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NEWS
July 11, 1986 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Denouncing it as an attempt to strip workers of their "freedom of choice," Gov. Thornburgh vetoed a pro-labor bill yesterday that would have required public employees to pay union dues regardless of whether they were union members. Thornburgh's veto was expected. In his veto message, the governor said that the bill, called the "agency shop" measure, would have taken away an employee's right to support, or not to support, a union. "Indeed, the exercise of individual choice tends to act as an incentive for leadership to effectively represent membership since, under present law, a member can protest poor performance or policies of the union with which he or she disagrees by choosing to leave the union and stop paying dues," Thornburgh said.
NEWS
September 5, 1991 | by Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
A state hearing examiner has ruled that the city's blue-collar union must repay almost $600,000 in dues allegedly collected illegally from non-members. An attorney for District Council 33, American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, said she will appeal the ruling to the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board. Nan Lassen, the union's attorney, said DC33 has the right to collect dues from 2,000 non-members under provisions of the state Public Employee Relations Act. Under that act, unions with "union security" clauses in their collective bargaining agreements are allowed to require non-members to pay dues, Lassen said.
NEWS
June 4, 1987 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Supporters and opponents of controversial "agency-shop" measures before the General Assembly said yesterday that they would intensify their lobbying efforts after a week in which the bills got bogged down in both chambers. On Monday, the House tabled a bill affecting school employees after a provision was attached that would have slashed millions of dollars in state aid from Philadelphia schools. House Majority Leader James J. Manderino (D., Westmoreland) said he would not call up the bill for a vote until he was certain he had enough votes to kill the amendment.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2010 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The National Labor Relations Board in Philadelphia filed unfair-labor-practice charges this week against Aramark Corp., accusing the Philadelphia food-service company of withholding union dues and failing to bargain. A hearing is set for May 3 before a Philadelphia NLRB administrative law judge. More than 1,300 Aramark workers at the Convention Center, St. Joseph's University, the University of Pennsylvania's Steinberg Conference Center, the Wachovia Center, Citizens' Bank Park, and Lincoln Financial Field are affected.
NEWS
September 20, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
During most of her 25 years as a public schoolteacher, Jane Ladley did not have much use for the teachers' union, and now that she's retired, she's taking things one giant step further: She's suing it. On Thursday, the 61-year-old former Avon Grove district teacher and another teacher from Lancaster County filed a lawsuit against the state's largest teachers' union, the Pennsylvania State Education Association, over the handling of money they were...
NEWS
December 14, 2012
I DON'T BELONG to the American Bar Association because, years ago, the national umbrella group for my profession announced that it supported abortion rights. Not that anyone was really asking. Not that it was particularly relevant to the business of lawyering. Not that a statistical consensus had been reached as in, "Hi, my name is Trixie and I know I'm interrupting your dinner but, um, can I ask you a few questions about abortion?" The ABA simply came out and announced that it strongly supported Roe v. Wade . As soon as I found that out, I sent the money I would have paid in membership dues to several pro-life organizations.
NEWS
December 11, 1999 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Twenty-one nonunion Philadelphia prison workers yesterday sued the city, contending it is illegally deducting from their paychecks union dues that are being used by the union on political activities. The proposed class-action lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, is the second recent suit against the city by the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation Inc., of Springfield, Va., over the issue of involuntary payroll deduction of dues from nonunion workers.
NEWS
June 30, 2016
By Bill Pounds and Hugh Giordano In April, union-heavy West Virginia became the 26th right-to-work state in the country, leading some to wonder if Pennsylvania would soon follow. The Pennsylvania House of Representatives wasted no time introducing a package of six bills designed to make this thought a reality. Passing these bills would be a mistake for working people and business owners alike. At their most basic level, unions exist as a way to protect employees, considering that corporate interests begin with all the bargaining power.
NEWS
July 15, 1990 | By Lea Sitton, Inquirer Staff Writer
When it came time to pay the union dues, the boy would wend his way from his rowhouse on Montgomery Avenue in North Philadelphia to the Plasterer's Hall, just across Broad Street. It was more than 20 blocks to the Melon Street hall, and he was young, 8 or 9 years old, but the errand for his father was more than a chore. Edward F. Toohey was in training. Inside the hall, the son of Irish immigrants heard union talk, workingman talk, talk of politics. He was fascinated, and he worried that the plasterers would toss him out because they were strict about allowing in only those who belonged.
NEWS
December 27, 2012
By Matthew Rousu Now that Michigan has passed "right-to-work" legislation, such laws are in place in 24 states, allowing workers the right to choose not to pay dues to a union even if their company or organization has one. Pennsylvania should follow Michigan's lead. While I think the strongest argument for a right-to-work law has to do with freedom, let's focus on three substantial ways it would help Pennsylvania's economy. First, more money would stay in Pennsylvania. A portion of money currently spent on union dues goes out of state.
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NEWS
June 30, 2016
By Bill Pounds and Hugh Giordano In April, union-heavy West Virginia became the 26th right-to-work state in the country, leading some to wonder if Pennsylvania would soon follow. The Pennsylvania House of Representatives wasted no time introducing a package of six bills designed to make this thought a reality. Passing these bills would be a mistake for working people and business owners alike. At their most basic level, unions exist as a way to protect employees, considering that corporate interests begin with all the bargaining power.
NEWS
April 1, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Longtime labor leader Henry Nicholas breathed a sigh of relief Tuesday, when the U.S. Supreme Court deadlocked, thereby retaining public unions' abilities to collect mandatory fees in many states, including Pennsylvania and New Jersey. It was a sigh, but not a deep one. Waiting to exhale might be a better description - for both unions and their management foes, as they shift their focus from the legal landscape to the political. "The next president of the U.S. will appoint four judges for life," said Nicholas, president of the National Union of Hospital and Healthcare Employees District 1199C.
NEWS
January 15, 2016
ISSUE | UNION DUES A worrisome case The Supreme Court will have found another way to weaken the voice of working people in this country if it strikes down mandatory union fees from nonmembers in Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association ("High court questions union fees," Tuesday). While candidates and political talking heads on both sides of the aisle lament income inequality and lack of wage increases for everyone except the wealthy, the supposed watchdog that is the court seems intent on making sure it never changes.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By Chris Palmer and Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - In a vote that largely followed party lines, the state Senate on Wednesday passed a bill that would prohibit public-sector unions from using employee paycheck deductions to fund certain political activities. Sen. John Eichelberger Jr. (R., Blair), the sponsor of the so-called paycheck protection legislation, called it a "major victory" for union workers. "It protects members from being forced through the union to fund political candidates or causes they don't support," he said.
NEWS
March 21, 2015
ISSUE | UNION DUES Free riders' law Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker just signed a law that prohibits requiring workers to pay union dues ("Wisconsin becomes right-to-work state," March 10). Such measures have become popular in states under Republican control. While the rhetoric on these measures focuses on freedom and a worker's rights, the reality is somewhat different. Workers in unionized settings almost always have the option of not joining a union. However, they do have to pay representation fees - which typically equal union dues, since their salaries and benefits match those of union members and often are the hard-won products of collective bargaining.
NEWS
September 20, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
During most of her 25 years as a public schoolteacher, Jane Ladley did not have much use for the teachers' union, and now that she's retired, she's taking things one giant step further: She's suing it. On Thursday, the 61-year-old former Avon Grove district teacher and another teacher from Lancaster County filed a lawsuit against the state's largest teachers' union, the Pennsylvania State Education Association, over the handling of money they were...
NEWS
July 2, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pamela Harris is an Illinois mother who takes care of her adult son, Joshua, who has a disabling condition. And with Monday's U.S. Supreme Court decision in the case bearing her name, Harris' advocacy against public-sector unions could have far-reaching consequences for organized labor, and for a particular and growing class of workers - those who provide home care for people with disabilities. "I don't want my home being a union workplace," Harris said in an online video. She also doesn't want to pay fees to the union - and in its 5-4 decision, the court ruled she doesn't have to. "We are reviewing the decision to determine what impact [it]
NEWS
July 2, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
SAY HELLO to a "person" who's rich, can buy a lot more political free speech than you can, and who now, apparently, has found religion. Behold the ever-more-powerful 21st-century American corporation - which yesterday continued its winning ways at the U.S. Supreme Court in two landmark rulings that came at the expense of women's health services and the power of organized labor. In one of the most closely watched cases of the 2013-14 term that ended yesterday, a divided high court ruled 5-4 that businesses - for religious reasons - can refuse to pay for their workers' birth control under Obamacare.
NEWS
March 25, 2014
Third wheels As a Green Party member, I rejoice at the suggestion that independent candidates can "challenge the Democratic machine's rotten approach to leadership" ("Dropped sting hit machine," March 18). But what wasn't mentioned, or perhaps not considered, is how almost impossible it is for third parties to get on the ballot, let alone raise funds needed to compete. While Democrats can decide behind closed doors whom they will run, Greens and others need thousands of petition signatures which usually are challenged by the major parties.
NEWS
February 21, 2014
WHENEVER a member of a group goes rogue, you can be absolutely certain that other members of that group will pop up with the "bad apple" defense, as in, "Well, sure, there's a few bad apples in every bunch, but that's the exception. " It's a very legitimate maneuver and I've used it myself when, for example, people point to the Catholic Church as a nest of pedophiles. The small percentage of evil men who happen to have hijacked the Roman collar don't define the legion of saintly folk in the rectories, communities and even in places where Christians are moving targets.
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