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Urban Policy

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NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Dan Balz, Washington Post
A national urban policy would not have saved Detroit, but the city's bankruptcy filing Thursday was a vivid reminder of how the problems of America's cities have long ceased to be a focal point of the political debate in presidential campaigns or the policy debate in Washington. The closest the candidates came in 2012 to the specific topic of the cities was the contentious argument between President Obama and Mitt Romney over the federal bailout of the auto industry. Obama pummeled Romney for an article he had written for the New York Times in late 2008 opposing federal intervention.
NEWS
May 12, 1992 | BY CAL THOMAS
The Bush Administration is right to blame the failed policies of the Great Society for contributing to the conditions that led to the riots in Los Angeles. Those policies have created a subculture of dependency and done little to solve the problems of the urban poor. But Bush must go further than bashing the agenda of a long-dead Democratic President. As Housing and Urban Development Secretary Jack Kemp likes to say, "You don't beat a thesis with an antithesis. You beat it with a better thesis.
NEWS
April 11, 1993 | By DAVID S. BRODER
When Sen. Bill Bradley (D., N.J.) and Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Henry Cisneros got together last Wednesday for their first substantive discussion since the Clinton administration began, it was two of the brightest men in Washington talking about one of the nation's greatest needs - a sensible urban policy. They did not spend much time on Cisneros' piece of President Clinton's "economic stimulus" package, the $2.5 billion of extra Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)
NEWS
May 29, 1997 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
With campaign days running out, the three Democratic candidates for governor yesterday shifted their attention from suburbia's tax woes and focused, at least for a day, on the needs of the cities - the party's traditional power base. During an informal luncheon here with Democratic mayors, the three promised a wide array of state assistance for New Jersey's urban areas and uniformly blasted Gov. Whitman, who they said has ignored the cities during her term in office. "This governor has had no urban policy, unless you can substitute photo opportunities for a policy," said candidate Michael Murphy, the former Morris County prosecutor.
NEWS
March 16, 2016
Former Mayor Michael Nutter is having no trouble filling his time since leaving office. His plate got fuller Monday, when the University of Chicago announced his appointment as a visiting fellow at the Institute of Politics. Nutter will be on campus this spring for a weeklong series focusing on governing in urban America. His perspective from inside City Hall will touch on topics such as how "crisis management can upend a mayoralty, the challenges of institutionalizing change after an election, and what the outcome of the 2016 presidential election will mean for America's big cities," according to a news release.
NEWS
October 20, 2008 | By CATHERINE LUCEY, luceyc@phillynews.com 215-854-4172
During recent debates, TV advertisements and public appearances, presidential candidates Barack Obama and John McCain have largely focused on their plans for the ailing economy. But beyond tax breaks and mortgage relief, what are their plans for people living in cities like Philadelphia? What would Democrat Obama or Republican McCain do to fight crime, reduce poverty or improve transit and public housing? While neither candidate is talking much about urban policy, there are stark differences between their proposals.
NEWS
July 15, 1992 | by Nicole Weisensee, Special to the Daily News
It's not much, but it's something. Frustrated by their inability to get a forum before the convention about what they say is an unimpressive urban policy plank in the Democratic platform, a group of Philadelphia lawmakers used the only tool they had left. They voted against the official platform last night. "I'm not satisfied that the platform is as strong on the issues that I support," said state Rep. Vincent Hughes, D-Philadelphia. "I think that message needs to be sent," he said.
NEWS
October 20, 2008
Here's where the two major presidential candidates stand on major urban issues: Big Picture: Plans to create a White House Office on Urban Policy to develop strategies for big cities and oversee federal funding to urban communities. Guns: Supports making permanent an assault-weapons ban, which expired several years ago. He would repeal the Tihart Amendment, which restricts federal authorities from sharing gun-trace information with local law enforcement. Police: Supports more funding for COPS (Community Oriented Policing Services)
NEWS
August 1, 2001
By Harold Jackson I needed to be in Trenton one day last week. Driving down Perry Street and later walking along East State and South Broad Streets, I noticed several abandoned buildings and the occasional panhandler and thought the capital city in those respects reminded me of Camden. Both New Jersey cities are like a number of other urban areas I have spent time in during the last five years, including Philadelphia, Baltimore, Kansas City, St. Louis, Washington and Birmingham, Ala. None has solved the multiple ailments - poverty, crime, disease, grime, etc. - that have prompted many Americans to choose the suburbs to live and - when they have a choice - to work.
NEWS
December 24, 1988 | By NEAL R. PEIRCE
"Boy, it'll be a breath of fresh air. Even if he's wrong, I'd rather have an activist than a caretaker. " That reaction from Marshall Kaplan, a Carter-era HUD official, reflects the cautious optimism many urban experts are expressing over Jack Kemp's appointment as secretary of Housing and Urban Development. Contrasted to Samuel R. Pierce's somnolent leadership of HUD and the burying of urban-policy concerns under President Reagan, the strong-minded, ebullient Kemp might just elevate debate about cities and their needs to a place on America's agenda they've not enjoyed for years.
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NEWS
March 16, 2016
Former Mayor Michael Nutter is having no trouble filling his time since leaving office. His plate got fuller Monday, when the University of Chicago announced his appointment as a visiting fellow at the Institute of Politics. Nutter will be on campus this spring for a weeklong series focusing on governing in urban America. His perspective from inside City Hall will touch on topics such as how "crisis management can upend a mayoralty, the challenges of institutionalizing change after an election, and what the outcome of the 2016 presidential election will mean for America's big cities," according to a news release.
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Dan Balz, Washington Post
A national urban policy would not have saved Detroit, but the city's bankruptcy filing Thursday was a vivid reminder of how the problems of America's cities have long ceased to be a focal point of the political debate in presidential campaigns or the policy debate in Washington. The closest the candidates came in 2012 to the specific topic of the cities was the contentious argument between President Obama and Mitt Romney over the federal bailout of the auto industry. Obama pummeled Romney for an article he had written for the New York Times in late 2008 opposing federal intervention.
NEWS
June 11, 2010 | By CATHERINE LUCEY, luceyc@phillynews.com 215-854-4172
Hobnobbing in Chicago with White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel. Speechifying in Louisville, Ky., and Cambridge, Mass. Perching in front-row seats for announcements from President Obama. Since taking office, Mayor Nutter has maintained an active out-of-town schedule that must seem like a walk in the park compared to the grim budget briefings and union negotiations he deals with at home. "I think he's a very good salesman for the city," said political consultant Larry Ceisler.
NEWS
July 15, 2009 | By Cynthia Burton INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Republican gubernatorial nominee Christopher J. Christie, in a play for Democratic and independent voters, announced a "Bringing Back Our Cities" campaign plank yesterday in Camden and two other cities. At the Bethel Deliverance Church on Kaighns Avenue, he said: "If we don't bring our cities back in this state, economically and spiritually, we do not have a hope of this state being as good as it can be. " On a day a new poll showed his lead over Gov. Corzine growing, Christie argued that revitalizing cities would help kick-start the state's economy.
NEWS
December 16, 2008 | By Harry K. Schwartz
Why is it that the secretary of Housing and Urban Development always seems to be seated farthest from the president at the cabinet table? Although the secretary of Veterans Affairs may get even less respect, the HUD post has been marginalized almost from the day of its creation. Indeed, when Ronald Reagan famously failed to recognize his HUD secretary at a White House luncheon ("Hello, Mr. Mayor," he said), the general reaction was more amusement than shock. And now, with the early designation of Gen. Eric Shinseki to head Veterans Affairs, that department seems to have been bumped up several notches.
NEWS
October 20, 2008 | By CATHERINE LUCEY, luceyc@phillynews.com 215-854-4172
During recent debates, TV advertisements and public appearances, presidential candidates Barack Obama and John McCain have largely focused on their plans for the ailing economy. But beyond tax breaks and mortgage relief, what are their plans for people living in cities like Philadelphia? What would Democrat Obama or Republican McCain do to fight crime, reduce poverty or improve transit and public housing? While neither candidate is talking much about urban policy, there are stark differences between their proposals.
NEWS
October 20, 2008
Here's where the two major presidential candidates stand on major urban issues: Big Picture: Plans to create a White House Office on Urban Policy to develop strategies for big cities and oversee federal funding to urban communities. Guns: Supports making permanent an assault-weapons ban, which expired several years ago. He would repeal the Tihart Amendment, which restricts federal authorities from sharing gun-trace information with local law enforcement. Police: Supports more funding for COPS (Community Oriented Policing Services)
NEWS
August 24, 2008 | Norman J. Glickman and Robert H. Wilson
Norman J. Glickman is University Professor, Rutgers University Robert H. Wilson is Mike Hogg Professor of Urban Policy, University of Texas-Austin Lyndon Johnson, a rural Texan, was an unlikely yet passionate advocate for America's cities. Like the man himself, his urban efforts were big, bold and sweeping. He became president amid political turmoil and urban disturbances. Instead of avoiding controversial urban problems, he did what good leaders do: He tried to solve them.
NEWS
July 1, 2008
ADMIT IT: When you hear the word "urban policy," even if you live in the city, don't you feel tired? Over the years, the word "urban" has come to reflect the seemingly intractable problems - poverty, crime, the grime of crumbling infrastructure - identified with the nation's core cities, including this one. If your image of this country is of a vastly rural nation dotted with a handful of large urban centers, get ready to have your mental maps...
NEWS
March 8, 2008 | By Chris Satullo, Inquirer Columnist
Armageddon has been scheduled. April 22. Pennsylvania. Hillary vs. Barack. Keep an eye on the skies. Any moment, battalions of national political journalists will begin parachuting into our commonwealth, looking for a couple of "real people" they can interview outside colorful landmarks. Next, they'll make their obligatory call to resident political guru G. Terry Madonna of Franklin and Marshall College (a sharp guy, but soon to be the most overquoted sage this side of Kahlil Gibran)
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