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FOOD
October 4, 1987 | The Inquirer staff
Chik Chek, a $5 kit for testing raw poultry and other meats for the presence of harmful bacteria, was labeled "neither accurate nor useful" by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's food safety and inspection service. The agency recently conducted an extensive laboratory review of the product, manufactured by Diversified Diagnostic Industries of Moraga, Calif., and concluded that the test did "not perform reliably. " The findings, in the form of an advisory, were issued to caution consumers who may depend on Chik Chek's results during food preparation.
NEWS
June 12, 2014 | BY BRUCE FRIEDRICH
A YEAR AGO, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Office of the Inspector General (OIG) issued a scathing report, accusing the food-safety division of the agency of not fulfilling, or even understanding, its legal obligations where humane slaughter enforcement is concerned. Specifically, the OIG found that the USDA does not meaningfully attempt to stop repeat violations of the Humane Slaughter Act and that many USDA inspectors do not even understand what is required of them. Even when OIG inspectors monitored their actions openly, inspectors still did not understand or carry out their slaughter-oversight mandate.
NEWS
October 1, 1986 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
An internal study ordered by Agriculture Secretary Richard E. Lyng shows that the number of discrimination complaints against the USDA was "relatively low," and a special advisory council will be created to guide the department's civil rights policy. "What surprised me more than anything is that we did not have as many widespread complaints as we thought," Samuel Cornelius, director of the Office of Advocacy and Enterprise for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, said yesterday.
NEWS
May 7, 1987 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer (Contributing to this report were United Press International, Reuters, the Washington Post, USA Today and the New York Times.)
Despite protests from some employees, a prayer ceremony starring Pat Boone is expected to proceed as scheduled this morning at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) in Washington. The observance, in response to a proclamation signed by President Reagan declaring today a National Day of Prayer, is billed as private and voluntary but reached semiofficial status last month when departmental stationery was used to invite workers. "We've all kicked in to defray the cost of the program and give Pat Boone a set of USDA cuff links," said department official Nicholas Longfellow.
NEWS
June 4, 1986 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A high-ranking black administrator at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, who has accused the agency of racial discrimination and of violating civil rights laws, yesterday responded to USDA charges that she had misused government personnel and property. Edith P. Thomas was notified by letter on May 19 that the department intended to dismiss her from her job as head of the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program. That job, part of the department's Extension Service, involves giving dietary information to low-income families.
NEWS
September 28, 2010
Unisys Corp., Blue Bell, today said it won a contract worth up to $18 million to provide security software and support for the 29 agencies of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The project will result in a virtual Agriculture Security Operations Center for real-time monitoring and response to security incidents, Unisys said. The first year of the contract is for $8 million, the company said, and four one-year options are worth about $2.5 million each. Unisys has revenue of about $4.5 billion yearly.
NEWS
June 10, 2010 | By Steve Karnowski, ASSOCIATED PRESS
MINNEAPOLIS - The U.S. Department of Agriculture has released the final draft of a new crop insurance plan it says will save the federal government an estimated $6 billion over 10 years. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack told reporters during a conference call from Washington on Thursday that $4 billion of the savings will go toward deficit reduction. He says $2 billion will be used to expand farm risk management programs and the Conservation Reserve Program, which pays landowners to take environmentally sensitive land out of production.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1987 | By KEVIN HANEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia importers have fought to a draw against competing California interests in the Great Grape War's latest skirmish. But local shipping interests who have battled efforts to impose restrictions on the lucrative winter fruit importing business with Chile remain intent on all-out victory. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, in a regulation to be published tomorrow, will impose import duties and quality standards on grapes starting April 20. That's 10 days earlier than the normal May 1 deadline for unrestricted import of foreign grapes, a move that the Chilean Exporters Association estimates could cause growers, shippers and consumers up to $50 million this year.
NEWS
May 18, 2003 | By Oliver Prichard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From key policymakers to midlevel administrators, the Department of Agriculture is staffed with former executives of the meat and poultry industry, now in charge of regulating their former employers. The USDA has long had connections to America's big meat packers, and critics say the agency is too cozy with the industry. Regulators with industry backgrounds are unlikely to fight for much-needed enhancements to the USDA's enforcement powers - which meat companies have successfully kept off the congressional agenda for years, said Dan Glickman, who was secretary of agriculture from 1995 to 2001.
NEWS
November 29, 1998 | By Melody McDonald, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The police substation on South Dennis Drive stays - at least for now. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, which owns the three-bedroom, one-story house in Delsea Estates used as a police substation, agreed last week to extend the township's lease for one year in return for tax relief. The USDA has been leasing the house to the township for $1 a year since 1995. Soon, however, the property will be sold, said George Hyatt Jr., director of USDA's rural housing programs. "It has to end in the near future," Hyatt said.
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NEWS
January 22, 2016 | By Jessica Parks, Staff Writer
Federal regulators have launched an investigation into a Montgomery County farm accused by animal rights activists of mistreating animals it breeds for pet stores. Tanya Espinosa, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, said the agency began investigating Holmes Chinchilla Ranch of Douglass Township last month for possible violations of animal welfare laws. Holmes, which breeds hamsters and other small animals, came under scrutiny after People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals released videos and testimony alleging improper treatment and deaths at the farm.
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bent on making fresh fruits and vegetables available to more Americans, the U.S. Department of Agriculture sent one of its top officials Thursday to the Clark Park Farmers Market to tout its efforts at doing just that. "We're trying to nudge low-income households to eat more nutritious foods," U.S. Department of Agriculture Under Secretary Kevin Concannon said in an interview before talking to the merchants and shoppers about ways to get more healthy foods in their diets. Americans on food stamps spent a record $18.8 million at farmers markets and local farm stands last year, a roughly sixfold increase since 2008, according to Concannon.
FOOD
June 26, 2015 | By Danya Henninger, For The Inquirer
Just two years after hawking his first slabs of home-cured bacon at the Lansdowne Farmers Market, Ari Miller is preparing to take his artisanal charcuterie nationwide. 1732 Meats, his new, 4,000- square-foot plant in Yeadon, recently received USDA certification and began production. Miller is hoping for the same reception around the country that he's gotten from local chefs for his high-quality, sustainably raised salumi. "The quality of Ari's product is unmatched as far as domestic salumi is concerned," said Joe Cicala, chef and partner at East Passyunk's Le Virtu and Brigantessa.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
High rates of hunger persisted in the United States in 2013, with 49 million Americans - 16 million of them children - unable to consistently eat nutritious food. In 360,000 U.S. households, conditions were so severe that children skipped meals, or didn't eat for a whole day because there wasn't enough money for food. Overall, levels of hunger remained essentially unchanged between 2012 and 2013, although hunger declined slightly between 2011 and 2013. The findings are from a federal annual report released Wednesday by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, "Household Food Security in the United States in 2013," the official measure of hunger in America.
NEWS
June 12, 2014 | BY BRUCE FRIEDRICH
A YEAR AGO, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Office of the Inspector General (OIG) issued a scathing report, accusing the food-safety division of the agency of not fulfilling, or even understanding, its legal obligations where humane slaughter enforcement is concerned. Specifically, the OIG found that the USDA does not meaningfully attempt to stop repeat violations of the Humane Slaughter Act and that many USDA inspectors do not even understand what is required of them. Even when OIG inspectors monitored their actions openly, inspectors still did not understand or carry out their slaughter-oversight mandate.
NEWS
November 15, 2013
DEPENDING HOW you count it, Meatless Monday, endorsed by City Council this fall, is a movement that's been around for a decade - or a century. In 2003, the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Center for a Livable Future put its official stamp on Meatless Mondays - simply eating meat-free on that day to avoid the known health liabilities of meat and get more mouth-time for fruits and veggies. But there were also "Meatless Mondays" back in World War I, launched by the United States Food Administration to conserve resources.
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | Vance Lehmkuhl, Philly.com
CHEERS TO Ganesh Selvakumar of Broomall! His vegan recipe for Lentil-Spinach Soup and Mint Chutney earned him a trip to the White House this week as the Pennsylvania winner of the 2013 Healthy Lunchtime Challenge. You may remember Michelle Obama's all-organic White House kitchen garden two months into President Obama's first term. After a shot across the bow from disgruntled pesticide advocates, the first lady toned down the organic talk and put an emphasis instead on exercise with her 2010 launch, "Let's Move!"
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Mary Clare Jalonick and Connie Cass, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Kids, your days of blowing off those healthier school lunches and filling up on cookies from the vending machine are numbered. The government is on to you. For the first time, the Agriculture Department is telling schools what sorts of snacks they can sell. The new restrictions announced Thursday fill a gap in nutrition rules that allowed many students to load up on fat, sugar, and salt despite the guidelines for healthy meals. "Parents will no longer have to worry that their kids are using their lunch money to buy junk food and junk drinks at school," said Margo Wootan, a nutrition lobbyist for the Center for Science in the Public Interest who pushed for the new rules.
NEWS
June 27, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Already under scrutiny for taking too long to process unemployment checks and home-energy assistance claims, Pennsylvania is also too slow in approving food-stamp applications, compelling the federal government to order the state to improve its performance. Pennsylvania ranks among the worst in the nation for getting food stamps to the needy within 30 days, as required by federal law, according to an Inquirer examination of data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which runs the food-stamp program.
NEWS
February 25, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
C. Roland Eddy, 98, a research chemist for the U.S. Department of Agriculture for 31 years who also taught college courses, died Tuesday, Feb. 12, at Meadowood, a continuing care community in Worcester. Mr. Eddy discovered several compounds and developed and managed the Agriculture Department's first computer center in the 1960s. He worked at the Agriculture Department from 1941 to 1972. During the 1940s, '50s, and '60s, he was a part-time instructor at Temple University, teaching courses including thermodynamics and electrochemistry.
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