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NEWS
December 16, 2001 | By Donald D. Groff FOR THE INQUIRER
With the euro about to take over as the coin of the realm for a dozen Western European countries, many travelers have a golden opportunity to perform a charitable act. The people in question are those who have French francs, German marks or other Western European money tucked, almost forgotten, into the back of dresser drawers, and who do not plan to use it or keep it as a souvenir. The charitable act is to dig out that cash and donate it to Change for Good, a program through which unused foreign currency is redeemed and used to provide lifesaving supplies and services for needy children through UNICEF, the United Nations Children's Fund.
NEWS
December 30, 1989 | By JOANNE JACOBS
Christmas Day, as American children struggled to keep Super Mario Brothers from video doom, 40,000 children died. Another 40,000 the next day; 40,000 more die today. By New Year's Eve, the death toll for children in 1989 will reach 14 million. If things continue on their present course, UNICEF predicts that more than 100 million children will die from illness and malnutrition in the 1990s. Most die of illnesses that can be prevented by a $1.50 vaccine or treated with 10 cents' worth of oral rehydration salts or $1 in antibiotics.
NEWS
December 25, 1988 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
Otto Gardner's oil pastel Toilette was drawing a crowd of curious onlookers, many of whom had to laugh when they looked at the painting. "Look at that," one woman said, pointing. What she was pointing at wasn't the painting of a man's face, but the toilet seat frame surrounding it. Two pennies were glued to the seat to "cover up holes," Gardner said. Toilette was one of 10 works Gardner displayed last week at the Abington Art Center. He's always painted, but this was the first time his work had been shown in public.
NEWS
September 23, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
How do you get from Philadelphia to Myanmar? It's easy, Jim Connor says: Turn left at Thailand. The hard part comes once you're there, trying to work with and around a slowly, slowly opening government that's not used to outsiders and is particularly suspicious of social workers. Connor, 40, spent the last decade on the contentious Thailand-Myanmar border, his Whispering Seed project providing housing, education, and job skills to orphans and to children from displaced families.
NEWS
December 24, 1992
"Eat everything on your plate," Mother would demand, as you diddled with the peas or sculpted mountains out of mashed potatoes. "Don't waste food, children are starving in Africa!" From the Sudan to Ethiopia, from Bosnia to Somalia, the threat of famine has always seemed global and inevitable - and the most vulnerable victims are the children. Depressing stuff. But on this Christmas Eve there is good news: It doesn't have to be that way. In its 1993 State of the World's Children Report, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
SPORTS
January 5, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
The Rockets' Tracy McGrady, the Lakers' Kobe Bryant, the Pacers' Jermaine O'Neal and four other NBA players have promised to donate $1,000 for every point they score in a game later this week to help victims of the Indian Ocean tsunami. The Rockets' Bob Sura, the Raptors' Jalen Rose and the Grizzlies' Pau Gasol and Mike Miller also are taking part in the $1,000-per-point donations, which will be made to UNICEF. "I first talked about it with Jermaine and Tracy right before New Year's.
NEWS
January 25, 2012
Northern lights stun stargazers STOCKHOLM - A storm from the broiling sun turned the chilly northernmost skies of Earth into an ever-changing and awe-provoking art show of northern lights on Tuesday. Even experienced stargazers were stunned by the intensity of the aurora borealis that swept across the night sky in northern Scandinavia after the biggest solar flare in six years. "It has been absolutely incredible," British astronomer John Mason cried from the deck of the MS Midnatsol, a cruise ship plying the fjord-fringed coast of northern Norway.
NEWS
October 22, 2006 | By Gene D'Alessandro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George Michael came not to bury marijuana but to praise it. The perpetually troubled pop star highlighted a taping session for a TV interview by smoking a joint, the British television network ITV reported. Antidrug campaigners were not amused. "Stupid and naive" was the way one of them characterized Michael's toke break. The tabloid-trotting singer lit up while being interviewed for The South Bank Show, a program dedicated to the arts, ITV said. The interview is scheduled for an Oct. 31 broadcast in the U.K. "This stuff keeps me sane and happy," Michael, 43, said in the interview.
NEWS
July 4, 1996 | By Wendy Greenberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When media teacher John Serpentelli told his summer school students they would be making an animated film, they were dubious. When he told the youngsters, ages 8 to 12, that the film was destined for Sesame Street, they were sure he was out of his mind. But just two weeks into the six-week-long class at Cedarbrook Middle School, the students are indeed amateur animators. And their confidence is bolstered knowing that, yes, the producers of the popular children's show really do plan to air their short feature in the fall.
NEWS
April 10, 1994 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So did Zlata actually write her diary? Was it massaged by translators, editors, avid publicists? How to account for differences noted by one critic between the version of the diary first published by UNICEF and the version recently published by Viking? Questions about Zlata's Diary: A Child's Life in Sarajevo surfaced almost as soon as the book was out. Viking has said that the UNICEF edition was abridged and did not contain all of Zlata's text. In her diary, young Zlata Filipovic describes the end of summer, the beginning of fifth grade . . . and, then, the beginning of war. On Sept.
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