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Union Carbide

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BUSINESS
September 22, 1989 | By Steve Thomma, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The use of chlorofluorocarbons, which are blamed for thinning Earth's protective ozone layer, could be cut by as much as 10 percent worldwide with the use of a new chemical process for manufacturing the soft foam used in sofas and mattresses, its developer said yesterday. Officials of Union Carbide Corp. said consumers would continue to pay the same for furniture and other goods made with the foam because it would cost no more than foam produced with chlorofluorocarbons, which are often called CFCs.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1990 | By Marian Uhlman and Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Staff Writers
Union Carbide Corp. said yesterday that it would build its first plastics- recycling plant in Piscataway, N.J., thereby joining a growing number of U.S. firms trying to give plastics a second life. Union Carbide touts its plant, expected to open early next year, as the first commercial U.S. operation that will recycle plastics used both for milk containers and for trash bags. "This is trash to you; it's raw material to us," said Gordon D. Mounts, Union Carbide polyolefins division vice president, gesturing to a pile of trash bags, oil jugs and soda bottles.
NEWS
December 16, 1998 | By Scott Fallon, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After months of negotiating with the Union Carbide Corp., a local advocacy group will be able to have its own toxicologist participate in the testing of a chemical many here believe may be responsible for a rash of childhood cancer cases. The group's toxicologist will not meet with Union Carbide directly but only with scientists from the federal and state agencies that are developing the latest tests to determine if styrene-acrylonitrile trimer is a carcinogen. The agencies, led by the federal Environmental Protection Agency, will then meet privately with officials from Union Carbide, which is funding the tests on its own waste by-product.
NEWS
February 13, 1994 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rustic common sense and a fatalism many centuries old persuaded Vir Singh to stay in his shack that awful night, rather than flee. "If we are destined to live, we shall live; if we are destined to die, we shall die," he told his wife, Razia, and their four children. "Besides, where do we run? The danger of the gas is everywhere. " Singh made his family lie down on the ground of their hut. He threw a tattered mattress over them. And there, huddled together in their sweat and fear, surrounded by cries of confusion and panic, the family prayed.
NEWS
April 18, 1986
The April 4 editorial "Busting a chemical scofflaw" aroused my indignation. I am responding as a private reader rather than a representative of Union Carbide, though I have been employed by the company for two decades. The thrust of the editorial implies that Union Carbide is both irresponsible and indifferent toward the well-being of employees and surrounding communities. Inflammatory remarks about dispatching "human canaries" to sniff deadly gasses, routine cover-ups, defective safety equipment and company "readiness to forget about safety" make Union Carbide management and employees look like suicidal maniacs.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1990 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Federal Trade Commission yesterday said it would seek a federal court order rescinding Arco Chemical Co.'s $220 million acquisition of two chemical lines from Union Carbide Corp. The FTC said the deal, if allowed to go forward, could "substantially reduce competition" in the manufacture and sale of two chemical products widely used in personal-care goods, furniture and other items. It is unclear what such an action would mean for Arco, a Newtown Square company 83 percent of which is owned by Atlantic Richfield Co. In announcing the acquisition in September, Arco said it would pay $220 million for the two Union Carbide lines before the deal was consummated and assume all risk from obtaining government approval of the purchase.
NEWS
February 26, 1987 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The judge hearing the $3 billion Bhopal damage suit against the Union Carbide Corp. was transferred last week, reportedly after it came to light that a claim in his name was pending against the company. The judge, G.S. Patel of Madhya Pradesh District Court, had been presiding over the case for about four months in Bhopal, where more than 2,340 people died in 1984 in the world's worst industrial accident. The case was taken over Tuesday by M.W. Deo, the fourth judge assigned to the case since it entered the Indian court system in September.
NEWS
March 23, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Union Carbide Corp. has reached a tentative settlement with attorneys representing victims of the chemical leak at its Bhopal, India, plant that killed more than 2,000 people and injured at least 200,000, a company spokesman said last night. The spokesman, Kurt Mazurosky, would not comment on the amount of the tentative settlement. He said the settlement was subject to final negotiations and required the approval of U.S. District Judge John Keenan in New York. He said Union Carbide would not give final approval to the settlement unless it was final and there would be no further claims.
NEWS
November 3, 1998 | By Scott Fallon and Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Many people here thought there might be a connection: Union Carbide had dumped 5,000 drums of chemical waste near the town's drinking-water supply 30 years ago, and now health officials have found that some childhood cancer rates in Toms River are two to four times the national average. So it made perfect sense to test a Union Carbide waste by-product found in the water supply to determine whether the substance is carcinogenic. What doesn't make sense to many people is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's choice of who should manage the studies: Union Carbide.
NEWS
October 5, 1986 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
It has been years since organic chemicals, arsenic, sulfates, oils and greases were dumped on the grounds of a Paulsboro bottling company, but the underground water contamination caused by that dumping is still being cleaned up. Neither the state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), the bottling company nor its parent concern knows exactly when the problem was created at Paulsboro Packaging, which manufactures bottles and fills them with automotive products produced elsewhere.
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NEWS
June 27, 2010
Madhusree Mukerjee is the author of the forthcoming "Churchill's Secret War: The British Empire and the Ravaging of India During World War II" Even as President Obama is insisting that BP pay for all the damage caused by its oil spill, his administration is leaning on the Indian government to render its citizens unable to claim damages from U.S. power-plant suppliers in the event of a nuclear accident. Before U.S. companies enter India's burgeoning nuclear-power market, the U.S. government is pushing for legislation limiting their liability.
NEWS
May 17, 2010
I ALWAYS KNEW there are some words you don't use in polite company. A few years ago I learned there is one word you can't use even in impolite company. The word starts with a C, it's slang for a word that starts with a V, and it's the most loathsome way you can refer to one part of a woman's anatomy. It's in the news - or the courts, anyway - because the C-word was used against a female lawyer. By a male lawyer. On tape. And rather than apologize for it, he stands by it. I've gotta talk to this dude.
NEWS
April 10, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charles B. Herman, 81, of Villanova, a chemical engineer who studied global warming, died Thursday, Feb. 25, of the blood disease myelodysplastic syndrome at Neighborhood Hospice in West Chester. From 1979 until retiring five years ago, Mr. Herman led Herman Energy Services, a consulting firm in Exton. He was an early advocate of energy conservation, said his daughter, Marcia. He began using compact fluorescent lightbulbs in his home years ago and always drove a fuel-efficient car, she added.
NEWS
February 1, 2007 | By Tom Infield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Roger Bacon, 80, a physicist who received a Franklin Institute science award in 2004, died of leukemia Saturday at his home in Oberlin, Ohio. Mr. Bacon, who held a doctorate from what is now Case Western Reserve University and spent most of his career at Union Carbide Co. in Cleveland, was given the institute's Benjamin Franklin Medal in Mechanical Engineering. The institute, at the time, said his research on graphite fibers had "transformed the field of material science and led to new ways of producing composite materials.
NEWS
December 2, 2004 | By Mike McPhate FOR THE INQUIRER
Like a phantom, the poison first came on a breeze. When Tank 610 blew at the Union Carbide pesticide plant Dec. 3, 1984, it unleashed a milky fog that would extinguish more than 15,000 lives in this ancient forested city. Two decades later, studies show a second poisonous onslaught brews underground. The warm rain of 20 monsoon seasons has washed an assortment of toxics left at the decaying Carbide factory into the groundwater of the same slums that bore the brunt of the gas leak, according to government and independent studies.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2001 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hercules Inc., a Wilmington specialty-chemical maker engaged in a proxy battle with its largest shareholder, said yesterday that former Union Carbide chairman William H. Joyce will become chief executive officer July 1. Joyce, 65, will succeed Thomas L. Gossage, who came out of retirement in October to serve temporarily as chief executive. Gossage had been chief executive of the company from 1991 to 1996. Hercules has been under pressure from Samuel J. Heyman to name a permanent chief executive.
NEWS
December 12, 1999 | By Juan C. Rodriguez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Maybe they skipped school too often, or were caught shoplifting. Still, their records have yet to be marred with serious juvenile offenses. These are the teens the Burlington County courts are trying to turn around with a one-on-one mentoring program scheduled to begin next month at Burlington City High School. Program organizers are seeking as many as 20 local professionals who can spend an hour a week with a young person who may be having a difficult time in school. "The problem is that juveniles are not receiving enough support," said Frank Carr, director of the county Court Resource Center, an administrative office of the Burlington County Superior Court.
NEWS
January 20, 1999 | By Scott Fallon, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The chemical that many here believe may be responsible for a rash of childhood cancer cases has a low potential to cause genetic defects or to be toxic to any specific body organ, preliminary toxicity tests on rats show. But scientists said yesterday that further testing needs to be done to determine whether styrene-acrylonitrile trimer, a byproduct of plastic manufacturing that has been found in trace amounts in local wells, is indeed a carcinogen. "It really doesn't tell us all that much," said John Gorin, manager for the federal Environmental Protection Agency's Reich Farm Superfund site in Toms River, where scientists believe the chemical originated.
NEWS
December 16, 1998 | By Scott Fallon, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After months of negotiating with the Union Carbide Corp., a local advocacy group will be able to have its own toxicologist participate in the testing of a chemical many here believe may be responsible for a rash of childhood cancer cases. The group's toxicologist will not meet with Union Carbide directly but only with scientists from the federal and state agencies that are developing the latest tests to determine if styrene-acrylonitrile trimer is a carcinogen. The agencies, led by the federal Environmental Protection Agency, will then meet privately with officials from Union Carbide, which is funding the tests on its own waste by-product.
NEWS
November 3, 1998 | By Scott Fallon and Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Many people here thought there might be a connection: Union Carbide had dumped 5,000 drums of chemical waste near the town's drinking-water supply 30 years ago, and now health officials have found that some childhood cancer rates in Toms River are two to four times the national average. So it made perfect sense to test a Union Carbide waste by-product found in the water supply to determine whether the substance is carcinogenic. What doesn't make sense to many people is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's choice of who should manage the studies: Union Carbide.
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