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Urinary Tract

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NEWS
November 20, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Recurrent urinary tract infections that plague many women may be caused by a single infection that's never cured, even by antibiotics, say researchers using new imaging techniques to study how bacteria attack the bladder. "We discovered that cells that line the bladder have a built-in defense mechanism that kicks in when bacteria attach to them - they commit suicide and slough off," said Scott Hultgen, a microbiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, head of the research team.
NEWS
May 22, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Laser beams can smash stones stuck in the body's urinary tract and, coupled with another new high-technology therapy, should nearly eliminate the need for kidney stone surgery, a researcher reported yesterday. The laser technique is the second significant advance in the treatment of kidney stones in recent years. A machine called the lithotripter, which uses shock waves to break up stones, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1984. The lithotripter could potentially be used to treat about half of the 200,000 Americans who otherwise would need surgery to take out trapped stones.
NEWS
May 31, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
FAX OF LIFE If there's a 21st-century remake of the Marvelettes' classic 1961 rock song, you may be doo-wopping to the strains of "Please Mr. Faxman. " Fax machines could one day replace the U.S. Postal Service for personal mail, say researchers at Technology Futures. Largely because of people working at home, the management-consulting firm based in Austin, Texas, predicts that 60 million households will contain a fax machine by the year 2000, American Demographics magazine reports.
NEWS
May 20, 2010 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seated among boxes filled with 41 years of medical records of the late Philadelphia Police Officer Walter T. Barclay, forensic pathologist Ian Hood defended his finding Wednesday that Barclay died in 2007 from a 1966 bullet wound. Testifying for the prosecution in the murder trial of William J. Barnes, the 74-year-old burglar convicted of shooting the then-rookie officer, Hood said the decades-long period from Barclay's shooting to his death was irrelevant. "There was no intervening cause," Hood told the Common Pleas Court jury, referring to the urinary tract infection that killed Barclay, 64, on Aug. 19, 2007.
NEWS
May 20, 2010 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seated among boxes filled with 41 years of medical records of the late Philadelphia Police Officer Walter T. Barclay, forensic pathologist Ian Hood defended his finding Wednesday that Barclay died in 2007 from a 1966 bullet wound. Testifying for the prosecution in the murder trial of William J. Barnes, the 74-year-old burglar convicted of shooting the then-rookie officer, Hood said the decades-long period from Barclay's shooting to his death was irrelevant. "There was no intervening cause," Hood told the Common Pleas Court jury, referring to the urinary tract infection that killed Barclay, 64, on Aug. 19, 2007.
NEWS
May 19, 2010 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seated among boxes filled with 41 years of medical records of the late Philadelphia police officer Walter T. Barclay, forensic pathologist Ian Hood defended his finding Wednesday that Barclay died from a 1966 bullet wound. Testifying for the prosecution in the murder trial of William J. Barnes - the 74-year-old burglar convicted of shooting the then-rookie police officer, Hood said the 41-year period from Barclay's shooting to death was irrelevant. "There was no intervening cause," Hood told the Philadelphia Common Pleas Court jury, referring to the urinary tract infection that killed Barclay Aug. 19, 2007 at age 64. By death Barclay, paralyzed below the waist, had spent 41 years in wheelchairs and nursing home beds, plagued by a life of painful muscle spasms, bedsores and bladder infections.
NEWS
May 1, 2012 | Mitchell Hecht
Question: My triglyceride level was 419 and my doctor recommended that I take the drug Tricor to lower it. Since I feel fine, do I need to take it? Why is an elevated triglyceride level bad? What raises the triglycerides? Answer: Triglycerides are a part of the total cholesterol in your blood. For years, we weren't quite sure whether or not treating triglycerides made a difference in preventing heart disease. High levels over 400 usually got treated, while numbers between 200 and 400 were treated at the doctor's discretion.
LIVING
October 18, 1988 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
A life-threatening defect in the urinary tract was creating destructive pressure on the kidneys and hurting the lungs. An operation, doctors determined, was the only hope - but the patient had not yet been born. At stake was the survival of a 21-week-old fetus. So, doctors cut open the mother's uterus, pulled out the bottom half of the developing baby and operated to correct the problem. The fetus was then returned to the womb. Three months later, a boy was born.
LIVING
January 31, 1994 | By Ron Gasbarro, FOR THE INQUIRER
The antibiotics your doctor prescribes for you used to be relatively inexpensive. But with the introduction of some newer compounds, don't be surprised if you are spending anywhere from $50 to $100 to get your prescription filled. "Sometimes the cost of an antibiotic takes a customer's breath away," says Gary Renhardt, pharmacy director of Little Rock, Ark.-based Harvest Foods. "I have to admit, I've handed back more than a few prescriptions to customers who said they were going right home to call their doctor.
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NEWS
May 1, 2012 | Mitchell Hecht
Question: My triglyceride level was 419 and my doctor recommended that I take the drug Tricor to lower it. Since I feel fine, do I need to take it? Why is an elevated triglyceride level bad? What raises the triglycerides? Answer: Triglycerides are a part of the total cholesterol in your blood. For years, we weren't quite sure whether or not treating triglycerides made a difference in preventing heart disease. High levels over 400 usually got treated, while numbers between 200 and 400 were treated at the doctor's discretion.
NEWS
December 13, 2010
Study casts doubt on cranberry juice's role in urinary health If you've been chugging cranberry juice to ward off urinary tract infections, a new study will bum you out. Cranberry juice was no better at preventing the infections than a red imitation that lacked proanthocyanidin, the cranberry component believed to battle the bacteria that cause them. The University of Michigan study, published in the January issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases, recruited 319 female students who had been diagnosed with a urinary tract infection.
NEWS
May 20, 2010 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seated among boxes filled with 41 years of medical records of the late Philadelphia Police Officer Walter T. Barclay, forensic pathologist Ian Hood defended his finding Wednesday that Barclay died in 2007 from a 1966 bullet wound. Testifying for the prosecution in the murder trial of William J. Barnes, the 74-year-old burglar convicted of shooting the then-rookie officer, Hood said the decades-long period from Barclay's shooting to his death was irrelevant. "There was no intervening cause," Hood told the Common Pleas Court jury, referring to the urinary tract infection that killed Barclay, 64, on Aug. 19, 2007.
NEWS
May 20, 2010 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seated among boxes filled with 41 years of medical records of the late Philadelphia Police Officer Walter T. Barclay, forensic pathologist Ian Hood defended his finding Wednesday that Barclay died in 2007 from a 1966 bullet wound. Testifying for the prosecution in the murder trial of William J. Barnes, the 74-year-old burglar convicted of shooting the then-rookie officer, Hood said the decades-long period from Barclay's shooting to his death was irrelevant. "There was no intervening cause," Hood told the Common Pleas Court jury, referring to the urinary tract infection that killed Barclay, 64, on Aug. 19, 2007.
NEWS
May 19, 2010 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seated among boxes filled with 41 years of medical records of the late Philadelphia police officer Walter T. Barclay, forensic pathologist Ian Hood defended his finding Wednesday that Barclay died from a 1966 bullet wound. Testifying for the prosecution in the murder trial of William J. Barnes - the 74-year-old burglar convicted of shooting the then-rookie police officer, Hood said the 41-year period from Barclay's shooting to death was irrelevant. "There was no intervening cause," Hood told the Philadelphia Common Pleas Court jury, referring to the urinary tract infection that killed Barclay Aug. 19, 2007 at age 64. By death Barclay, paralyzed below the waist, had spent 41 years in wheelchairs and nursing home beds, plagued by a life of painful muscle spasms, bedsores and bladder infections.
NEWS
September 22, 2000 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. Howard Pollack, an internationally known expert in radiology and urology and professor emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania, died Wednesday at Abington Memorial Hospital. Dr. Pollack, 72, helped develop the use of imaging techniques such as ultrasound to diagnose and treat diseases of the urinary and reproductive systems and was a pioneer in using lithotripsy, or shock waves, to crush kidney stones. A longtime resident of Cheltenham who lived more recently in Jenkintown, Dr. Pollack edited the textbook that is considered the bible of the field of uroradiology, and doctors from across the world called on him for advice.
NEWS
November 20, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Recurrent urinary tract infections that plague many women may be caused by a single infection that's never cured, even by antibiotics, say researchers using new imaging techniques to study how bacteria attack the bladder. "We discovered that cells that line the bladder have a built-in defense mechanism that kicks in when bacteria attach to them - they commit suicide and slough off," said Scott Hultgen, a microbiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, head of the research team.
NEWS
May 4, 1997 | By Rick Santorum
On Sept. 26, 1996, the U.S. Senate voted to sustain President Clinton's veto of the Partial Birth Abortion Ban. I led the fight to override the veto on the Senate floor. Central to the debate was the assertion by opponents of the ban that this procedure was necessary later in pregnancy when a severe fetal defect was discovered. Opponents told me I could not understand what women who experienced the procedure had gone though. "It has never touched your life," one senator said. This is the story of how - just one week after that vote - it did. We had been through the sonogram routine before - the technician would turn out the lights, spread gel on my wife Karen's growing abdomen, and right there on the screen we would get the first glimpse of our baby.
LIVING
January 31, 1994 | By Ron Gasbarro, FOR THE INQUIRER
The antibiotics your doctor prescribes for you used to be relatively inexpensive. But with the introduction of some newer compounds, don't be surprised if you are spending anywhere from $50 to $100 to get your prescription filled. "Sometimes the cost of an antibiotic takes a customer's breath away," says Gary Renhardt, pharmacy director of Little Rock, Ark.-based Harvest Foods. "I have to admit, I've handed back more than a few prescriptions to customers who said they were going right home to call their doctor.
NEWS
June 9, 1992 | By Marc Schogol, with reports from Inquirer wire services
A SEA CHANGE Looking to get away from it all? Residents of Isle Au Haut, a small island seven miles off the Maine coast, are looking for a few good homesteaders. Only good neighbors who do not need a job and do not mind an isolated lifestyle need apply. To counter an annual summer invasion that has strained the island's resources and inflated real estate prices, Isle Au Haut is offering cheap land with priceless ocean views and as much privacy as a body can stand. NIGHT SHIFT BLUES Working irregular hours can be hazardous to your health.
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