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NEWS
April 12, 2000 | By Jason Wermers, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Lower Frederick man was arrested yesterday on charges that he ran up bills of more than $9,600 on a credit card to pay for expenses associated with a fictitious Druid church, police said. According to court documents filed in the case, Carroll David Burnham 3d, 28, set up the First USA Bank credit account in his ex-fiancee's name without her permission and listed himself as an authorized user. Detective Sgt. Peter Mastrocola said Burnham had the credit-card bills sent to a Mailboxes Etc. post office box in East Norriton in the name of the "United Paganistic Church of Druidry," for which he claimed to be a "druid priest.
NEWS
May 26, 1990
The other day we wanted to print the phone number for the Pennsylvania House of Representatives because we wanted to urge readers to give their representative a jingle and pass along their feelings about improving Pennsylvania's judicial system. We started on this task with some trepidation because a colleague from another newspaper had told us about calling Harrisburg directory assistance not long ago and being told there was no listing for the state House. Information doesn't have the office numbers for individual legislators either, so she'd ended up being connected to Gov. Casey's complaint hot line - and getting a recording.
BUSINESS
October 31, 1986 | By Neill Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania businesses soon will be paying a much lower rate to tap into Bell of Pennsylvania's directory-assistance database through virtually any computer. The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission yesterday approved sharply reduced rates for the service, which now has fewer than 10 customers, according to Bell. Beginning Sunday, customers will pay a basic monthly minimum charge of $50, which allows 6.25 hours of connect time, compared with the old minimum monthly charge of $527 or $14 per hour of connect time, whichever was more.
NEWS
May 25, 1989 | By Joshua Klein, Special to The Inquirer
A man accused of raping and indecently assaulting a 4-year-old Ardmore girl in August faces additional charges after he allegedly called the victim's father numerous times from prison and told him his daughter should change her story, police said. Wesley Alfred Jackson, 29, of Ardmore, whose trial began yesterday in Montgomery County Court, also told the father on the telephone numerous times that he should not testify at the trial, police said. Police say medical evidence showed that Jackson gave gonorrhea to the girl.
NEWS
May 8, 1993 | By Rose Simmons, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Angela Ines Schinco, 69, affectionately known as "Mrs. Gaetano" of the nationally acclaimed Gaetano's Restaurant in Center City, died Thursday at Pennsylvania Hospital. Mrs. Schinco, who lived in Center City, started in the restaurant business in 1950 when she met and married Gaetano Schinco in New York. She gave up her career as a ballroom dance teacher to work with her husband. Twenty years later, in 1970, the couple opened Gaetano's on the 700 block of Walnut Street, the city's first Northern Italian restaurant.
NEWS
November 22, 1999 | By Jason Wermers, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Lisa Joseph decided to campaign for the position of township auditor just 10 days before the Nov. 2 election - when she discovered that the Republican candidate, David A. Ziembicki, was suing the township. Joseph, also a Republican, immediately scrambled to put together a letter spelling out her qualifications and publicizing the fact that Ziembicki had two lawsuits on zoning matters pending against the Upper Salford Township Board of Supervisors. When voters arrived at the polls, they did not see Joseph's name on the ballot.
NEWS
November 3, 1995 | By Drew Weaver, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Borough Solicitor John DiPietro said yesterday that he would ask the Montgomery County District Attorney's Office to press criminal charges against former Borough Manager Charles Jacien, on grounds that Jacien had made harassing phone calls to the home of Borough Council President Gerald McTamney. According to police reports, McTamney and his wife, Mary, received several calls from Jacien between Sunday and Tuesday. Jacien has been on suspension for nearly a month and is to be terminated Monday.
NEWS
November 21, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
F. Donald Zucker was a political science teacher at Ursinus College from 1958 to 1987. He was an unsuccessful antiwar candidate in the 1960s. He filed a lawsuit against the predecessor of Verizon that went to the U.S. Supreme Court. But he was also a cellist, a composer of classical music, and a founder of musical groups in Montgomery County. "He was doing music well before he retired," said his wife, Barbara, "but he retired when he was 59 to do music full time. " On Thursday, Nov. 11, Dr. Zucker, 82, died at his home in Lower Frederick, Montgomery County, of complications from a stroke he suffered in 2007.
SPORTS
May 25, 2002 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
There won't be any fancy logos on Pat Tillman's new helmet. The Arizona Cardinals safety made a stunning revelation Thursday - he is putting his four-year NFL career on hold to join the Army, a move spurred by the military's age limit on candidates for the elite Rangers program. The 25-year-old defensive back has an unlisted number, and could not be reached for comment yesterday. But he broke the news to the Cardinals the day before and convinced them he was serious. "It's very personal, and I honor that," coach Dave McGinnis said.
NEWS
March 15, 1989 | BY MIKE ROYKO
If someone raps on your door or rings your bell, the sensible response is to ask: "Who's there?" There's nothing impolite about the question. You have a right to know who is standing outside your door, and why, before you open it. Or if you have a peephole, you can look out. If a Girl Scout is standing there with boxes of cookies, you can safely slide the bolt. On the other hand, if you see a man with a ski mask over his face, it would be wise to grab the phone and call the cops.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 21, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
F. Donald Zucker was a political science teacher at Ursinus College from 1958 to 1987. He was an unsuccessful antiwar candidate in the 1960s. He filed a lawsuit against the predecessor of Verizon that went to the U.S. Supreme Court. But he was also a cellist, a composer of classical music, and a founder of musical groups in Montgomery County. "He was doing music well before he retired," said his wife, Barbara, "but he retired when he was 59 to do music full time. " On Thursday, Nov. 11, Dr. Zucker, 82, died at his home in Lower Frederick, Montgomery County, of complications from a stroke he suffered in 2007.
NEWS
October 2, 2003 | By Julie Ann Dawson
Let me preface this rant with a confession: I've sold vacuum cleaners door to door in South Jersey for more than seven years and have worked closely with the company's telemarketing department. I understand how valuable good telemarketing can be. But . . . A telemarketer has as much right to force people to listen to a sales pitch as a door-to-door salesman has to force himself into a home. Virtually every community in the country has legislation regulating door-to-door trade, yet telemarketers have run unchecked for years.
SPORTS
May 25, 2002 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
There won't be any fancy logos on Pat Tillman's new helmet. The Arizona Cardinals safety made a stunning revelation Thursday - he is putting his four-year NFL career on hold to join the Army, a move spurred by the military's age limit on candidates for the elite Rangers program. The 25-year-old defensive back has an unlisted number, and could not be reached for comment yesterday. But he broke the news to the Cardinals the day before and convinced them he was serious. "It's very personal, and I honor that," coach Dave McGinnis said.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2000 | By Jeff Gelles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Judy Scott used to get a slew of annoying calls from telemarketers trying to sell her siding, windows, insurance - never anything she wanted. Now, she says, she gets "maybe one a week. " Scott didn't do anything radical or rude. All she did was take advantage of her rights under federal telemarketing rules. "I say, 'Please put me on the 'Do Not Call' list,' " Scott, of Ithaca, N.Y., said in a recent interview. "I've never had any problem. People are very polite, and they say 'thank you' and hang up. " Invoking the "Do Not Call" rule - actually a pair of similar regulations established in the 1990s by the Federal Communications Commission and the Federal Trade Commission - is a simple way to reduce unwanted calls from telemarketers.
NEWS
April 12, 2000 | By Jason Wermers, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Lower Frederick man was arrested yesterday on charges that he ran up bills of more than $9,600 on a credit card to pay for expenses associated with a fictitious Druid church, police said. According to court documents filed in the case, Carroll David Burnham 3d, 28, set up the First USA Bank credit account in his ex-fiancee's name without her permission and listed himself as an authorized user. Detective Sgt. Peter Mastrocola said Burnham had the credit-card bills sent to a Mailboxes Etc. post office box in East Norriton in the name of the "United Paganistic Church of Druidry," for which he claimed to be a "druid priest.
NEWS
March 6, 2000 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Scott Savage apparently does not take small steps. When he decided to cut his last significant connection to the modern world in April 1997, he took an eight-day walk from his southern Ohio home to a state office in Columbus. There, at the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles, he turned in his driver's license. And then wrote a book about it. The 207-page work, A Plain Life, is being published today by Ballantine Books. Tomorrow, the man who has chosen to live, and dress, as simply as an Amish man is to speak about his way of life at noon at the Friends Meetinghouse in Philadelphia and at 6:45 p.m. at Westtown Friends School in Chester County.
NEWS
November 22, 1999 | By Jason Wermers, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Lisa Joseph decided to campaign for the position of township auditor just 10 days before the Nov. 2 election - when she discovered that the Republican candidate, David A. Ziembicki, was suing the township. Joseph, also a Republican, immediately scrambled to put together a letter spelling out her qualifications and publicizing the fact that Ziembicki had two lawsuits on zoning matters pending against the Upper Salford Township Board of Supervisors. When voters arrived at the polls, they did not see Joseph's name on the ballot.
NEWS
November 3, 1995 | By Drew Weaver, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Borough Solicitor John DiPietro said yesterday that he would ask the Montgomery County District Attorney's Office to press criminal charges against former Borough Manager Charles Jacien, on grounds that Jacien had made harassing phone calls to the home of Borough Council President Gerald McTamney. According to police reports, McTamney and his wife, Mary, received several calls from Jacien between Sunday and Tuesday. Jacien has been on suspension for nearly a month and is to be terminated Monday.
NEWS
May 8, 1993 | By Rose Simmons, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Angela Ines Schinco, 69, affectionately known as "Mrs. Gaetano" of the nationally acclaimed Gaetano's Restaurant in Center City, died Thursday at Pennsylvania Hospital. Mrs. Schinco, who lived in Center City, started in the restaurant business in 1950 when she met and married Gaetano Schinco in New York. She gave up her career as a ballroom dance teacher to work with her husband. Twenty years later, in 1970, the couple opened Gaetano's on the 700 block of Walnut Street, the city's first Northern Italian restaurant.
NEWS
March 28, 1993 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For a young man with a yen for overseas adventure, it seemed like a better deal than the Army's offer to let him be all he could be. "Australia wants you!" read college graduate Robert Weiss of Langhorne, who dreamed of a good job overseas. "Excellent Pay, Benefits, Transportation. " For a mere $159.95, the Florida firm placing the ad assured Weiss he could get a dream job Down Under. Six months later, Weiss' prospects have gone belly up. The 23 applications he sent to Australian firms were rejected or ignored.
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