversation, Mr. Allison went to his office in Center City, sat down at his typewriter, and wrote an article for the Junior High Kit, a Presbyterian youth magazine he edited from the church's national education headquarters in Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 2, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1950, the Rev. Clyde Allison sat down at his Center City desk and wrote an article for Junior High Kit, a Presbyterian youth publication that he edited. It proposed that for Halloween, children dress up not as ghosts or goblins, but as folks from other countries, and trick-or-treat for contributions to UNICEF, the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund. On Oct. 31, 1950, the first effort took place in Philadelphia and a few other cities. In newspaper reports marking the national event's 25th and 50th anniversaries, Mr. Allison credited his wife for sparking the article.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Help Philippine relief efforts More celebs stepped up this week to help relief efforts in storm-ravaged Philippines, with Rihanna donating $100,000 to the U.S. Fund for UNICEF. The singer, WNBA's Skylar Diggins , MLB star Robinson CanĂ³ , and actor Vanessa Hudgens this week helped launch the new UNICEF initiative, There for the Philippines, which provides immediate and long-term help for children affected by Typhoon Haiyan. Don't diss Scarlett Johansson The mysterious org behind the Golden Globes has ruled that Scarlett Johansson is ineligible for a best actress award for her part as the voice of a computer named Samantha in Spike Jonze 's futuristic romance Her , because she's never on-screen in the flesh.
NEWS
September 23, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
How do you get from Philadelphia to Myanmar? It's easy, Jim Connor says: Turn left at Thailand. The hard part comes once you're there, trying to work with and around a slowly, slowly opening government that's not used to outsiders and is particularly suspicious of social workers. Connor, 40, spent the last decade on the contentious Thailand-Myanmar border, his Whispering Seed project providing housing, education, and job skills to orphans and to children from displaced families.
NEWS
March 31, 2012 | By Angus Shaw, Associated Press
HARARE, Zimbabwe - Zimbabwe's education ministry said Friday it was investigating how school textbooks donated by the United Nations children's agency have been winding up in the hands of bookstores and street vendors. The United Nations Children's Fund has supplied 22 million books since late 2010 after a decade of economic meltdown that left many schools without teaching materials. In some schools, scores of pupils had shared a single book. Education Minister David Coltart said Friday that culprits behind the theft and sale of books - officially the property of government schools - would be prosecuted.
NEWS
January 28, 2012 | By Bassem Mroue and Zeina Karam, ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT - Two days of bloody turmoil in Syria killed at least 74 people, including small children, as forces loyal to President Bashar Assad shelled residential buildings and fired on crowds in a dramatic escalation of violence, activists said Friday. Video posted online showed the bodies of five small children, five women and a man, all bloodied and piled on beds in what appeared to be an apartment after a building was hit in the city of Homs. A narrator said an entire family had been "slaughtered.
NEWS
January 25, 2012
Northern lights stun stargazers STOCKHOLM - A storm from the broiling sun turned the chilly northernmost skies of Earth into an ever-changing and awe-provoking art show of northern lights on Tuesday. Even experienced stargazers were stunned by the intensity of the aurora borealis that swept across the night sky in northern Scandinavia after the biggest solar flare in six years. "It has been absolutely incredible," British astronomer John Mason cried from the deck of the MS Midnatsol, a cruise ship plying the fjord-fringed coast of northern Norway.
FOOD
October 27, 2011
UNICEF, the United Nations Children's Fund, gets less attention these days for its Halloween coin collection. The project started in Philadelphia in 1948, when the Rev. Clyde Allison and his wife, Mary Emma, wanted to "turn trick-or-treat into something good. " More than $164 million later, UNICEF still aims to improve the lives of children worldwide (youth.unicefusa.org). Back then, one cent bought 20 glasses of milk, UNICEF organizers said. Now Philabundance, the region's largest hunger relief organization, is launching a local Halloween coin campaign, and it needs 50 cents to provide one meal to one of the region's 900,000 food-insecure individuals.
NEWS
March 11, 2011
Frederick Daniel Hatfield Jr., 87, of West Deptford, a retired business owner, died Wednesday, March 9, of complications from surgery at Underwood-Memorial Hospital in Woodbury. For 30 years, until retiring in 1995, Mr. Hatfield operated Jersey Maid Foods in Cherry Hill. The firm distributed bulk candy to grocery stores. Previously he was a salesman for Brach's candy in New Jersey and for Necco candy in Massachusetts. Mr. Hatfield grew up in Belmont, Mass., near Boston. Though he lived most of his life in New Jersey, he never lost his New England traits, including his Boston accent and his love of fresh seafood, his daughter Janice said.
NEWS
November 2, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1950, the Rev. Clyde Allison sat down at his Center City desk and wrote an article for Junior High Kit, a Presbyterian youth publication that he edited. It proposed that for Halloween, children dress up not as ghosts or goblins, but as folks from other countries, and trick-or-treat for contributions to UNICEF, the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund. On Oct. 31, 1950, the first effort took place in Philadelphia and a few other cities. In newspaper reports marking the national event's 25th and 50th anniversaries, Mr. Allison credited his wife for sparking the article.
SPORTS
April 20, 2010 | By Kate Fagan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Professional Basketball Writers Association on Monday named 76ers center Samuel Dalembert as the recipient of the J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award for 2009-10. The award, named for the NBA's second commissioner, honors an NBA player or coach for "outstanding service and dedication to the community. " Dalembert was honored for his efforts after a devastating earthquake hit his native country, Haiti, on Jan. 12. Dalembert twice visited Haiti, raised awareness for relief, and donated $100,000 to UNICEF.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|