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NEWS
March 27, 1995 | BY CAL THOMAS
The diversity game - whose chief rule seems to be that your gender or race is more important than your brain - could have serious consequences for many of the world's poor children, who have come to rely on the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) as their front-line protection against starvation and disease. The Clinton administration has played the diversity game since the 1992 election, in many cases elevating unqualified people to top positions for reasons that have nothing to do with their experience or ability, but everything to do with their race and gender.
NEWS
October 20, 2001 | By Sumana Chatterjee INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In the week since President Bush asked children to earn a dollar to donate to the American Fund for Afghan Children, more than 181,000 envelopes have arrived in a special White House postal box. The money will go to the American Red Cross to spend on medicine, clothes, food and shelter for Afghan children coping with war and a harsh winter. Although the money has yet to be counted, the Red Cross plans to spend $800,000 on medicine, winter clothes, water tanks and tents. The fund will add to the $320 million in new government aid to Afghans since the American bombing on the Taliban regime's forces began Oct. 7. The United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
NEWS
October 23, 2001
FOR 51 YEARS, beginning here in Philadelphia, Trick-or-Treating for the United Nations' Children's Fund has reminded children that they are not alone in the world - and that they are not helpless. This year, that message is even more important. Following President Bush's appeal to American children to send money to help children in Afghanistan, the U.S. Fund for UNICEF announced it will apply all the proceeds of this year's Halloween campaign to the critical needs of Afghan children.
NEWS
March 31, 2012 | By Angus Shaw, Associated Press
HARARE, Zimbabwe - Zimbabwe's education ministry said Friday it was investigating how school textbooks donated by the United Nations children's agency have been winding up in the hands of bookstores and street vendors. The United Nations Children's Fund has supplied 22 million books since late 2010 after a decade of economic meltdown that left many schools without teaching materials. In some schools, scores of pupils had shared a single book. Education Minister David Coltart said Friday that culprits behind the theft and sale of books - officially the property of government schools - would be prosecuted.
NEWS
December 11, 1995
Because of advances in weapons technology, and because most conflicts are within countries rather than between them, children have suffered horribly in the last decade: 2 million children killed. 4 million to 5 million disabled. 12 million left homeless. 1 million orphaned or separated from their parents. 10 million with psychological trauma. Those horrors are among the sobering reports in "State of the World's Children" for 1996 from the United Nations Children Fund (UNICEF)
NEWS
December 22, 1993
Who doesn't rejoice, especially at Christmastime, that the Cold War - and the spectre of nuclear annihilation - has ended? Who doesn't rejoice that the Good Guys won - and without incinerating anything? Hold the ho-ho-ho's, please. We did not survive the Cold War intact. In fact, that idea is "the first and most dangerous placebo of the new age," says the United Nation's Children's Fund (UNICEF). As UNICEF's annual report on the state of the world's children observes, the Cold War was more destructive than any other war in human history.
NEWS
November 6, 2001 | INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The ruling Taliban hopes to vaccinate 5.7 million Afghans against polio today, despite the U.S.-led bombing campaign, the health minister said. Afghanistan is one of a few countries where polio persists. Thirty-six cases have been reported this year. An annual vaccination program introduced in 1997 with foreign assistance has been successful, the World Health Organization said. Foreign aid workers have left Afghanistan - most pulled out by their organizations by mid-September, the remainder ordered out by the Taliban - so vaccinations supplied by the WHO and UNICEF will be given largely by local volunteers.
NEWS
November 3, 2001
From the mouths of kids: A thoughtful and sensitive reader wrote a letter to the editor this week suggesting a way America could get around this anthrax mail problem. Mike LaRosa is just 11, but despite his young age - or perhaps because of it - he proposed a remedy that is impressively straightforward. Send more postcards, Mike said. The young man was talking about Christmas cards, and his special concern is postal workers and their potential exposure to spores lurking within sealed envelopes.
SPORTS
January 16, 2010 | By Kate Fagan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Very soon, 76ers center Samuel Dalembert will return to Haiti, his native country recently devastated by an earthquake. Dalembert intended to charter a plane after last night's home game against the Sacramento Kings, but he must wait for border clearance. "I think it will be postponed until the following week," Dalembert said before the game. "Most likely, I'm going to go over there and distribute some stuff, pick up my brother and sister, and come back. " Dalembert, 28, pledged $100,000 of his own money to UNICEF, which aids relief efforts in Haiti.
NEWS
November 16, 2011
Child deaths rise in Somalia attacks NAIROBI, Kenya - An increasing number of children are being caught in attacks and crossfire across south and central Somalia, the U.N.'s children agency said Tuesday, as a land mine targeting police exploded at the world's largest refugee camp in neighboring Kenya, wounding two people. UNICEF said that 24 children were killed in conflict in Somalia in October, nearly double the confirmed child killings of every other month this year. UNICEF said 58 children also were confirmed to have been injured in October, the highest number this year.
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