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NEWS
April 1, 2016
ISSUE | SODA TAX AND PRE-K Consumers always pay the tab Keep one thing in mind about Mayor Kenney's proposed 3-cents-per-ounce tax on sugary drinks: consumers pay every tax; corporations merely collect them ("Two cola producers fight soda tax plan," Monday). Coca-Cola and Pepsi must pass on the cost of any tax to the consumer or go out of business. Do not be confused by supposed research that shows that not all previous taxes were passed on to consumers. All business expenses are borne by the consumer.
NEWS
March 26, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Nafeesah Muhammad calls West Chester University home these days. She lives in a dorm room with a rainbow-colored Teddy Bear beside her bed. She came to the university from Covenant House PA, a program for homeless youths in Philadelphia, determined to do more with her life. "I think college is the best thing for me," said the 21-year-old sophomore, who wants a career in social work or nursing. But it's been no easy path for the young woman, who left home and went into a shelter when she was in 10th grade.
NEWS
March 22, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
The 4- and 5-year olds who greet Christopher Rouse each morning don't put much money into his wallet, but teaching them is important enough that the 28-year-old chose to sleep in a homeless shelter for more than a month to make ends meet. "They make me feel valuable, elated," said Rouse, who this month received rental assistance to move into an apartment. "I'm happy when I wake up every day to go and roll around on the floor and get paint on my face. " As Mayor Kenney presses his quest for universal pre-K in Philadelphia, committed teachers such as Rouse represent both the hope and hurdle for whatever plan might ultimately be achieved.
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's lengthy budget impasse has caused the commission that accredits colleges regionally to question Temple and three other area universities about their ability to stay in compliance without a collective $600 million in state funding they have yet to receive. Temple, Pennsylvania State and Lincoln Universities, and the University of Pittsburgh must by April 10 provide a report on the effect the budget impasse has had on their operations, and detail their contingency plans.
NEWS
March 9, 2016
ITHACA, N.Y. - Cornell President Elizabeth Garrett, the first woman to hold that position, has died of colon cancer after less than a year on the job, the university said Monday. She was 52. Garrett, who became president of the Ivy League school on July 1, died Sunday night at her home, Cornell said. "While Beth's tenure as president has tragically been cut short, her efforts over the last eight months have set the university on a path toward continued excellence," said Robert Harrison, chairman of the Cornell board of trustees.
NEWS
March 3, 2016
ISSUE | PA. BUDGET STALEMATE Don't play politics with university students We, the student-body presidents of Pennsylvania's four state-related universities, have joined to voice the growing frustration and worries of 110,000 students. Because of gridlock in Harrisburg, Penn State, Temple, Pitt, and Lincoln University face the prospect of receiving zero dollars in state allocations this year - a $600 million shortfall ("Threat of layoffs at Penn State," Saturday). If action is not taken, tuition increases, staff layoffs, and program cuts will be needed.
NEWS
February 20, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Delaware Valley University, founded 120 years ago as a farm school that catered to Jewish men, took another leap from its past Thursday with the hiring of its first female president, an agronomist currently working as a dean at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Maria Gallo, 53, a Cornell University graduate who grew up in Port Chester, N.Y., will take the helm July 1. She replaces Joseph S. Brosnan, who announced last year that he planned to retire at the end of this school year. Gallo, dean of the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, said she was attracted by the university's mission, history, and core values, as well as its proximity to family in New York and New Jersey.
NEWS
February 18, 2016
ISSUE | COLLEGE SPORTS Odd La Salle choice Whatever happened to the classic reason for going to a college or university? Have we lost sight of the fact that we might get an education along the way? It is disconcerting that La Salle thinks the solution to its education issues lies in adding a couple of sports ("La Salle adds 2 sports to boost enrollment," Saturday). Also perplexing is that only a few area colleges have varsity teams playing women's golf and men's and women's water polo.
NEWS
February 15, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Cynthia Roberts, 62, former director of the Parent-Infant Center in West Philadelphia, and a dynamic leader in the University City community, died Wednesday, Feb. 10, of complications from pancreatic cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Ms. Roberts, along with her husband, Inquirer politics editor Daniel R. Biddle, was a fixture in the Spruce Hill neighborhood for more than 30 years - as a tireless civic worker and the driving force behind the revival of Clark Park, just a few blocks from the couple's home.
NEWS
February 12, 2016
By Omar Blaik A few weeks ago, as universities across the United States were grappling with accusations of institutional racism both current and historical, I was in South Africa working with several universities' leadership on tackling a parallel challenge: creating open campuses integrated with their host cities in a still largely segregated society. Despite the vastly different social and political context, the challenges of South Africa's higher education system are related to our own struggles with issues of race and class that are unfolding on many American campuses today.
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