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Unknown Soldier

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NEWS
May 26, 1998 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / REBECCA BARGER
With flags, revolutionary fashions and deep respect, the Sons of the American Revolution participated in ceremonies at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Washington Square. Mayor Rendell spoke, a choir sang, and Scottish bagpipes played at the park on Walnut Street between Sixth and Seventh Streets. It was sponsored by the Pennsylvania State Society-Daughters of the American Revolution. It was the last public ceremony in the park until 2000, as the park will undergo renovations under the Fairmount Park Commission.
SPORTS
June 17, 1988 | By DICK WEISS, Daily News Sports Writer
Joe Dumars is nicknamed G.I. Joe. On a team that has Adrian Dantley and Isiah Thomas as its acknowledged stars, Dumars is an unknown soldier. But last night, the quiet guard expanded his role, shot 9-for-13, scored 19 points and helped to spark the Detroit Pistons to a 104-94 victory over the Los Angeles Lakers that left Detroit one game away from the NBA championship. It was the first time in the title series that Dumars was able to hit the spot-up jumper he usually gets when opposing teams attempt to double-team Dantley.
SPORTS
August 4, 1988 | By RAY DIDINGER, Daily News Sports Writer
Mike Gostigian knows better than to look for understanding in his native land. It seems the American public, which bought into Arena Football and Hulkamania, to say nothing of night baseball at Wrigley Field, has totally ignored Gostigian's sport, the modern pentathlon. Even the hardest-core ESPN junkie would draw a blank if asked to name the five events in the modern pentathlon. (They are swimming, fencing, cross country running, horseback riding and pistol shooting). And what Trivial Pursuit freak could name the top U.S. finisher in the last two world championships of modern pentathlon?
NEWS
February 19, 1995 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / APRIL SAUL
Barry Polis and Lisa Litman, dressed as Washington and Lincoln, brought their children, Dori and Chesney Polis, to a wreath-laying at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Washington Square on Saturday.
NEWS
November 12, 1991 | Inquirer photographs by Michael Bryant
Under steel-gray skies on Veterans Day, somber ceremonies paid respect to Philadelphians who served their country. In Washington Square, Mayor Goode and others laid wreaths at the tomb of the unknown soldier of the Revolutionary War, and a memorial service was held at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial near Penn's Landing.
NEWS
November 12, 1993 | Inquirer photographs by Michael S. Wirtz
Mayor Rendell joined members of the United Veterans Council yesterday in the annual tribute to the Philadelphia veterans in ceremonies at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier of the Revolutionary War in Washington Square Park. A ceremony also was held at the Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial at Penn's Landing.
NEWS
November 12, 1996 | Inquirer photographs by Tom Gralish
Yesterday, on a chill gray day punctuated with a smattering of snowflakes, the mournful sound of a lone bugler and the sight of somber-faced men waving the Stars and Stripes reminded passersby that it was Veterans Day. At the Vietnam Veterans Memorial near Penn's Landing and the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier of the Revolutionary War in Washington Square, veterans and others gathered to pay tribute to those who have served and died in America's wars....
NEWS
February 10, 1987
Few people recognize the significance of Washington Square, just around the corner from Independence Hall. One of the five open squares designated in 1682 by William Penn's surveyor Thomas Holme, it became Philadelphia's potter's field about 1703. During the Revolutionary War in 1777-78, more than 2,000 patriot and British soldiers were buried there in unmarked graves. Since 1957 it has been the site of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier of the Revolutionary War. As we celebrate the 200th anniversary of our Constitution we will be expecting thousands of visitors to Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 30, 2010
Philadelphia is home to several monuments dedicated to the men and women who died while in military service, including the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, located in Washington Square. In 1682, William Penn's surveyor, Thomas Holme, laid out the city grid to include five planned squares, one of which was Southeast Square at Locust and Sixth Streets. For much of the 18th century, this square was a grazing land and a potter's field. During the Revolutionary War, it was used as a burial ground for fallen colonial soldiers.
NEWS
February 21, 2000 | Inquirer photographs by Bonnie Weller
Proceeding from Independence Hall to Washington Square, the Philadelphia-Continental chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution commemorated George Washington's birthday this weekend. Events started behind Independence Hall with a wreath-laying at the statue of George Washington. Afterward, in Washington Square, above, the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier was similarly honored. At right, Chun Leung Ho of Allentown photographs the ceremony. It was the first public ceremony in the square since it closed for restoration in May 1998.
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NEWS
June 1, 2016 | By Dylan Purcell, Staff Writer
Under a canopy of trees, a solemn crowd gathered Monday in Washington Square Park to celebrate Memorial Day, not by reading a book on the benches or dipping their feet in the fountain, but by honoring America's first fallen soldiers. As they have for decades, organizers from the Daughters of the American Revolution and other patriotic organizations came to Philadelphia's Tomb of the Unknown Soldier to lay a wreath in recognition of casualties of that war and others that followed.
NEWS
July 2, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
  They were anxious for news that Friday as they awaited the enemy's next move. Hunkered down on the sprawling Gettysburg battlefield where tens of thousands had fallen over two days of fierce fighting, Union soldiers wondered how their army was faring. Across the field from them, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee was preparing a final all-out attack on July 3, 1863, when Cullen "Doc" Aubrey showed up with copies of The Philadelphia Inquirer. He couldn't sell them fast enough.
NEWS
July 2, 2013 | By William C. Kashatus
On this 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, our nation celebrates the courage, valor, and personal honor of the soldiers who fought and died there from July 1 to 3, 1863. An estimated 620,000 Americans died in the Civil War, either in battle or from disease. Union losses totaled 360,222; Confederates, 258,000. And Gettysburg was the costliest battle of all, with a three-day total of 51,112 casualties on both sides. Of all the fallen heroes of the epic battle, Union soldier Amos Humiston was unique.
NEWS
May 25, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pasquale Varallo had always feared cemeteries. Then, when he was serving in the Army in 1948, he was assigned to, of all places, Arlington National Cemetery, where he guarded the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. At 2 o'clock one winter morning, Varallo, now 82 and living in Fox Chase, was on duty by himself. Somehow, at that moment, he felt his worries evaporate, and that scary repository of ghosts was transformed into safe and consecrated ground, sanctified by heroes. "I didn't feel alone," Varallo said Friday, his voice cracking.
NEWS
November 13, 2012
THE SHOOTING STARS Fancy Brigade, of which he's a member, is practicing on Sunday in the shadow of the Walt Whitman Bridge, but City Councilman Mark Squilla is with his mother inside the clubhouse on 3rd Street, lighting the Sterno to heat the eggplant parm. A few minutes later, he's behind the bar. He slides a plate of meat and cheese to the end, then takes a call on his cellphone - then another. "Yo," he greets a caller, and reaches for the soda gun. Squilla, 50, can't make Mummers practice because he's helping to launch the Nina Pennachietti Fund, named after his late grandmother, who emigrated from Italy as an orphan when she was 18. The $12,000 raised Sunday will help orphans with high school and college expenses.
NEWS
November 16, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles T. Love, 63, of Limerick, a mechanical engineer who served in a prestigious Army honor guard and drill team, died of a heart attack Thursday, Nov. 10, at Pottstown Hospital. Mr. Love's father died when he was 6, and he was raised by his widowed mother in Norristown. He dropped out of Methacton High School and earned a GED after enlisting in the Army in June 1965. In December 1965, he was assigned to the Third Infantry - the Old Guard - in Washington. Members of the Old Guard march before the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery, act as honor guards for visiting heads of state, and perform other ceremonial duties.
NEWS
July 6, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
William T. McGrath Jr., 93, of Havertown, a retired safety engineer and Little League coach, died Thursday, June 30, at home. Mr. McGrath grew up in Fairmount and graduated from Central High School. During World War II, he served in the Army with a reconnaissance squadron in the Ardennes, Rhineland, and central Europe. He was wounded while fighting in the Battle of the Bulge and received a Purple Heart. After his discharge, he joined the link-belt division of FMC Corp., of Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 31, 2011 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Under the sweltering heat, with sweat beading on Mayor Nutter's forehead within minutes of its official 10 a.m. start, the Bridesburg Memorial Day Parade went off without a hitch Monday. That was no small feat, considering that only six months ago, the parade was on "the endangered list," according to its organizers, as a lack of money threatened to break the 32-year tradition. But by sheer will, Bridesburg celebrated in full grandeur Monday, as did the city, to honor the fallen who served this country.
NEWS
May 30, 2010
Philadelphia is home to several monuments dedicated to the men and women who died while in military service, including the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, located in Washington Square. In 1682, William Penn's surveyor, Thomas Holme, laid out the city grid to include five planned squares, one of which was Southeast Square at Locust and Sixth Streets. For much of the 18th century, this square was a grazing land and a potter's field. During the Revolutionary War, it was used as a burial ground for fallen colonial soldiers.
NEWS
September 1, 2004
WE'RE TEMPTED to cry out "Burn, Baby, Burn!" when talk turns to the extinguished "eternal" flame in Washington Square. But such 1960s rhetoric hints at our age, and oversimplifies the issue. A recent op-ed piece pointed out that the eternal flame in the square, site of the Memorial to the Unknown Soldier of the American Revolution, was out and no one cared. The first part is correct. There's no flame. The second part, about nobody caring, is wrong. Since first erupting to life in 1976, the eternal flame has been anything but eternal.
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