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NEWS
December 13, 1993 | By NEAL R. PEIRCE
For a generation, America's universities served the military-industrial complex of the Cold War. Today, corporations continue to tap academic-based research for their own profit. But now comes the question: Could colleges and universities, into which we've poured so much of our public and private wealth, do more to help the urban regions of a nation now so deeply afflicted by rising crime and racial and class polarization? Retiring as president of Harvard in 1990, Derek Bok issued a first salvo, urging universities to transform their agendas to respond to society's new and pressing needs.
NEWS
March 3, 2003 | By Gil Medina
In our love affair with urban development, we must be careful not to overlook the downward economic spiral of New Jersey's suburbs. In the last year, New Jersey's private sector suffered the biggest drop in employment in a decade. The job outlook has been hurt particularly by drastic cutbacks at prominent suburban New Jersey companies. An overall retrenchment in the telecommunications industry has taken its toll. Major unemployment has also occurred in our manufacturing sector.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1996 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State Farm Insurance Cos.' agreement Monday to settle discrimination charges in Toledo, Ohio, might eventually benefit low- and middle-income urban homeowners in Philadelphia and South Jersey, too. In the settlement, which stemmed from a complaint filed by the National Fair Housing Alliance and a Toledo housing group, the company pledged to offer a broader range of insurance coverage and to beef up its sales and service operations in urban areas....
NEWS
February 17, 2004 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. McGreevey has found a new ally in his war on sprawl: the state Board of Public Utilities. In his administration's latest effort to steer development away from farm fields and toward cities, the utilities board has proposed regulations that would require builders to pay the full cost of gas, water and electric line extensions to new developments in rural townships. Builders would receive rebates for utility hookups in urban areas. The plan, which state officials say is one of the first of its kind, would end the long-standing system under which ratepayers provide subsidies for new water, electric and gas lines for sprawling suburbs.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
Due to flooding, Martin Luther King Boulevard has been closed by police Friday night between Montgomery Drive and Falls Bridge. Heavy rains have swollen the Schuylkill River and other waterways around the region. A National Weather Service warning is effect until 11:30 p.m. for flooding in urban areas and small streams in Philadelphia and surrounding counties. -Robert Moran
NEWS
April 5, 2010 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
It was one of those miserable, 40-degree, windy-and-rainy days so typical of March 2010. Yakima Coles had an appointment for a follow-up with her 3-month-old son, Hezekiah, who was born seven weeks premature. He was so early that he stayed in the hospital for three weeks after birth. But Coles couldn't make it that day to the Helen O. Dickens Center for Women's Health clinic at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. The trek to West Philadelphia from her Fairmount home, about 2.4 miles, was just too much.
NEWS
April 16, 1994 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
Now that he's tamed City Hall's fiscal mess, Mayor Rendell said yesterday he believes it's time for the federal government to lend a hand. In a theme he has repeated often since taking office two years ago, Rendell told reporters at the National Press Club, "Cities simply do not have enough resources to solve their economic problems themselves. " Rendell formally released his "New Urban Agenda," a package of proposals that would rewrite federal regulations to encourage investment in cities.
NEWS
June 14, 2001
In rallying for battle against suburban sprawl, no one's yet spouting Churchillian lines - something like: "We will fight them on the cornfields . . . fight 'em on the street corners. " But Pennsylvania policy makers are showing a convincing appreciation that stemming sprawl depends as much on saving urban areas as on preserving field and stream. For the most part the new compact, pedestrian-friendly communities that might make middle-class homeowners think twice about decamping for distant subdivisions aren't being built.
NEWS
May 12, 2006 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Corzine apparently will not intervene on behalf of environmental and animal-rights activists who want New Jersey to ditch its policy allowing the killing of bears that stray into urban areas. Responding to letters this week from the Humane Society and the New Jersey chapter of the Sierra Club, Corzine spokesman Anthony Coley said yesterday that the bear management plan "puts the safety and security of our families first. " "The governor is supportive of that policy," Coley said in an e-mail.
NEWS
January 29, 1988 | By Linda S. Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
Low-interest loans are available to "first-time" home buyers or to buyers in certain urban areas of New Jersey under a new $60 million tax-exempt mortgage bond issue from the New Jersey Housing and Mortgage Finance Agency. The mortgages are available at two rates: 9.25 percent for purchasers in New Jersey's 41 targeted urban areas and 9.45 percent for those buying elsewhere. The bonds will finance between 800 and 1,200 mortgages. The rates are below those offered by most private lenders in this area.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 10, 2013 | By Hillary Siegel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Picture yourself creating a city with nothing but recycled materials and your imagination to help you along the way. For the pupils at St. Lucy Day School in Juniata Park, the focus was on confidence and pride - and developing a new city in Argentina named Fresco y Limpio, meaning "fresh and clean" in Spanish. It was fashioned from mostly recycled materials, including boxes, bottle caps, broken computer parts, and newspapers. The eight St. Lucy's pupils won two awards at the Jan. 26 Future City competition, for best use of recycled materials and best use of technology in transportation.
NEWS
October 24, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer
A JUDGE RULED earlier this month that a state-approved voter ID was not needed to cast a ballot in the presidential race Nov. 6, but voter-rights advocates say state billboards about the law are confusing people. Like the 10 ads placed in predominantly Hispanic communities with a photo of a woman holding up her driver's license. "Esta jornada electoral si la tienes muestrala, " it reads in Spanish, which means: "This Election Day, if you have it, show it. " "It's causing confusion with voters and now a lot of anger in the Hispanic community," Juan Ramos, a former Philadelphia City Council member and head of the Delaware Valley Voter Registration Education Project, said at a news conference in City Hall on Monday.
NEWS
August 28, 2012
By Charles Kenny There is something viscerally repulsive about slums: the stench of open sewers, the choking smoke of smoldering trash heaps, the pools of fetid drinking water filmed with rainbow chemical spills. It makes poverty in the countryside seem almost Arcadian by comparison. The rural poor may lack nutrition, health care, education, and infrastructure; still, they do the backbreaking work of tending farms in settings that not only are more bucolic, but also represent the condition of most of humanity for most of history.
NEWS
August 2, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
August begins with another round of July-like weather, with thunderstorms expected today, followed by a possible heat wave - and more thunderstorms. "Heat index values, particularly in urban areas, could approach 100 degrees Friday through Sunday," according to the National Weather Service. Today, showers and thunderstorms could develop by midday, with "gusty winds and heavy downpours" possible. The threat could continue through the afternoon rush hour, but should diminish by nightfall.
NEWS
October 24, 2011 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
As a conservative candidate for governor, Chris Christie visited New Jersey's deeply liberal and severely impoverished urban areas. He filmed a campaign ad at Camden's infamous Tent City homeless encampment. And he released a list of 11 policy promises for "bringing back New Jersey's cities. " But nearly two years into his term, the Republican governor has fulfilled only one of those promises and has not publicly prioritized the others.  (See below for a list.) As many as four tent cities exist in Camden, hungry children are increasingly visiting the city's main soup kitchen, and the depleted police force struggles to fight rising crime.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
Due to flooding, Martin Luther King Boulevard has been closed by police Friday night between Montgomery Drive and Falls Bridge. Heavy rains have swollen the Schuylkill River and other waterways around the region. A National Weather Service warning is effect until 11:30 p.m. for flooding in urban areas and small streams in Philadelphia and surrounding counties. -Robert Moran
NEWS
April 5, 2010 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
It was one of those miserable, 40-degree, windy-and-rainy days so typical of March 2010. Yakima Coles had an appointment for a follow-up with her 3-month-old son, Hezekiah, who was born seven weeks premature. He was so early that he stayed in the hospital for three weeks after birth. But Coles couldn't make it that day to the Helen O. Dickens Center for Women's Health clinic at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. The trek to West Philadelphia from her Fairmount home, about 2.4 miles, was just too much.
NEWS
January 18, 2010
Reid comments from another era I was so relieved and happy to read your editorial "Seeing the light" Thursday. I totally agree with your sensible, enlightened interpretation of Sen. Harry Reid's remarks about Barack Obama's assets for winning the 2008 presidential race. I am an octogenerian and grew up thinking the word Negro had dignity and was very respectable. In reading Reid's remarks, and knowing his involvement in civil rights, I did not detect racism. I was dismayed when he had to get on his knees and apologize to the president and the world because the Republicans are always looking for ways to dishonor Obama and his allies.
NEWS
May 21, 2009 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The leaders of seven of the country's largest public housing agencies, including the Philadelphia Housing Authority's Carl R. Greene, have protested how the federal government plans to allocate $1 billion in economic-recovery funding. In a letter Monday to Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan, the executives challenged a decision to give first crack at the money to 1,550 agencies rated as "high performers. " The other 2,000 or so agencies will be eligible to compete for the remaining funding.
NEWS
March 23, 2009
RE THE recent op-ed by Christine Flowers responding to Attorney General Eric Holder's comments about America being a nation of cowards when it comes to race: I have nothing to say about the ways the piece criticized his comments, but why did it bring up black-on-black crime and that a majority of the people in prison are black? We will never overcome racism unless everyone admits the roles they have in it. As to accountability, if you're not racist, then you're not. If you are, then good.
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