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Ursinus College

NEWS
February 13, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
By lunchtime Thursday, Ursinus College freshman Sam Hayslett was happy to be healthy. She took a Spanish test in the morning, and had no complaints about having to bundle up and trudge off to the athletic center for a hoagie. But Hayslett acknowledged her luck may not last. Her roommate had started vomiting overnight - the first sign of what everyone was calling the Ursinus plague. In barely 48 hours, a stomach virus had washed over the Collegeville campus, disrupting life at the liberal arts school unlike anything in recent memory.
NEWS
February 12, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Twenty-two Ursinus College students have required hospital treatment and scores more have been sickened by an unidentified stomach infection that has sent school officials scrambling to close dining halls and investigate the cause. "Ursinus is actively investigating the potential cause of this illness to determine whether it is food-borne or transmitted by person-to-person contact," the college said in a statement Wednesday. The Collegeville school is working with the Montgomery County Health Department to investigate the cause of the illness.
NEWS
January 23, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ursinus College has appointed Montgomery County restaurateur and caterer Maureen Cumpstone as entrepreneur-in-residence, a new position that will involve teaching the school's first entrepreneurship course and supporting the U-Imagine Center for Integrative and Entrepreneurial Studies. The U-Imagine Center was established in December 2013 to establish and sustain an entrepreneurial spirit on the Collegeville campus, a growing emphasis at many schools. Cumpstone, a 1979 graduate of Ursinus, launched Sorella Rose Bar & Grille, a Flourtown restaurant and catering business, in 1995, eventually expanding to include event planning and a second location, in Avalon, N.J. dmastrull@phillynews.com 215-854-2466 @dmastrull  
NEWS
December 20, 2015 | Staff Report
The pedestrian struck and killed on Main Street in Collegeville was a sophomore at Ursinus College, the school says. The college on Friday identified the young woman as Michelle Buck, a Herndon, Va., native who was interested in studying neuroscience and philosophy. The 19-year-old was struck about 6:30 p.m. Thursday at Main Street and Sixth Avenue in front of the Ursinus campus. Buck had been walking east on the sidewalk along Main Street and stepped into the road within a crosswalk when she was hit by a Nissan Rogue that was also traveling east, the Montgomery County District Attorney's Office said.
NEWS
December 19, 2015
A pedestrian was struck and killed by a vehicle Thursday night next to a Montgomery County college, authorities said. The accident was reported at 6:31 p.m. at Main Street and Sixth Avenue next to Ursinus College in Collegeville, a county dispatcher said. The county coroner was called to the scene. No information was immediately available on whether the victim had a connection to the college. The cause of the accident was under investigation. - Robert Moran  
SPORTS
September 18, 2015 | By Adam Hermann, Inquirer Staff Writer
She has spent 38 years at George School, so one might imagine field hockey coach Nancy Zurn Bernardini had experienced just about everything. But this year, this fall, is different for Bernardini, the school's girls' athletic director, who also coaches basketball and varsity lacrosse. After taking seven years off, she has returned to coach the school's varsity field hockey team, reclaiming her post in a sport that has driven her life from the beginning. She picked up field hockey in sixth grade at Abington Friends, the earliest age girls were allowed to officially join the team, but spent countless hours around the team when she was younger as she watched her four sisters play for the Kangaroos.
NEWS
August 10, 2015 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
More and more, it seems, galleries and curators have decided it's worth pulling out the stops in summer, doing the quirky shows they've always wanted to do and damn the torpedoes. Luckily for restive gallery-goers, there are a few of these around this month. Inclined to images of early Philadelphia? The Free Library's Parkway Central Library is brimming with photographs, prints, and paintings of this city, but you might not be aware of its collection of works by Augustus Kollner (1816-1906)
NEWS
July 27, 2015 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
The photographer George Tice has a long-running romance with his home state of New Jersey. It shines through in his large platinum prints of ordinary small-town fixtures: a movie theater, a White Tower hamburger joint, the well-stocked shelves of an old-fashioned grocery. His much-admired nocturnal images of a gas station ( Petit's Mobil Station, Cherry Hill, NJ , 1974) and a lonely telephone booth ( Telephone Booth, 3 A.M. Rahway, NJ , 1974) are of fluorescently lighted places we've all passed and barely noticed while driving at night, but Tice's still versions of them, shot with long exposures, transform them into glowing, mysterious beauties.
NEWS
July 7, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
C. Dallett Hemphill, 56, an American history professor at Ursinus College, an accomplished storyteller, and a scholar whose specialty was social history from colonial times to the 19th century, died at Jefferson Hospital on Friday, July 3, after a prolonged battle with breast cancer. Ms. Hemphill's research topics included how the French government provided women for the settlers of Louisiana and the role of women in 18th-century Quaker meetings. She lived in Erdenheim, Montgomery County.
NEWS
July 7, 2015
C. DALLETT HEMPHILL, a professor of American history at Ursinus College for the last 28 years and a leading scholar on Philadelphia, died Friday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital-Center City after a prolonged battle with cancer. She was 56 and lived in Erdenheim, Montgomery County. Hemphill's academic specialty was the social history of the United States, from the Colonial era into the 19th century. She wrote two books, both published by Oxford University Press: Bowing to Necessities: A History of Manners in America, 1620-1860 , and Siblings: Brothers and Sisters in American History . Hemphill shared the preoccupations of her generation of historians with social history and women's history.
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