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Ursinus College

NEWS
December 18, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard H. Heist, 82, of Collegeville, a longtime broadcaster who launched a second career restoring antique clocks, died Friday, Nov. 28, of lung disease at his home. He and his wife, Elaine Marshman Heist, had celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary on March 20. Born in Bryn Mawr, Mr. Heist, known as "Dick," graduated from the Perkiomen School and Ursinus College. He studied criminal and civil law while serving as a magistrate for the Borough of Collegeville. He then switched to broadcasting.
NEWS
November 20, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph H. Melrose Jr., 69, a former U.S. ambassador to Sierra Leone, who was dispatched by the State Department to trouble spots after American embassies were bombed, died Saturday, Nov. 8, of complications following a fall. Mr. Melrose died at Lehigh Valley Hospital. He had lived in Washington, Oreland, and Collegeville. As ambassador to Sierra Leone in 2001, he helped bring peace to the nation, which had been involved in a civil war with revolutionary forces. He assisted with the Lomé Peace Accord, and helped uncover the connection between the illicit diamond trade and armed conflict.
NEWS
October 18, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
STARKVILLE, Miss. - The first time his father made the trip for a spring football game, Mississippi State head coach Dan Mullen warned him about the drive, that it would be a rural one from the airport in Jackson up to Starkville. Mullen told him it would be like traveling in the hills of Pennsylvania "past the Main Line. " The 42-year-old coach of the Mississippi State Bulldogs, the improbable top-ranked college football team in the nation - after the fastest rise to the top in the history of the sport, from unranked to No. 1 in six games - is a Drexel Hill native and Ursinus College graduate.
SPORTS
October 17, 2014 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
SO, WHAT'S harder to fathom: that Mississippi State's football team in 5 weeks went from unranked to No. 1 for the first time ever, or that its coach somehow made it to Starkville by way of beautiful, downtown Collegeville, where some two decades ago he was a tight end for Ursinus College? "I've yet to meet anybody in Mississippi who can pronounce [Ursinus] the first time," said Dan Mullen, whose Bulldogs just became the first team in more than 30 years to beat three Top 10 opponents in succession.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the 1970s and 1980s, Samuel W. Madara and his wife, Connie, traveled overseas several times to share ideas about insurance "with a broad group of insurance people," she said. They and others in their group were not simply Americans bringing their methods to other cultures, she said, but were also learning in seminars from foreign insurers. "It was an exchange of ideas peculiar in China" at the time, she said in a phone interview, because in the days before private enterprise, "they were all government workers.
NEWS
September 10, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bobby Fong, 64, the president of Ursinus College and one of the few Asian Americans to hold such a post, died Monday, Sept. 8, at his home in Collegeville. His death, which college officials said was from natural causes, stunned the suburban college community just as the school year was getting underway. His wife of 40 years, Suzanne Dunham Fong, was by his side, according to a statement from the college. Late Monday afternoon, she spoke at an impromptu campus service at which students sang "Amazing Grace.
NEWS
August 5, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Through a work of art, the two women were hoping to save a connection that is slipping away. Their husbands, who have Alzheimer's disease, are becoming more distant, their marriages more solitary and fraught with worry. But in a discussion of a painting called The Immigrants , those husbands - Jack Williams and Dick Force - virtually carried the conversation at the Woodmere Art Museum, in Chestnut Hill. The two men, whose wives had met through their mutual experience as caregivers, found the story in the brushstrokes and shared their thoughts about the discovery.
NEWS
July 30, 2014 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Battling the flames and billowing black smoke, Deborah Feairheller fought her way into the Caln Township home. As a metal air pack pumped oxygen into her mask, she yanked down the ceiling with a long pole to ventilate the attic above. Understandably, she feared for her safety, if not her life. " 'Is the floor going to hold me up?' " Feairheller said she thinks each time she enters a fire. " 'Is the ceiling going to fall on top of me?' " Yet Feairheller knew, better than most, that the top cause of fatalities among firefighters is not collapsing walls, or ceilings, or floors - or smoke inhalation.
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bryn Mawr College, the small private women's school on the Main Line, this week joined a growing number of schools around the country that no longer require the SAT or other standardized test scores for admission. The college instead will rely on high school grades, essays, and other factors - a move officials hope will attract a broader applicant pool. "We know there are students all around the country who, when they see 'test scores,' they see it as a barrier to applying," said Peaches Valdes, Bryn Mawr's director of admissions.
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