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Urban Poverty

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NEWS
August 28, 2012
By Charles Kenny There is something viscerally repulsive about slums: the stench of open sewers, the choking smoke of smoldering trash heaps, the pools of fetid drinking water filmed with rainbow chemical spills. It makes poverty in the countryside seem almost Arcadian by comparison. The rural poor may lack nutrition, health care, education, and infrastructure; still, they do the backbreaking work of tending farms in settings that not only are more bucolic, but also represent the condition of most of humanity for most of history.
NEWS
March 25, 1991 | By GEORGE F. WILL
Before the City of New Orleans and other passenger trains got the disappearing railroad blues, the Illinois Central was, for hundreds of thousands of rural blacks, a steel highway to the promised land. They left from small depots in the Deep South and arrived at Chicago's cavernous 12th Street Station. There they turned a few miles south toward what became the largest concentration of black Americans. Now comes The Promised Land, Nicholas Lemann's riveting report on the Mississippi-to-Chicago component of the northward migration of 6.5 million blacks, one of the world's largest and swiftest migrations.
NEWS
December 10, 2001 | By Steve Esack INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As a professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Brian Strom has met his share of smart, educated, ambitious, dedicated people. But, the Penn Valley resident had never met a Rhodes Scholar. Now, he and his wife, Lani, are the proud parents of one. Their daughter, Shayna Strom, a senior at Yale University and 1998 graduate of the private Baldwin School in Bryn Mawr, was one of 32 U.S. college students selected as a Rhodes Scholars yesterday, the scholarship trust announced.
NEWS
January 3, 1992
HAVEN'T WE HEARD THIS STORY SOMEWHERE BEFORE? Stowe Village, a public housing project at the north end of Hartford, is a four-block hellhole of rundown three- and four-story brick apartment buildings, concrete, graffiti and yellow grass. The project is home to some 600 families, about 4,000 people altogether. Only one out of three men has a job. . . . "We have our own Soweto," says (Hartford City Manager Gene) Shipman. . . . "We look at black townships in South Africa and become outraged, but you need go no farther than 20 blocks from downtown Hartford to see the same kind of living conditions.
NEWS
June 27, 2007 | Associated Press
Elijah Anderson, one of the nation?s most influential scholars in the field of urban inequality, will become professor of sociology at Yale University on July 1, university officials said Wednesday. "Professor Anderson is the most respected and accomplished sociologist of the black urban community," said Yale Provost Andrew D. Hamilton. "We are thrilled that the leading expert in an area of such social and political importance will be conducting his research and teaching at Yale. " Anderson, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania, was the author of the classic work "A Place on the Corner: A Study of Black Street Corner Men. " Anderson has won numerous awards and written and edited numerous articles, books, book chapters and reports on the black experience, including the introduction to the republication of "The Philadelphia Negro," by W.E.B.
NEWS
December 30, 1990 | By DAVID R. BOLDT
In the midst of the recent storm over an editorial we ran discussing the new contraceptive Norplant, I got a letter from attorney Mark Squires, a former student of mine at Temple University. Squires, as is his custom, got right to the point. Over the years, he wrote, he had enjoyed needling me for my "knee-jerk liberalism," and he was now "greatly amused by your being portrayed as a racist pig. " I don't know why I appreciated that letter so much. Perhaps it was because I was glad somebody was enjoying the episode.
NEWS
August 3, 2006 | By William DiMascio
In the hysteria of the crime wave of 2006, officials are tripping over themselves searching for immediate solutions to an intractable problem. Nothing - save our unwillingness to do anything that might hamper the free flow of arms - is sacred. In the meantime, the homicide rate is rising faster than the temperature. A siege mentality has taken hold and we edge toward police-state tactics. Now we want to let police frisk parolees at any time, even if there is no probable cause.
NEWS
January 24, 1990
Robert W. O'Donnell, the new speaker of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, now faces one of the most intricate challenges imaginable for a politician. Fortunately, he has demonstrated in his rise to the speakership that he may be artful enough to bring it off. The challenge is this: to find a way to bridge the ever-widening gap between the amount of money the state legislature feels it can afford to pay for social service programs it has mandated in Philadelphia (and other cities)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2009 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
The good stuff about Mark Webber's Explicit Ills : Although a major theme is urban poverty, his Philadelphia indie manages mostly to dodge film cliches. The boy and his single mom, the enterprising African American couple, the hipster and the art student - they ramble and shamble through some of the city's derelict streets like real people, not (political) cartoons. The conversations on the bus, the exchanges at the corner, have a refreshing naturalness about them. And there's a graceful, oddball humor, cutting nicely against the grain of Webber's more strident socioeconomic message.
NEWS
December 5, 2005 | By ROBERT S. NIX
Arecent op-ed about the deadly youth violence in certain sections of Philadelphia reminded the writer of William Golding's novel "Lord of the Flies. " Perhaps a better analogy is to the Anthony Burgess classic "A Clockwork Orange" - a disturbing vision of a future society where drug-addled teen gangs, adrift by day in an impersonal society in which they have no stake, rule the streets at night with shockingly ruthless "ultraviolence. " In certain sections of Philadelphia, that future is now. Retailers near a South Philadelphia area where some of this deadly youth violence is concentrated lament that the area turns into a danger zone when the sun sets.
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NEWS
May 21, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Say poverty in the Philadelphia area, and it conjures images of North Philadelphia or Kensington, not the suburbs. But the suburbs on both sides of the Delaware River are becoming steadily poorer, part of a national trend that confounds long-held beliefs that life is always better in greener pastures beyond urban limits. "People have this cliched notion of poverty being based in the inner city," said Adele LaTourette, director of the New Jersey Anti-Hunger Coalition, which has offices in Trenton and North Jersey.
NEWS
August 28, 2012
By Charles Kenny There is something viscerally repulsive about slums: the stench of open sewers, the choking smoke of smoldering trash heaps, the pools of fetid drinking water filmed with rainbow chemical spills. It makes poverty in the countryside seem almost Arcadian by comparison. The rural poor may lack nutrition, health care, education, and infrastructure; still, they do the backbreaking work of tending farms in settings that not only are more bucolic, but also represent the condition of most of humanity for most of history.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2009 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
The good stuff about Mark Webber's Explicit Ills : Although a major theme is urban poverty, his Philadelphia indie manages mostly to dodge film cliches. The boy and his single mom, the enterprising African American couple, the hipster and the art student - they ramble and shamble through some of the city's derelict streets like real people, not (political) cartoons. The conversations on the bus, the exchanges at the corner, have a refreshing naturalness about them. And there's a graceful, oddball humor, cutting nicely against the grain of Webber's more strident socioeconomic message.
NEWS
June 27, 2007 | Associated Press
Elijah Anderson, one of the nation?s most influential scholars in the field of urban inequality, will become professor of sociology at Yale University on July 1, university officials said Wednesday. "Professor Anderson is the most respected and accomplished sociologist of the black urban community," said Yale Provost Andrew D. Hamilton. "We are thrilled that the leading expert in an area of such social and political importance will be conducting his research and teaching at Yale. " Anderson, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania, was the author of the classic work "A Place on the Corner: A Study of Black Street Corner Men. " Anderson has won numerous awards and written and edited numerous articles, books, book chapters and reports on the black experience, including the introduction to the republication of "The Philadelphia Negro," by W.E.B.
NEWS
August 3, 2006 | By William DiMascio
In the hysteria of the crime wave of 2006, officials are tripping over themselves searching for immediate solutions to an intractable problem. Nothing - save our unwillingness to do anything that might hamper the free flow of arms - is sacred. In the meantime, the homicide rate is rising faster than the temperature. A siege mentality has taken hold and we edge toward police-state tactics. Now we want to let police frisk parolees at any time, even if there is no probable cause.
NEWS
December 5, 2005 | By ROBERT S. NIX
Arecent op-ed about the deadly youth violence in certain sections of Philadelphia reminded the writer of William Golding's novel "Lord of the Flies. " Perhaps a better analogy is to the Anthony Burgess classic "A Clockwork Orange" - a disturbing vision of a future society where drug-addled teen gangs, adrift by day in an impersonal society in which they have no stake, rule the streets at night with shockingly ruthless "ultraviolence. " In certain sections of Philadelphia, that future is now. Retailers near a South Philadelphia area where some of this deadly youth violence is concentrated lament that the area turns into a danger zone when the sun sets.
NEWS
August 12, 2002
Poverty, character and morality of welfare Robert Tracinski's attack on "chronic welfare recipients" demonstrates a spectacular ignorance of the issues surrounding urban poverty ("Debate morality of welfare," Aug. 1). His column reads like he is a scared commuter forced into the unfamiliar streets of North Philadelphia by some smash-up on Interstate 95. As Tracinski's knuckles grow white around his steering wheel, he fixes his eyes straight ahead, regurgitates his regular breakfast of "responsibility" and "character," and misses the point completely.
NEWS
December 10, 2001 | By Steve Esack INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As a professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Brian Strom has met his share of smart, educated, ambitious, dedicated people. But, the Penn Valley resident had never met a Rhodes Scholar. Now, he and his wife, Lani, are the proud parents of one. Their daughter, Shayna Strom, a senior at Yale University and 1998 graduate of the private Baldwin School in Bryn Mawr, was one of 32 U.S. college students selected as a Rhodes Scholars yesterday, the scholarship trust announced.
NEWS
March 5, 2000
Each Sunday from now until the Republican National Convention, the Commentary Page will run the responses of Republicans to the question above, alternating weeks between rank-and-file party members and elected and party officials. GOV. TOM RIDGE PENNSYLVANIA The national Republican Party must paint a picture of the America we want to create - and take it to every region and every voter. Too often, we have forfeited issues people care about - issues such as the environment, urban poverty and education.
NEWS
February 19, 1995 | By Dan Hardy and Anthony R. Wood, FOR THE INQUIRER
A cardboard file box sits in the Chester Finance Department, filled with the hundreds of unpaid bills. Some are as much as eight months old, and the city doesn't have a clue when it might be able to make good on them. City officials don't even have a comprehensive list of whom they owe money. They do, however, know how much they owe - $4.3 million. That represents 18 percent of the entire city budget. Chester, the state's 12th-largest city, is deeply in the red and, in a very real sense, losing control.
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