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NEWS
August 8, 2011 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
G. STOCKTON Strawbridge looked out of the front window of his department store on East Market Street, regarded the banging pile-drivers, the grinding trucks, the dust, the torn-up asphalt and smiled. He was a happy man because the project of converting East Market Street from the dreary, shabby thoroughfare it had become was the dream of a lifetime. And who better to make that dream come true than John F. Collins? John Collins, a landscape architect, urban planner and a man who didn't hesitate to get on his knees in the dirt and plant flowers, was the head of Delta Group, which had the contract in the late '80s to restore a commercial street that had once been Philadelphia's major thoroughfare.
NEWS
July 20, 2002 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Norman Day, 69, a farm boy who became an urban planner and designer, died of cancer Tuesday at his home in St. David's. For more than 20 years, he had been principal with Norman Day Associates, which recently merged with McCormick, Taylor & Associates, an engineering and design firm. Mr. Day was also associate professor emeritus in the graduate school of fine arts at the University of Pennsylvania, where he taught in the department of city and regional planning for 30 years.
NEWS
June 13, 2001 | By William R. Macklin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William L. Rafsky, 81, who exerted sweeping influence over the life of the city during his long tenure as an urban planner, and who was a nationally recognized expert on public housing and director of the 1976 bicentennial celebration, died Monday of respiratory failure at his longtime home in East Falls. A leader of the reform movement that won a new City Charter and ended 67 years of Republican control of the mayor's office in 1951, Mr. Rafsky was a thoroughgoing Renaissance man who parlayed his appointment as executive secretary to Democratic Mayor Joe Clark into an effortless progression of high-powered positions.
NEWS
February 3, 2013
Think the public restrooms in Portland are really cool and want to bring them to Philadelphia? Now you can share this idea and your other wildest urban dreams with city planners and others in PHL2035: The Game! , an online project launched last week by the Philadelphia City Planning Commission that aims to give Philadelphians more say about the policies and projects that affect them. You can sign up to play here: http://communityplanit.org/phl2035/ The game will be available until Feb. 18. Players answer questions and encounter situations affecting the University/Southwest Planning District, which includes Kingsessing, Cedar Park, Walnut Hill, Spruce Hill, Powelton Village, Saunders Park, West Powelton, West Shore, and University City.
NEWS
May 29, 2000 | By Margie Fishman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Asserting that community values - and not the profit-driven whims of a developer - should dictate the shape of redevelopment in Willow Grove, urban planner Ronald Turner discussed the academic and practical principles of a successful revitalization plan with township commissioners last week. Days after the Montgomery County Planning Commission and Redevelopment Authority ruled that parts of downtown Willow Grove qualified for redevelopment, Turner, a planner with the Philadelphia firm Wallace, Roberts & Todd and a lecturer on city and regional planning at the University of Pennsylvania, outlined the advantages and disadvantages of high-density revitalization and village-scale design.
NEWS
September 14, 2006 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Everyone agreed yesterday that the late urban planner Ed Bacon would have loved it: official commemoration of his career at one of his proudest creations, LOVE Park in Center City. To anyone who knew him, one other thing was equally clear: Had Ed Bacon been in attendance, he would have used the occasion to buttonhole Mayor Street and other officials one more time to try to persuade them to let skateboarders back in the park. "With LOVE Park, his first-born, I don't think anybody - including Ed Bacon - had any premonition that this would become the skateboard capital of the East Coast," State Rep. Mark B. Cohen, a Philadelphia Democrat and son of the late City Councilman David Cohen, told the crowd of about 100 gathered at the northwest corner of 15th Street and John F. Kennedy Boulevard.
NEWS
June 9, 2012 | Inga Saffron
Saturday was "Grow This Block" day on Germantown's West Rockland Street, and just like last year, residents were in their front gardens spreading mushroom compost and planting flowers. It was exactly the kind of event you would expect from a couple of savvy, Gen Y marketing whizzes. Preparations were chronicled on a blog, rocklandstreet.com . Journalists were alerted in advance, donations obtained. And, naturally, the day's highlights were broadcast to the world via regular Twitter blasts.
NEWS
November 13, 2003
I DISAGREE with Richard Layman's recent op-ed, "An outsider's vision for saving Philly" (Oct. 29). Mr. Layman presents three lessons learned for Philadelphia from a Washington perspective. I am an urban planner who until recently happily lived and worked in Center City for more than five years. I currently live and work in downtown Washington. While I don't disagree with the building blocks of his strategy for revitalization - creating jobs in the city, investing in and prioritizing public transportation and capitalizing on the value of the historic housing stock - I think Mr. Layman's assessment of the Neighborhood Transformation Initiative is shortsighted.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Many people settle for a job, but there are online tools that can help you choose a career that suits your personality, education, stress tolerance, and, of course, your need for money. Stressed out? At BusinessInsider.com, there's a list of "high-paying jobs for people who don't like stress" - illustrated, strangely, with a photo of a couple nursing tall glasses of beer. The list includes jobs with annual pay averaging from about $65,000 to $186,000, the latter number belonging to orthodontists, who apparently find it relaxing to realign people's teeth and jaws.
NEWS
October 10, 2001 | By Larry Eichel
If you're not depressed enough already, let me recommend "Flight (or) Fight," a new, tough-minded look at the problems of our region published yesterday by the Metropolitan Philadelphia Policy Center. The authors of this report pull together a wide range of largely familiar statistics to produce an even gloomier-than-usual picture of how the city and its suburbs stack up against the rest of the country. This region - for all its assets, historical and geographic, educational and cultural - lags far behind its urban counterparts in population growth, job growth and success in holding on to its young.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 13, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Many people settle for a job, but there are online tools that can help you choose a career that suits your personality, education, stress tolerance, and, of course, your need for money. Stressed out? At BusinessInsider.com, there's a list of "high-paying jobs for people who don't like stress" - illustrated, strangely, with a photo of a couple nursing tall glasses of beer. The list includes jobs with annual pay averaging from about $65,000 to $186,000, the latter number belonging to orthodontists, who apparently find it relaxing to realign people's teeth and jaws.
NEWS
February 3, 2013
Think the public restrooms in Portland are really cool and want to bring them to Philadelphia? Now you can share this idea and your other wildest urban dreams with city planners and others in PHL2035: The Game! , an online project launched last week by the Philadelphia City Planning Commission that aims to give Philadelphians more say about the policies and projects that affect them. You can sign up to play here: http://communityplanit.org/phl2035/ The game will be available until Feb. 18. Players answer questions and encounter situations affecting the University/Southwest Planning District, which includes Kingsessing, Cedar Park, Walnut Hill, Spruce Hill, Powelton Village, Saunders Park, West Powelton, West Shore, and University City.
NEWS
June 9, 2012 | Inga Saffron
Saturday was "Grow This Block" day on Germantown's West Rockland Street, and just like last year, residents were in their front gardens spreading mushroom compost and planting flowers. It was exactly the kind of event you would expect from a couple of savvy, Gen Y marketing whizzes. Preparations were chronicled on a blog, rocklandstreet.com . Journalists were alerted in advance, donations obtained. And, naturally, the day's highlights were broadcast to the world via regular Twitter blasts.
NEWS
August 8, 2011 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
G. STOCKTON Strawbridge looked out of the front window of his department store on East Market Street, regarded the banging pile-drivers, the grinding trucks, the dust, the torn-up asphalt and smiled. He was a happy man because the project of converting East Market Street from the dreary, shabby thoroughfare it had become was the dream of a lifetime. And who better to make that dream come true than John F. Collins? John Collins, a landscape architect, urban planner and a man who didn't hesitate to get on his knees in the dirt and plant flowers, was the head of Delta Group, which had the contract in the late '80s to restore a commercial street that had once been Philadelphia's major thoroughfare.
NEWS
June 3, 2011 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Here's a little thought experiment to get you steamed: What if the celebrated urban planner Edmund Bacon had embraced the prevailing ideology of the 1960s and leveled Society Hill, replacing its blocks of outmoded, colonial-era townhouses with sleek modern high-rises for middle-class families? Would Philadelphia be a livelier, more successful place today? Frankly, it's hard to imagine that wiping out one of today's most desirable urban neighborhoods in the city, if not the country, could have benefited anyone, rich or poor.
NEWS
January 18, 2011 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vincent T. Cangelosi, 56, of Haddon Heights, an urban planner who developed many residential projects in South Jersey for low-income families and the elderly, died of pancreatic cancer on Saturday, Jan. 15, at his home. After moving to Blackwood to attend Camden County College and then to Camden to finish his degree in urban planning at Rutgers University, Mr. Cangelosi developed a passion for the revitalization of small cities. From the time he started working in 1977 at the Camden County Community Development office, Mr. Cangelosi garnered a reputation for being able to plan affordable-housing projects that would come to fruition, said those who knew him. During his 25 years in urban planning, Mr. Cangelosi was most proud of the Mill Block housing renovations in Gloucester City and a Ferry Station housing project in Camden, said his son Nick.
NEWS
May 5, 2010 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
In the four decades that the urban planner Gray Smith made Philadelphia his home, he never lost his peculiar Southern twang, which resembled a pickup truck reversing on gravel. He also never hesitated to use that voice to speak out on behalf of dozens of neighborhood, preservation, and social causes, and he delighted when opponents denounced him as a gadfly. That voice went silent Thursday, April 29, when Mr. Smith suffered a heart attack. Mr. Smith, 69, will be eulogized Wednesday, May 5. Mr. Smith's career as a community activist began almost as soon as he arrived in Philadelphia in 1967 to work as an architect, and it continued until his death.
NEWS
August 26, 2007 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Navy pilot from New Orleans didn't know the community organizer from Boston, who didn't know the retail strategist from Fort Worth, who didn't know the urban planner from Chester County, who didn't know the writer from Miami, who didn't know the artist from Bucks County. But in June last year, they found themselves at the Old Brick Church in Fishtown with a shared purpose: getting a group called Neighbors Allied for the Best Riverfront off the ground. Ever since, these organizers have been vocal opponents of building casinos along the Delaware River.
NEWS
September 14, 2006 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Everyone agreed yesterday that the late urban planner Ed Bacon would have loved it: official commemoration of his career at one of his proudest creations, LOVE Park in Center City. To anyone who knew him, one other thing was equally clear: Had Ed Bacon been in attendance, he would have used the occasion to buttonhole Mayor Street and other officials one more time to try to persuade them to let skateboarders back in the park. "With LOVE Park, his first-born, I don't think anybody - including Ed Bacon - had any premonition that this would become the skateboard capital of the East Coast," State Rep. Mark B. Cohen, a Philadelphia Democrat and son of the late City Councilman David Cohen, told the crowd of about 100 gathered at the northwest corner of 15th Street and John F. Kennedy Boulevard.
NEWS
June 29, 2005 | By David Barron
To many, the headlines about Thursday's Supreme Court decision in Kelo vs. City of New London - "Court Authorizes Seizure of Homes" - must sound un-American. But in upholding a city's right to take private property as part of an economic redevelopment plan, the court affirmed principles as old as the Constitution. There should be no doubt that the Constitution permits the government to take private property without consent in some instances. The very same provision of the Constitution that protects the right to private property - the Fifth Amendment - also provides that the government may "take" private property for "public use" so long as it pays "just compensation.
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