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SPORTS
May 17, 2000 | By Sam Carchidi, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two more Bishop Eustace outfielders have made commitments to Division I baseball programs, coach Sam Tropiano said yesterday. Brett Stambolian, a leftfielder/centerfielder who missed most of last season after undergoing surgery on his left shoulder, signed with the University of Tennessee on Monday night. Mike Mooney, a Eustace rightfielder who is batting .430, recently made an oral commitment to Lehigh. That means Eustace has an all-Division I outfield. Centerfielder Tom Cuneo, who has slugged six homers this spring, committed to Penn earlier this year.
NEWS
June 9, 2011
For more than 50 years, I taught economics at two universities in Philadelphia. For some of those years, that was my only occupation. Usually, it was part-time. Teaching was one of the great loves of my life. About five years ago, I stopped teaching in disgust. I could no longer delude myself that today's students were as good as those when I started. Many do not have the intellectual equipment to be in college. Most of the others are lazy and indifferent to knowledge. Yet they expect good grades and a degree, despite severe inadequacies.
NEWS
July 4, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
At some area colleges and universities, more students than last year got that dream call: They were admitted off a waiting list. Of eight schools polled, six - Princeton, Swarthmore, Haverford, Lehigh, Bucknell, and Delaware - took more students this year than in 2012. For Princeton and Lehigh, it was a dramatic difference. Neither school used the waiting list last year; this year, Princeton took 33 students and Lehigh 65. "It's always our goal to take some students off the wait list," said Janet Lavin Rapelye, dean of admission at Princeton, who said 25 of the 33 decided to enroll.
NEWS
February 27, 2000 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Remember the old saw about high school seniors' worrying through the spring about getting thick or thin envelopes from their colleges of choice? A growing number of students now avoid the waiting game entirely. Believing that they can gain an edge in admission offices at selective colleges, more students than ever applied for early decision this school year. The process helps some snag their top choices and lets them indulge in a relatively stress-free senior year. But counselors worry that the rush to apply early may harm those who need their senior years to develop academically and find the right college fit. And some educators say early decision has become another advantage that widens the educational gap between wealthy students and their lower-income peers at public, urban schools.
NEWS
May 14, 1999 | by Bob Cooney , Daily News Staff Writer
Michel Morandais came to America from France in October with a load of basketball skills and three goals: Play a year of high school ball; Spark the interest of some college coaches; And earn a scholarship to a Division I school. Check. Check. Check. Morandais, who averaged 25 points a game for coach Darryl Gladden at Life Center Academy in Florence, signed with the University of Colorado this week. He'll join another South Jersey product, Burlington City graduate Kyle Williams, on the Buffaloes' roster.
SPORTS
November 20, 2002 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two of South Jersey's top senior high school baseball prospects will continue their college careers in the Garden State. Cherry Hill West third baseman Tim Querns has signed with Rutgers, while Bishop Eustace righthander Nick Iannucci will be attending Monmouth. Querns has hit .448, .435 and .409, respectively, in his first three varsity seasons. He has also played the last three years for the Haddon Heights American Legion team, which last season was one of eight to qualify for the state championships.
NEWS
January 28, 1989 | By NEAL PEIRCE
"The first thing we're offering these kids is hope - that you can be more than a stoop laborer or seamstress in a factory. " The words are those of Frederick Stahl, dean of this city's South Mountain Community College. But the sentiment isn't his alone: It's the growing thrust of the 1,200 stepchildren of American academia, the community colleges. For the coming American work force, increasingly black and Hispanic and Asian, community colleges are positioning themselves to be the critical "bridge" institutions, helping young people out of marooned underclass neighborhoods, into the economic mainstream.
LIVING
March 1, 1987 | By Dodge Johnson, Special to The Inquirer
You are running scared. You have aimed high for colleges, which was no problem, as long as you looked like a rising star. But your midterm grades were bad news; now you're worried that your "safety school" may not be so safe, and deadlines at some promising fallbacks have passed. Rather than apply to four-year schools that you feel aren't right, you add a two-year college to the mix, one from which some graduates' next step has been, say, Brown, the University of Pennsylvania, Northwestern or the University of Virginia.
NEWS
May 25, 1988 | By Mack Reed, Special to The Inquirer
A Delaware businessman and his wife said yesterday that they would give $200,000 in tutoring and college scholarships to 20 sixth graders at a junior high school where only a fifth of the students usually go on to college. In September, 20 students at Conrad Junior High School will be chosen for a six-year program of college preparation and scholarships, said Paul Fine, who with his wife, Gloria, offered the money. School Principal Louis Ott said the program is "going to give a lot of . . . kids the chance to go on to college who might not otherwise be able to afford it. " Conrad Junior High School educates students from blue-collar families, many of them one-parent families, and sends most of them to Wilmington High School, Ott said.
SPORTS
June 16, 1987 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three days after he rejected an offer from the Baltimore Orioles, Shawnee High pitcher Chuck Ricci signed with the American League club last night. Ricci signed for a bonus that he said was close to $50,000 - about $10,000 more than the Orioles had offered on Friday - and included provisions for any future college costs. "All I wanted was something to fall back on, in case things don't work out (with the Orioles)," Ricci said. "I think I have that now. "I've always wanted to sign.
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