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NEWS
December 16, 1996 | by William Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer
Kuang Tao Zhou, a 27-year-old grad student living in Center City, decided early this year that he wanted to go to law school. He also decided who he wanted to help him, a man he'd never met before: Mayor Rendell. Zhou, son of a wealthy Taiwanese real estate mogul, also had something that apparently got the attention of Rendell and others at City Hall: A large bank account. Beginning in March, Zhou opened his checkbook and, using money he says he'd saved up to buy a Porsche, started making political donations.
SPORTS
September 26, 2003 | By Rich Fisher INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The trickle started when the University of Iowa offered Millville's Dwayne Hendricks a scholarship on national letter-of-intent day in February. It has since become a gusher. "Being offered the year before my senior year, I was surprised," Hendricks said. "I thought that wouldn't come until my senior year, during the season. " He was only off by about seven months. Since Iowa said hello, offers from major-conference schools have been coming in waves at the Thunderbolts' defensive end. It can be an exhilarating, maddening experience for a 17-year-old, but the soft-spoken Hendricks has kept it in perspective.
NEWS
December 12, 1994 | By Bill Doherty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
His official title is men's basketball coach, but Jim Casciano wears many hats at Valley Forge Military Junior College - publicity man, placement service whiz, salesman, architect. But the way Casciano figures it, the most important aspect of his job at this time might be his public relations skills, not his ability to change defenses or diagram nifty set plays. "In just our second season, our program here at Valley Forge is still in its infancy," said Casciano, who has coached at the NCAA Division I, II and III levels.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2012 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There she sat on stage at the Irvine Auditorium, among friends and far from the political maelstrom of Washington. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, who only last week sought with colleagues to unpack the legal complexities of President Obama's health-care overhaul during three historic days of oral arguments, arrived on Thursday at the University of Pennsylvania campus to mark the opening of a new building and unspool reflections on...
NEWS
August 28, 1992
PRAISE FOR SPRING GARDEN COLLEGE CAME TOO LATE It's too bad that the recent editorial praising the efforts of Spring Garden College came upon its demise. In fact, it is ironic that your paper, and others, seemed to suddenly become aware of this 141-year-old Philadelphia institution as dirt was being tossed on its coffin. As a teacher, coach and director of athletics at the college, I was aware of the problems that eventually spelled the end of what, someday, will be recalled fondly as a treasure.
NEWS
April 20, 2011 | By Kia Gregory, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was 4 a.m. Saturday in Kandahar the last time Pfc. John Kihm talked to his mother on the phone. Deployed to the war in Afghanistan in March, Kihm wanted her to know that he had the date for his forthcoming R&R. He would be home for 15 days, starting July 8. He loved the Phillies, said his mother, Cecelia, on the phone Wednesday from the family's home in the Castor Gardens section of Northeast Philadelphia. So, she told him, she would try to get five tickets so the whole family could catch a ball game.
NEWS
July 14, 2001 | By Margie Fishman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Frank Nofer, 71, of Spring Mill, a celebrated graphic artist and watercolorist who designed a Philadelphia logo for the American Bicentennial, died Thursday at Keystone House in Wyndmoor. His representational watercolors are included in prominent private and corporate collections. In 1995, the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College honored him with a one-man retrospective exhibition. For 25 years, Mr. Nofer operated a graphic-design studio in the Old City section of Philadelphia, where he did advertising for pharmaceutical companies and amassed many awards.
NEWS
November 24, 2002 | By Leonard N. Fleming INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kevin Holloman, weak from AIDS and fighting drug addiction, nervously eyed the metal door of the Good Shepherd shelter for homeless, medically fragile men in Philadelphia. His once-handsome face was drawn, his cheeks hollowed, his complexion pale. Kevin, 32, slowly picked up his suitcase, a crate full of books, and three trash bags of clothes and carried them to the shelter door. His stomach churned that morning last December. How will they treat me? Am I going to like the people?
NEWS
October 22, 1990 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1861, the residents of Humphreysville changed the name of their town to Bryn Mawr, which is Welsh for "high hill. " Not to be outdone, the residents of Athensville changed its name to Ardmore, which is Irish for "high hill. " Darrah Street is named for a Quaker woman who eavesdropped on British army officers and tipped off George Washington about their plans. There was never a bank on Bank Street. All of this and much, much more can be found in Robert I. Alotta's extraordinary book Mermaids, Monasteries, Cherokees and Custer: The Stories Behind Philadelphia Street Names.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Perhaps because she was a woman working in a period dominated by male artists, or perhaps because Hodgkin's disease forced her to stop painting when her talent was in full flower, the late Reva Urban has been overlooked in chronologies of American painting over the last 30 years. The exhibition of her work in the Arthur Ross Gallery at the University of Pennsylvania suggests that Urban's reputation deserves to be refurbished. If these works are typical, during the early to mid-1960s she was as innovative as any of her contemporaries, and more so than most.
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