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NEWS
June 12, 1989 | By MARK RANDALL
Signs of social collapse surround us, but for sheer graphic economy, it's hard to beat the now standard Rittenhouse stoop decoration: a classical urn of dainty flowers chained with a vengeance to the railing. A poet would die for an image like this, striking and pathetic and loaded with enough symbols to choke a sophomore. Beauty, art and nature hold forth in the urn of flowers; ugliness and barbarism counter in the chain. And together they create a nicely modern absurdity: The opposite qualities cancel each other out so that the net addition to beauty is zero.
NEWS
November 27, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
James Wagner's family had prepared a glorious ceremony for his remains. His grandchildren, son, daughter, and other loved ones would gather in Forest Hill Cemetery in Ann Arbor, Mich., and place his ashes in a monument wall in September 2015. The remains of his widow, who is in deteriorating health, eventually would be placed next to his. The family would then attend a football game at the University of Michigan, where they said Wagner played as a guard in the 1950s. There's just one problem: The urn containing James Wagner's ashes is missing.
LIVING
March 10, 2000 | By Denise Cowie, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There have been real fish and birds and other wildlife - and occasionally an uninvited spider or two - in the elaborate displays at the Philadelphia Flower Show over the years. But this year, a living person is part of an exhibit. That's rarely been done at the flower show, says Steve Maurer, spokesman for the show's producer, the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. Four times a day, the Queen of Hearts appears in the "Alice in Wonderland" scene created by Philadelphia's William J. Franklin Florist and starts chatting with the audience and scolding her minions - playing cards such as the Knave of Hearts, for instance.
NEWS
October 7, 1999 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Where I grew up, Main Street had gas stations at each end and a moviehouse smack in the middle. The theater sat there like a big magnet. It had the tallest facade and the brightest lights, and drew people toward it. There were big lines for weekend matinees and for "late" shows - as late as 8 p.m. For children, matinees were the main event. You could see two movies for the 50-cent price of one. During the intermission, drawings were held and exotic prizes awarded. I sat impatiently, year after year, clutching my sweaty paper ticket and hoping my numbers would be called.
NEWS
September 16, 1995 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Glass will be featured at several auctions next week, including a book sale. The "glass" at the book sale is a copy of Marc Chagall's The Jerusalem Windows. It will be among more than 500 lots of books that will be offered starting at 10 a.m. Thursday at Freeman/Fine Arts of Philadelphia, Inc., along with two dozen lots of books on ornithology, 20 lots of Civil War books, 75 lots of books about books and 20 lots of postcards. The Chagall book depicting the glass windows he designed is likely to fetch $600 to $900, the top price in the sale, according to the $4 catalogue prepared by David Bloom and Louise Langford.
NEWS
August 16, 2004 | Daily News wire report
Elderly man killed by SEPTA commuter train in Kensington An elderly man was struck and killed Saturday night by a SEPTA commuter train in Kensington. The accident occurred about 9:35 p.m. about two miles past the Holmesburg station on the R-7 line, according to SEPTA spokesman Gary Fairfax. Police dispatchers said the victim was pronounced dead at the scene. Fairfax said the victim was trespassing on the track when he was struck by the train, which carried 157 passengers and was heading into Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 20, 1995 | By Suzanne Sataline, with reports from Inquirer wire services
N.Y. NEIGHBOR A-GAG AT BREW BUBBLING BELOW For one Manhattanite, life over a trendy espresso house has few perks. For four months, Joanne Matuschka has complained to Cooper's Coffee Bar of headaches, nosebleeds and a "feeling of suffocation" when she wakes to the smell seeping up from the beverage brewing below. She has asked the caffeinated company to unplug their pots, shut down the store, and renovate. "Yes, it smells a little bit like coffee in there," said Bart Bonbrest of Cooper's.
NEWS
March 9, 2008 | By Teresa Anicola FOR THE INQUIRER
Tonight's close of the weeklong Philadelphia Flower Show won't signal an end to planning, growing and nurturing for South Jersey exhibitors. The fruits of their labors will carry on long after the last petal is swept up at the Convention Center. Betsy Gagliardi, a member of the Haddonfield Garden Club and cochairwoman of the club's flower show exhibit, will help with projects throughout the year in Haddonfield's historic business district. The club plants and maintains flowers in Kings Court, and urns and hanging baskets on Kings Highway, the heart of the shopping district.
NEWS
July 24, 1994 | By Edward Engel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Nine days after her death, a funeral director placed the urn containing Nicole Leps' cremated ashes on her family's dining room table. Nicole's brother, Charles Jr., flipped on a radio in the family's home. It was the first time the radio had played in the house since Sunday, June 12, when Leps was shot to death by her estranged boyfriend at the Winslow steakhouse where she was a waitress. A pop song flowed from the radio. It was one of Leps' favorites. "All right, Nikki," Mary Beth Leps, Nicole's mother, recalled saying at the time.
NEWS
March 18, 2011 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
Sales next weekend from the estates of two prominent collectors will offer bidders the choice between what might loosely be called plain and fancy. Oddly enough, the plain is likely to draw the higher prices. The fancy will go on the block March 26, when Pook & Pook Inc. will offer the collection of the late J. William Warehime, who had an eye for porcelains, ormolu, tall-case clocks, and sterling. Warehime, of Hanover, Pa., was an executive of the Hanover Foods Corp., which his father founded in 1924, and after retiring in 1987 to form his own investment firm became a board member of Snyder's of Hanover, the famed pretzel maker.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 27, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
James Wagner's family had prepared a glorious ceremony for his remains. His grandchildren, son, daughter, and other loved ones would gather in Forest Hill Cemetery in Ann Arbor, Mich., and place his ashes in a monument wall in September 2015. The remains of his widow, who is in deteriorating health, eventually would be placed next to his. The family would then attend a football game at the University of Michigan, where they said Wagner played as a guard in the 1950s. There's just one problem: The urn containing James Wagner's ashes is missing.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Despite Donald Glover's pedigree as a writer for 30 Rock and his starring role on Community , there's nothing funny about his rap alter ego, Childish Gambino, and albums like Camp . Caustically witty and weirdly metaphorical with an oddly jagged sound track, yes, but hardly the stuff of stand-up or sketch comedy. Then again, during Gambino's Electric Factory show Friday, you couldn't help sensing this was performance art, with its drawing-room set and e-speak projections in accordance with the backstory of his album Because the Internet of a tweet-happy socialite bugging out in his mansion.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
PHILLY NATIVE Walter George Bruhl Jr. is a dead person; he is no more; he is bereft of life; he is deceased; he has rung down the curtain and gone to join the choir invisible; he has expired and gone to meet his maker. Thus wrote Walter George Bruhl Jr., of Newark, Del., and Dewey Beach, Del., in preparing his own obituary. His rich sense of humor is obvious. He wrote: "His spirit was released from his worn-out shell of a body and is now exploring the universe. " Walter Bruhl, a native Philadelphian, longtime DuPont Co. technician and Marine veteran of the Korean War, died March 9. He was 80. His self-composed obituary is full of sharp witticisms.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
The distraught mother of Gloucester County softball star Nicole Ayres arrived at the sentencing of her daughter's killer Wednesday carrying one of the few things that bring her comfort these days: a white marbleized urn filled with Nicole's ashes. "This is so screwed up," Gina Ayres, 45, shouted as sheriff's officers escorted her to an area behind the Mount Holly courtroom to make sure the unexpected vessel and its contents posed no security threat. Awaiting the start of the hearing where Stephen Headley was sentenced to 50 years in prison, she sobbed uncontrollably and remarked bitterly about the justice system as the mother, grandmother, and sister of her daughter's killer sat nearby.
NEWS
March 18, 2011 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
Sales next weekend from the estates of two prominent collectors will offer bidders the choice between what might loosely be called plain and fancy. Oddly enough, the plain is likely to draw the higher prices. The fancy will go on the block March 26, when Pook & Pook Inc. will offer the collection of the late J. William Warehime, who had an eye for porcelains, ormolu, tall-case clocks, and sterling. Warehime, of Hanover, Pa., was an executive of the Hanover Foods Corp., which his father founded in 1924, and after retiring in 1987 to form his own investment firm became a board member of Snyder's of Hanover, the famed pretzel maker.
LIVING
April 16, 2010 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Right up there with the first pitch of the baseball season and the Philadelphia Antiques Show, a sure sign of spring is Kamelot Auction House's annual antique garden and architectural auction. Set to begin at 10 a.m. April 24 in Building M of the complex at 4700 Wissahickon Ave., it will offer more than 750 lots of statuary, urns, fountains, and other garden decor, as well as architectural and industrial elements. In addition to live bidding, it offers absentee and phone-bidding forms at www.kamelotauctions.
NEWS
February 13, 2009 | By Peter Mucha INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Many people are buried with sports memorabilia. Fishing rods. Golf clubs. Shotguns. Even duck decoys. Being buried inside sports memorabilia is another story. But now it's possible. A Phillies funeral casket - the first on view in the region, the distributor says - sits in a showroom at the Kingston & Kemp Funeral Home, just outside Trenton. The exterior is a lustrous white with wood-veneer inlays, and the handles are in Phillies red, sporting red tassels at each end. Logos are strategically placed above the handles, on a fabric liner, and at the casket's ends.
NEWS
March 9, 2008 | By Teresa Anicola FOR THE INQUIRER
Tonight's close of the weeklong Philadelphia Flower Show won't signal an end to planning, growing and nurturing for South Jersey exhibitors. The fruits of their labors will carry on long after the last petal is swept up at the Convention Center. Betsy Gagliardi, a member of the Haddonfield Garden Club and cochairwoman of the club's flower show exhibit, will help with projects throughout the year in Haddonfield's historic business district. The club plants and maintains flowers in Kings Court, and urns and hanging baskets on Kings Highway, the heart of the shopping district.
LIVING
December 17, 2004 | By Denise Cowie INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If Christmas fell in summer, it would be easy to come up with gifts for the gardeners on your list. (More plants!) But the winter equinox is next week, and growing is pretty much restricted to what can be done indoors. Are your favorite gardener's windowsills already brimming with houseplants? Here are a few alternative suggestions. Most of the gifts shown here and inside are in stores as well as online. Don't forget to check out a Web site's delivery schedule, or you could find yourself with nothing to tuck under the tree.
NEWS
August 16, 2004 | Daily News wire report
Elderly man killed by SEPTA commuter train in Kensington An elderly man was struck and killed Saturday night by a SEPTA commuter train in Kensington. The accident occurred about 9:35 p.m. about two miles past the Holmesburg station on the R-7 line, according to SEPTA spokesman Gary Fairfax. Police dispatchers said the victim was pronounced dead at the scene. Fairfax said the victim was trespassing on the track when he was struck by the train, which carried 157 passengers and was heading into Philadelphia.
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