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Ursinus College

NEWS
December 20, 2015 | Staff Report
The pedestrian struck and killed on Main Street in Collegeville was a sophomore at Ursinus College, the school says. The college on Friday identified the young woman as Michelle Buck, a Herndon, Va., native who was interested in studying neuroscience and philosophy. The 19-year-old was struck about 6:30 p.m. Thursday at Main Street and Sixth Avenue in front of the Ursinus campus. Buck had been walking east on the sidewalk along Main Street and stepped into the road within a crosswalk when she was hit by a Nissan Rogue that was also traveling east, the Montgomery County District Attorney's Office said.
NEWS
December 19, 2015
A pedestrian was struck and killed by a vehicle Thursday night next to a Montgomery County college, authorities said. The accident was reported at 6:31 p.m. at Main Street and Sixth Avenue next to Ursinus College in Collegeville, a county dispatcher said. The county coroner was called to the scene. No information was immediately available on whether the victim had a connection to the college. The cause of the accident was under investigation. - Robert Moran  
SPORTS
September 18, 2015 | By Adam Hermann, Inquirer Staff Writer
She has spent 38 years at George School, so one might imagine field hockey coach Nancy Zurn Bernardini had experienced just about everything. But this year, this fall, is different for Bernardini, the school's girls' athletic director, who also coaches basketball and varsity lacrosse. After taking seven years off, she has returned to coach the school's varsity field hockey team, reclaiming her post in a sport that has driven her life from the beginning. She picked up field hockey in sixth grade at Abington Friends, the earliest age girls were allowed to officially join the team, but spent countless hours around the team when she was younger as she watched her four sisters play for the Kangaroos.
NEWS
August 10, 2015 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
More and more, it seems, galleries and curators have decided it's worth pulling out the stops in summer, doing the quirky shows they've always wanted to do and damn the torpedoes. Luckily for restive gallery-goers, there are a few of these around this month. Inclined to images of early Philadelphia? The Free Library's Parkway Central Library is brimming with photographs, prints, and paintings of this city, but you might not be aware of its collection of works by Augustus Kollner (1816-1906)
NEWS
July 27, 2015 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
The photographer George Tice has a long-running romance with his home state of New Jersey. It shines through in his large platinum prints of ordinary small-town fixtures: a movie theater, a White Tower hamburger joint, the well-stocked shelves of an old-fashioned grocery. His much-admired nocturnal images of a gas station ( Petit's Mobil Station, Cherry Hill, NJ , 1974) and a lonely telephone booth ( Telephone Booth, 3 A.M. Rahway, NJ , 1974) are of fluorescently lighted places we've all passed and barely noticed while driving at night, but Tice's still versions of them, shot with long exposures, transform them into glowing, mysterious beauties.
NEWS
July 7, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
C. Dallett Hemphill, 56, an American history professor at Ursinus College, an accomplished storyteller, and a scholar whose specialty was social history from colonial times to the 19th century, died at Jefferson Hospital on Friday, July 3, after a prolonged battle with breast cancer. Ms. Hemphill's research topics included how the French government provided women for the settlers of Louisiana and the role of women in 18th-century Quaker meetings. She lived in Erdenheim, Montgomery County.
NEWS
July 7, 2015
C. DALLETT HEMPHILL, a professor of American history at Ursinus College for the last 28 years and a leading scholar on Philadelphia, died Friday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital-Center City after a prolonged battle with cancer. She was 56 and lived in Erdenheim, Montgomery County. Hemphill's academic specialty was the social history of the United States, from the Colonial era into the 19th century. She wrote two books, both published by Oxford University Press: Bowing to Necessities: A History of Manners in America, 1620-1860 , and Siblings: Brothers and Sisters in American History . Hemphill shared the preoccupations of her generation of historians with social history and women's history.
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ursinus College on Thursday named the dean of economics and finance at Claremont McKenna College in California as its next president. S. Brock Blomberg, 48, a political economist who studies terrorism, replaces Lucien "Terry" Winegar, who had been serving as interim president since Bobby Fong's death in September. Blomberg takes over July 1 as the 17th president of Ursinus, a 1,600-student liberal arts college in Collegeville. "Our objective was to discover someone who could embrace the Ursinus DNA, our values and what we are about, who is passionate about the liberal arts, and comes with highly regarded leadership experience," Michael Marcon, a college trustee and search committee chair, said in a statement.
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
During summers in the 1960s, William J. Jordan took a break from teaching American history to South Jersey high school students and taught Revolutionary history to tourists in Philadelphia. The National Park Service gave him its uniform, its distinctive flat-brimmed hat, anointed him a seasonal park ranger, and assigned him to tours of Independence National Historical Park. "I know he loved that time in history," daughter Karen Jordan said. "He gave us all copies of the Constitution, his children," she said.
NEWS
March 28, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Gray Warden III, 82, of Newtown Square, a business executive and sailor, died Wednesday, March 18, of causes related to aging at his second home in the Bahamas. A native of Haverford, Delaware County, Mr. Warden graduated from the Haverford School in 1950. While there, he played soccer and ran track. Four years later, Mr. Warden graduated from Williams College in Massachusetts and received a commission as a second lieutenant in the Air Force. He became a pilot and flew early-generation single-engine jets.
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