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SPORTS
September 26, 2003 | By Rich Fisher INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The trickle started when the University of Iowa offered Millville's Dwayne Hendricks a scholarship on national letter-of-intent day in February. It has since become a gusher. "Being offered the year before my senior year, I was surprised," Hendricks said. "I thought that wouldn't come until my senior year, during the season. " He was only off by about seven months. Since Iowa said hello, offers from major-conference schools have been coming in waves at the Thunderbolts' defensive end. It can be an exhilarating, maddening experience for a 17-year-old, but the soft-spoken Hendricks has kept it in perspective.
NEWS
December 12, 1994 | By Bill Doherty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
His official title is men's basketball coach, but Jim Casciano wears many hats at Valley Forge Military Junior College - publicity man, placement service whiz, salesman, architect. But the way Casciano figures it, the most important aspect of his job at this time might be his public relations skills, not his ability to change defenses or diagram nifty set plays. "In just our second season, our program here at Valley Forge is still in its infancy," said Casciano, who has coached at the NCAA Division I, II and III levels.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2012 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There she sat on stage at the Irvine Auditorium, among friends and far from the political maelstrom of Washington. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, who only last week sought with colleagues to unpack the legal complexities of President Obama's health-care overhaul during three historic days of oral arguments, arrived on Thursday at the University of Pennsylvania campus to mark the opening of a new building and unspool reflections on...
SPORTS
September 24, 2008 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bilal Bakr concedes that he often gets into good-natured trash-talking conversations with classmate Charles Watkins. Both attend Camden's Charles E. Brimm Medical Arts School, but these friends are the biggest rivals and two of South Jersey's top performers during the football season. Bakr is a two-way lineman for Woodrow Wilson, while Watkins plays for Camden and is is among the best wide receivers in the area. He has accepted a scholarship to the University of Virginia. Since their school doesn't offer football, they are able to play for Wilson and Camden, respectively.
NEWS
August 28, 1992
PRAISE FOR SPRING GARDEN COLLEGE CAME TOO LATE It's too bad that the recent editorial praising the efforts of Spring Garden College came upon its demise. In fact, it is ironic that your paper, and others, seemed to suddenly become aware of this 141-year-old Philadelphia institution as dirt was being tossed on its coffin. As a teacher, coach and director of athletics at the college, I was aware of the problems that eventually spelled the end of what, someday, will be recalled fondly as a treasure.
NEWS
December 10, 2010 | By WILL BUNCH, bunchw@phillynews.com 215-854-2957
He was the multimillionaire heir to one of the most fabluous estates in the Philadelphia region - the roughly 600 acres of rolling hills and horse stables near Newtown Square known as Foxcatcher Farm, anchored by a stately Georgian-style mansion called Liseter Hall. But in the end, the chemical-fortune scion John Eleuthere duPont died all alone, apparently of natural causes, in a western Pennsylvania prison cell where his frail and lifeless body was found at 6:55 a.m. yesterday. He was 72. DuPont's millions were powerless against the psychological demons that caused his slide into insanity - which led him to reportedly declare himself the red-robed "Dalai Lama of the United States" and finally to gun down a gold-medal-winning Olympic wrestler for no apparent reason.
NEWS
July 14, 2001 | By Margie Fishman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Frank Nofer, 71, of Spring Mill, a celebrated graphic artist and watercolorist who designed a Philadelphia logo for the American Bicentennial, died Thursday at Keystone House in Wyndmoor. His representational watercolors are included in prominent private and corporate collections. In 1995, the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College honored him with a one-man retrospective exhibition. For 25 years, Mr. Nofer operated a graphic-design studio in the Old City section of Philadelphia, where he did advertising for pharmaceutical companies and amassed many awards.
NEWS
November 24, 2002 | By Leonard N. Fleming INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kevin Holloman, weak from AIDS and fighting drug addiction, nervously eyed the metal door of the Good Shepherd shelter for homeless, medically fragile men in Philadelphia. His once-handsome face was drawn, his cheeks hollowed, his complexion pale. Kevin, 32, slowly picked up his suitcase, a crate full of books, and three trash bags of clothes and carried them to the shelter door. His stomach churned that morning last December. How will they treat me? Am I going to like the people?
NEWS
February 16, 2011 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Eleuthere du Pont, the eccentric multimillionaire who killed an Olympic wrestler in 1996 at his Newtown Square estate, was buried in his red Foxcatcher wrestling singlet, in accordance with his will. Du Pont, 72, died Dec. 9 at a prison in Somerset County, Pa., of acute aspiration pneumonia. He had spent almost 15 years behind bars for killing gold medal-winning wrestler David Schultz on the grounds of his Foxcatcher Farm estate and training facility. The petition of probate for his will, filed in Delaware County, lists the minimum value of du Pont's estate at an estimated $1 million.
NEWS
October 22, 1990 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1861, the residents of Humphreysville changed the name of their town to Bryn Mawr, which is Welsh for "high hill. " Not to be outdone, the residents of Athensville changed its name to Ardmore, which is Irish for "high hill. " Darrah Street is named for a Quaker woman who eavesdropped on British army officers and tipped off George Washington about their plans. There was never a bank on Bank Street. All of this and much, much more can be found in Robert I. Alotta's extraordinary book Mermaids, Monasteries, Cherokees and Custer: The Stories Behind Philadelphia Street Names.
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