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November 17, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
USA Track & Field accused international officials of making unfounded allegations about its drug-testing practices as part of a "political agenda" against the American body. USATF issued a three-page statement yesterday in response to recent "finger-pointing" by Arne Ljungqvist, the anti-doping chief of the International Amateur Athletic Federation, and Dick Pound, head of the World Anti-Doping Agency. At a WADA meeting Tuesday in Oslo, Norway, Ljungqvist reiterated his charge that USATF is withholding details of 10 positive cases, including two in which athletes were exonerated after testing positive for the steroid nandrolone.
SPORTS
June 12, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
The latest saga in the Mary Slaney mystery took another weird turn yesterday, when USA Track & Field suspended her from the national championships but couldn't tell her lawyer why. The USA championships began yesterday in Indianapolis. Slaney allegedly had a positive drug test at last year's U.S. Olympic Trials. Slaney's lawyer, Jim Coleman, said he had received a letter from USATF saying it was incorrect that she had tested positive for high levels of testosterone. Coleman said he then asked USATF what the problem was, but didn't get a satisfactory answer.
SPORTS
June 9, 1997 | By Ron Reid, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
USA Track and Field, reeling under a succession of blows to its public image along with diminished sponsor and fan interest, is expected to name Craig Masback as its new executive director here tomorrow. It remains to be seen whether Masback will be the right man for what amounts to a formidable rescue mission, but there is no denying he knows the sport and is highly aware of the federation's problems. A Washington lawyer and former world-class miler from Princeton, Masback has worked as a television analyst at several competitions, including the world championships and the Olympic Games.
SPORTS
July 3, 2012 | By Pat Graham, Associated Press
EUGENE, Ore. - It will be remembered as the most anticipated race never run: the runoff that turned into a walk away to conclude the U.S. track trials. Jeneba Tarmoh conceded the final Olympic spot in the 100 meters rather than meet training partner Allyson Felix at the starting line on Monday to break a third-place tie. She notified USA Track and Field early in the day of her intention to withdraw from the evening race, not specifying why she was stepping aside. In an e-mail sent through her agent to USATF, Tarmoh said: "I understand that with this decision I am no longer running the 100m dash in the Olympic Games and will be an alternate for the event.
SPORTS
September 19, 1997 | By Ron Reid, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary Slaney, 39, may have been cleared of doping charges this week by the U.S. track and field federation, but it remains to be seen if America's greatest female distance runner will be allowed to compete anywhere during the next two years. Slaney's fate remains in the hands of the International Amateur Athletics Federation, the world governing body for track and field, whose doping commission probably will review the U.S. findings in late November. "If the IAAF doping commission believes the decision of the USATF is correct, there is no further action to take," said Giorgio Reineri, a spokesman for the Monaco-based federation.
SPORTS
February 23, 2001 | By Ron Reid, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
USA Track and Field (USATF) formally announced yesterday what had hardly been a secret: In 2004, the U.S. Olympic track and field trials again will be held in Sacramento, Calif. It marked the first time in more than 20 years that a city had been selected twice in succession for the event. Eugene, Ore., was the host city for the trials in 1972, 1976 and 1980. Sacramento, the California capital, staged the trials last summer, and the eight-day meet at Hornet Stadium drew a total of 187,104 spectators.
SPORTS
December 3, 2012 | By Jen A. Miller, For the Inquirer
Hugh Campbell started running for the same reason many of us do. "I just got a bug in my sod about trying to run," he said. He mapped a 0.75-mile route near his house in Wilmington, ran it, and then ran it again. And again. He kept adding distance until he worked up to three miles, after which he ran a 3k. One big difference, though: Campbell was 87 when he got that bug in his sod. Now, he's considered a world-class runner for his age group. At 88, Campbell has set U.S. records in the 5k and 8k distances for male runners ages 80 and up. Two weeks ago, he broke the USA Track and Field 8k record for his age group at the Rothman Institute 8k in Philadelphia with a time of 47 minutes, 40 seconds, as part of the Philadelphia marathon racing weekend.
SPORTS
September 29, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Under fire for allegedly suppressing positive drug tests, USA Track & Field proposed that its entire doping-control program be handed over to an independent world body. Craig Masback, executive director of USATF, suggested today that the World Anti-Doping Agency handle all in-competition and out-of-competition tests for American athletes and investigate any positive cases. USATF also announced it was forming a special commission to review its drug-testing procedures and address allegations that a number of positive cases have been covered up. Arne Ljungqvist, the anti-doping chief of the International Amateur Athletic Federation, said last week that USATF had withheld information on 12 to 15 positive tests in the past two years.
SPORTS
July 28, 1998 | By Ron Reid, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This article includes information from the Associated Press
Dennis Mitchell, the world-class sprinter whose career began at Edgewood Regional High School in Atco, N.J., and Randy Barnes, the world record-holder in the shot put, have been suspended indefinitely for testing positive for banned performance-enhancing drugs. Both were cited yesterday by the International Amateur Athletics Federation, the world governing body of track and field, for failing out-of-competition drug testing on April 1. The Monaco-based IAAF made its findings known to USA Track and Field last week, forcing Mitchell to withdraw from Saturday's U.S. Open meet in Edwardsville, Ill. Craig Masback, executive president of USATF, reacted with outrage at the decision.
SPORTS
February 10, 2009 | Daily News Wire Services
A task force commissioned by USA Track and Field lashed out at the American relay system, recommending streamlining Olympic trials and calling for a more stringent policy for dopers who want to be reinstated. The report came in the wake of a disappointing showing at the Beijing Olympics. Americans led all countries with 23 track and field medals but their seven golds were the lowest total since the 1997 world championships. The task force is called "Project 30," a nod to the goal of winning 30 medals at the 2012 London Olympics.
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SPORTS
December 3, 2012 | By Jen A. Miller, For the Inquirer
Hugh Campbell started running for the same reason many of us do. "I just got a bug in my sod about trying to run," he said. He mapped a 0.75-mile route near his house in Wilmington, ran it, and then ran it again. And again. He kept adding distance until he worked up to three miles, after which he ran a 3k. One big difference, though: Campbell was 87 when he got that bug in his sod. Now, he's considered a world-class runner for his age group. At 88, Campbell has set U.S. records in the 5k and 8k distances for male runners ages 80 and up. Two weeks ago, he broke the USA Track and Field 8k record for his age group at the Rothman Institute 8k in Philadelphia with a time of 47 minutes, 40 seconds, as part of the Philadelphia marathon racing weekend.
SPORTS
July 3, 2012 | By Pat Graham, Associated Press
EUGENE, Ore. - It will be remembered as the most anticipated race never run: the runoff that turned into a walk away to conclude the U.S. track trials. Jeneba Tarmoh conceded the final Olympic spot in the 100 meters rather than meet training partner Allyson Felix at the starting line on Monday to break a third-place tie. She notified USA Track and Field early in the day of her intention to withdraw from the evening race, not specifying why she was stepping aside. In an e-mail sent through her agent to USATF, Tarmoh said: "I understand that with this decision I am no longer running the 100m dash in the Olympic Games and will be an alternate for the event.
SPORTS
July 2, 2012 | By Pat Graham, Associated Press
EUGENE, Ore. - The tie for third place in the women's 100 meters at the U.S. track and field finals will be decided by a runoff Monday. Allyson Felix and Jeneba Tarmoh will race to determine the third member of the Olympic team for London, officials confirmed Sunday. Felix and Tarmoh finished in a dead heat for third in the 100 more than a week ago. Track officials had no policy in place to resolve it but devised a tiebreaker that included the options of a runoff or a coin flip. The runoff will be held at 5 p.m. local time - 8 p.m. EDT - at Hayward Field.
SPORTS
June 28, 2012 | The Inquirer Staff
The fastest female sprinters fly down the track in around 11 seconds in the 100 meters. Only in this case, a calendar, not a stopwatch, is needed since it's now taken three days and counting for USA Track and Field to sort out just who should fill the last American spot for the women's 100 at the London Games. Even high-tech cameras couldn't break a third-place tie between Allyson Felix and Jeneba Tarmoh in the final in Eugene, Ore., on Saturday. Tarmoh was originally declared the third-place finisher in the race and official scoring said she had edged training partner Felix by 0.0001 seconds.
SPORTS
February 10, 2009 | Daily News Wire Services
A task force commissioned by USA Track and Field lashed out at the American relay system, recommending streamlining Olympic trials and calling for a more stringent policy for dopers who want to be reinstated. The report came in the wake of a disappointing showing at the Beijing Olympics. Americans led all countries with 23 track and field medals but their seven golds were the lowest total since the 1997 world championships. The task force is called "Project 30," a nod to the goal of winning 30 medals at the 2012 London Olympics.
SPORTS
September 12, 2008 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Michael Phelps will step out of his chlorinated comfort zone to host the season premiere of Saturday Night Live tomorrow night, treading the same stage where his comedy idol, Chris Farley, once got big laughs. The swimmer who won a record-setting eight gold medals in last month's Olympics has been riding a pop culture wave since Beijing, making the rounds of the TV talk shows, presenting an award at MTV's Video Music Awards, and being gossiped about in the tabloids. Phelps follows in the athletic footsteps of LeBron James, Peyton Manning, Derek Jeter and Michael Jordan, who also hosted NBC's late-night sketch show.
SPORTS
December 6, 2007 | By Elliott Denman FOR THE INQUIRER
For years to come, when Richard Stockton College track and field, lacrosse and soccer athletes strut their stuff before their home fans, they will do it at at G. Larry James Stadium. And they will have a giant touchstone to skim for good luck before heading onto the playing field. The athletic field was formally named for the Olympic track and field great, who has served Stockton in a myriad of capacities - track coach, director of athletics, now dean of athletics and recreational programs - since 1972.
SPORTS
November 16, 2007 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you're one of the 16,000 runners in Sunday's Philadelphia Marathon, leave your iPod at home. A ban on iPods, MP3 players and other electronic devices that require headphones will be at least the official policy of the marathon, now in its 14th year, and of USA Track and Field (USATF), the national governing body of running, which sanctions the race. But the reality is, everybody, including the race organizers, knows full well that plenty of runners, perhaps thousands, will likely willfully and knowingly defy official policy - you know, hoof it to Hootie and the Blowfish or whatever personal mix of tunes gives them the inspiration and energy to make it to the finish line.
SPORTS
January 30, 2004 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The United States Olympic Committee has told USA Track & Field that its governing-body status will be taken away if it fails to resolve the Jerome Young doping case. In a letter yesterday to USATF president Bill Roe, the USOC's acting president, Bill Martin, accused the national governing body of refusing to hand over documents relating to Young's failed drug test in 1999. After Young won the 400-meter gold medal in the Paris world championships in August, a U.S. newspaper said he had tested positive in 1999 for performance-enhancing drugs but had been cleared on appeal by USATF.
SPORTS
January 28, 2004 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The long-running dispute over U.S. sprinter Jerome Young's drug case could be headed for the sports world's highest court. Track and field's world governing body is preparing to mount a legal challenge against the decision by U.S. officials to clear Young after a positive steroid test in 1999, the Associated Press said yesterday. The case, which has strained U.S. relations with international sports bodies, could lead to the loss of gold medals for Young and his relay teammates in the 2000 Olympics.
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