CollectionsUpholstery
IN THE NEWS

Upholstery

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 28, 2008 | By Mary Beth Breckenridge, AKRON BEACON JOURNAL
The stuff that put the gloss on your Mary Janes is now adding a little glitz to the home. Patent leather has sauntered into our living spaces, lending gleam to accent pieces, accessories and even upholstery. It's still a niche product, but some designers think it's coming into its own. In most applications, patent leather plays a supporting role, the same way the perfect piece of jewelry puts that finishing touch on an outfit, furniture designer James Stuart Duncan says. But this supporting player has the potential to steal the show.
NEWS
October 6, 2008 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeanine Burgin's back started to itch in April. Then came red patches, blisters and a burning sensation. Skin-care products only seemed to make things worse. She was in and out of hospitals, where doctors tried cortisone and other treatments - all to no avail. "It was a mystery," says Burgin, 69, who lives outside Paris. Turns out the mystery was right inside her house: her new upholstered armchair. To the litany of tainted products from overseas - milk powder, toothpaste, dog food and toys - now add textiles.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1990 | By Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
I have absolutely no intention of ever stripping, reupholstering and refinishing a vintage chaise lounge, but I plan to watch "Furniture on the Mend" every Saturday anyway. If you do have an interest in furniture restoration, either as a hobby or because you've got one piece you've been meaning to fix for years, you're especially lucky. "Furniture on the Mend," the informative and funny how-to series, returns to Channel 12 for a second season Saturday at 6 p.m. You'll know it's no ordinary PBS show from the very start, as it opens with the voice-over: " 'Furniture on the Mend' was made possible by the subscribers to TV 12. Whaddya think, this stuff grows on trees?"
NEWS
April 27, 1986 | By Al Haas, Inquirer Staff Writer
There dwells, in the suburbs of the auto industry, a brave little band of entrepreneurs who do all sorts of weird and wonderful things to the garden variety cars and trucks that roll off assembly lines. Consider, for example, LondonCoach Inc., of Mount Clemens, Mich., which recently started building an Americanized version of the famous London taxicab. What the company does is buy the tough, homely taxi from its English manufacturer, minus its diesel engine, transmission, wiring and interior.
NEWS
July 16, 2000
Stephanie Franklin-Suber said last week that she would step down in September as Mayor Street's chief of staff. She acknowledged repeatedly that in her six months on the job, she has became a conduit for controversy in the new administration. Her management style and two messy firings have been a constant source of political flare-ups. Critics complained of micromanagement. And earlier this month, Street publicly upbraided Franklin-Suber for spending $30,000 of taxpayer money on custom office furniture.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
For decades it has been a mode of transportation synonymous with wealth and fame, the vehicle of choice for Hollywood moguls and stars, pro athletes, English gentry, Queen Elizabeth and the rest of the royals. Zsa Zsa Gabor was in one when she slugged a Beverly Hills police officer after he had pulled her over and cited her for driving without a license and carrying an open container of alcohol. Hockey player Wayne Gretzky spent $250,000 on one as a wedding gift for his wife, Janet, and Colombian drug lords found the vehicles to their liking because they soaked up a lot of spare cash.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2010
IT LOOKS straightforward. An upholstered piece of furniture is little more than fabric stapled or tacked to a padded frame, right? In fact, there's far more to achieving the crisp perfection and deep comfort of upholstery. That's why purchasing a new sofa (or chair) can be so expensive, and why even re-covering a well-worn heirloom is sometimes costly. That said, quality construction may be more economical than replacing a piece every 10 years or so. Before you make the investment, it helps to understand what goes into making a well-crafted sofa.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
This was the week of the DesignPhiladelphia festival, but you would have hardly known it in the granddaddy of design districts, South Fourth Street's Fabric Row. Foot traffic was light. There were no presentations on Big Topics, no signs touting glamorous parties with beer-sipping design types. Instead, the business of cutting and selling cloth continued as usual. At Jack B. Fabrics, two generations of Blumenthals gathered on Friday afternoon around the shop's battered work table, the sole clearing in a thick forest of upright fabric bolts.
LIVING
April 22, 1994 | By Linda Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
Identifying a single, definitive style direction for home furnishings in this last decade of the 20th century is like trying to pin a name tag on a shadow. Designers and manufacturers showcased here at this week's International Home Furnishings Market tried, offering new furniture and decorative accessories in styles that ranged from casual country to formal neoclassic. And in their race to define a signature look that might carry over to the next millennium, tastemakers also revisited several important early-20th- century designs, retro-1950s looks, nostalgic Victorian and even a romanticized British colonial motif.
NEWS
November 10, 1990 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joe L'Erario and Ed Feldman, those two goofs from the neighborhood, are back fixing furniture on Channel 12. The sophomore season of their Furniture on the Mend got off to an abortive start last week when somebody broadcast the fourth episode in place of the first one. Baffled viewers came in on Part 4 of a reupholstering and refinishing project. No, it wasn't just another On the Mend joke. These characters - Feldman grew up in the Northeast, L'Erario in South Philly - will joke about anything, but as craftsmen and furniture experts, they take pains to make their projects understandable.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
This was the week of the DesignPhiladelphia festival, but you would have hardly known it in the granddaddy of design districts, South Fourth Street's Fabric Row. Foot traffic was light. There were no presentations on Big Topics, no signs touting glamorous parties with beer-sipping design types. Instead, the business of cutting and selling cloth continued as usual. At Jack B. Fabrics, two generations of Blumenthals gathered on Friday afternoon around the shop's battered work table, the sole clearing in a thick forest of upright fabric bolts.
NEWS
March 16, 2012 | By Samantha Melamed, For The Inquirer
Upholstery is a dying field - or at least that's what everyone always told John Price, a 44-year-old Mayfair resident who has been in the business since graduating from high school. After he lost his job at Old City's Regent Upholstery, where the owner retired last year after more than half a century, he almost started to believe it. So Price was surprised to get a phone call from Portside Arts Center, where students had been clamoring for several months for someone to teach them the not-quite-lost art. "I never thought there was much interest," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2010
IT LOOKS straightforward. An upholstered piece of furniture is little more than fabric stapled or tacked to a padded frame, right? In fact, there's far more to achieving the crisp perfection and deep comfort of upholstery. That's why purchasing a new sofa (or chair) can be so expensive, and why even re-covering a well-worn heirloom is sometimes costly. That said, quality construction may be more economical than replacing a piece every 10 years or so. Before you make the investment, it helps to understand what goes into making a well-crafted sofa.
NEWS
October 6, 2008 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeanine Burgin's back started to itch in April. Then came red patches, blisters and a burning sensation. Skin-care products only seemed to make things worse. She was in and out of hospitals, where doctors tried cortisone and other treatments - all to no avail. "It was a mystery," says Burgin, 69, who lives outside Paris. Turns out the mystery was right inside her house: her new upholstered armchair. To the litany of tainted products from overseas - milk powder, toothpaste, dog food and toys - now add textiles.
NEWS
March 28, 2008 | By Mary Beth Breckenridge, AKRON BEACON JOURNAL
The stuff that put the gloss on your Mary Janes is now adding a little glitz to the home. Patent leather has sauntered into our living spaces, lending gleam to accent pieces, accessories and even upholstery. It's still a niche product, but some designers think it's coming into its own. In most applications, patent leather plays a supporting role, the same way the perfect piece of jewelry puts that finishing touch on an outfit, furniture designer James Stuart Duncan says. But this supporting player has the potential to steal the show.
LIVING
September 12, 2003 | By Sharon O'Neal INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Buying our first house in June was a milestone for my husband and me. It's a wonderful thing, part of the American Dream and all that. With the shelter part taken care of, though, other needs stand out. Like the need for chairs. Since we moved from an apartment to a three-bedroom, 1840s clapboard rowhouse in Lambertville, N.J., our lack of "real" furniture has been all too apparent. It's common to have some fairly empty rooms when you move into your first house, right?
NEWS
January 12, 2001 | by Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writer
The new millennium is here, but Americans are far from ready to keep up with the Jetsons when it comes to decorating their home. In fact, the interior-design trends of the 21st century are far more likely to hark back to the simpler times of the 18th and 19th centuries than the techno-utilitarianism pictured by science fiction writers. Philadelphia-area design professionals say the harried pace of life today makes their clients cling ever more tightly to all things cozy and comfortable, rather than sleek and sterile.
NEWS
July 16, 2000
Stephanie Franklin-Suber said last week that she would step down in September as Mayor Street's chief of staff. She acknowledged repeatedly that in her six months on the job, she has became a conduit for controversy in the new administration. Her management style and two messy firings have been a constant source of political flare-ups. Critics complained of micromanagement. And earlier this month, Street publicly upbraided Franklin-Suber for spending $30,000 of taxpayer money on custom office furniture.
NEWS
May 8, 1998 | By Al Haas, INQUIRER AUTOMOTIVE WRITER
Will Rogers once said that he had never met a man he didn't like. I'm not warm and wonderful enough to be able to say that about people. But I can report that I have yet to meet a 1998 Audi I didn't like. The four- and six-cylinder A4s I drove earlier were delightful, and so is the redesigned A6 I just finished testing. The midsize A6 is basically a stretched and more luxurious A4. It has more room inside than an A4 and is aimed at people with more room inside their wallets.
LIVING
April 22, 1994 | By Linda Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
Identifying a single, definitive style direction for home furnishings in this last decade of the 20th century is like trying to pin a name tag on a shadow. Designers and manufacturers showcased here at this week's International Home Furnishings Market tried, offering new furniture and decorative accessories in styles that ranged from casual country to formal neoclassic. And in their race to define a signature look that might carry over to the next millennium, tastemakers also revisited several important early-20th- century designs, retro-1950s looks, nostalgic Victorian and even a romanticized British colonial motif.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|