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NEWS
December 14, 2000 | By Michelle Malkin
Breast is best. " No, it's not the new slogan for Hooters. It's the mantra of breast-feeding advocates who promote their cause with a cultlike fervor around the world. Their extremism must be condemned. I have nothing against breast-feeding. After weighing the pros and cons, I've been nursing my 51/2-month-old daughter since birth. Mother's milk offers my baby health benefits that man-made substitutes can't match. But in the hands of the United Nations Children's Fund, the breast-feeding crusade is killing the children it's supposed to protect.
NEWS
October 30, 2000 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Clyde Allison and his wife, Mary Emma, were taken aback by the piles of goodies their children brought back to their Hatboro home one Halloween in the late 1940s. "It's too bad we can't turn this into something good, " Mary Emma told her husband. "We can," he replied. Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF was born. After the conversation, Mr. Allison went to his office in Center City, sat down at his typewriter, and wrote an article for the Junior High Kit, a Presbyterian youth magazine he edited from the church's national education headquarters in Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2000 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Halloween we celebrate today is nothing like the original Halloween. It wasn't called Halloween then, either. It was started about 2,000 years ago, or so people believe, by the Celts, who lived in what is now Britain, Scotland, Ireland and northern France (and whose descendants play basketball in Boston). They called it Samhain (summer's end) and celebrated it on the eve of the new year, which began the first of November. The Celts thought the souls of the dead returned for the evening.
NEWS
October 20, 1999 | TOM GRALISH / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Magician Harley Newman began to right himself after removing a straitjacket while dangling above City Hall in Philadelphia yesterday. Several magicians are attempting such feats in U.S. cities this week. Their efforts will be part of "World Magic Awards" on the Fox Family Channel at 8 p.m. Friday. Part of the proceeds from the show will be donated to UNICEF.
NEWS
February 28, 1999 | By Sonia Krishnan, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Kent Rogers remembers, with a tug on his heart, the swarms of hungry children he saw on the streets of Nepal. Many were bone-thin from severe malnutrition. Some stuck out their tiny hands to beg for money, food - anything. One little girl followed him home for a mile, hoping he would feed her, Rogers said. A three-month visit in 1997 was the turning point for Rogers and his philanthropic group, the Loving Arms Mission. It sealed the group's decision to set up an orphanage in Nepal, even if it could help only a handful of children at a time.
SPORTS
December 12, 1998 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Tickets are on sale for the NBA players exhibition game Dec. 19 in Atlantic City. Finally. And talks between the league's owners and the locked-out players might just continue today or tomorrow. Thankfully. Commissioner David Stern and National Basketball Players Association executive director Billy Hunter were among the principals at a secret five-hour meeting Thursday in New York. "We agreed not to discuss any of the details, and I don't want to break that pledge," deputy commissioner Russ Granik said.
SPORTS
December 11, 1998 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
While agents David Falk and Arn Tellem worked on a Dec. 19 charity exhibition game in Atlantic City, representatives of the NBA and the locked-out players were meeting secretly in New York. Although league officials declined to comment, sources confirmed that commissioner David Stern and National Basketball Players Association executive director Billy Hunter attended the meeting and that it appeared some progress had been made. One source indicated additional discussions could be held during the weekend.
NEWS
December 27, 1997
Is surplus for real, and what is to be done with it? The editorial "The budget surprise" cautions against too much euphoria over a possible budget surplus (Inquirer, Dec. 23). It correctly points out, that except for the Federal Reserve and a robust private sector (lead by high-tech gains), we could easily face a deficit. Current economic problems abroad could contribute to a downturn. Absent from your comments (and from public discourse) is the ever-present national debt with its numbing interest burden.
LIVING
September 3, 1997 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This article contains information from the Associated Press, the New York Daily News, the New York Post and Reuters
All you need is love, and, if you're Yoko Ono, a reason for revenge. The romance of John Lennon and Ono may finally come to the big screen, years after Columbia Pictures first approached Lennon's widow about making a film based on her version of their relationship from their first meeting all the way up to his murder in December 1980. Beatles fans, however, are gasping a collective "Oh no!" at the prospect of Yoko, 64, using the proposed $65 million movie to settle old scores with critics who say that she was behind the band's break-up.
LIVING
December 15, 1996 | By Steven Rea, Carrie Rickey and Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITICS
The holidays and Hollywood go hand in hand - not just at the multiplexes, where the studios have unleashed a dizzying array of late-year releases, but in the bookstores, where star biographies and coffee-table books on all-things-movies abound. Read on. THE ART OF THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME By Stephen Rebello Huperion. $50 The coins may be pouring into the Disney coffers from that holiday hot spot 101 Dalmatians, but the kudos for the year certainly go to The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
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