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SPORTS
January 28, 2001 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If there was any hope for compromise in the increasingly contentious battle between the U.S. Golf Association and Callaway Golf on the issue of the banned ERC II driver, it probably ended last week. Both sides - golf's governing body in the United States and the equipment giant - reiterated that they were doing what was best for golf and for golfers, and both made it clear that they would not budge. "We told them, if they drew the line in the sand, we were going to continue to make clubs that exceed them," a defiant Ely Callaway, founder and chairman of Callaway Golf, told the golf media at a company demonstration of the company's newest lines, including the nonconforming ERC II driver, at the annual PGA Merchandise Show.
SPORTS
May 22, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stu Ingraham has utilized an anchored stroke with a long putter for the last 23 years, a span during which he has won Philadelphia Section PGA player of the year honors on eight occasions including last year. So Ingraham strongly disagreed Tuesday with the joint decision by the U.S. Golf Association and the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews to ban an anchored putting stroke, either with a long putter or a belly putter, saying the stroke goes against the traditional golf swing where a club is gripped with both hands away from the body.
SPORTS
June 26, 2013 | DAILY NEWS STAFF REPORT
STONEWALL LINKS, in Elverson, Chester County, will host the 2016 Mid-Amateur Championship, the USGA announced yesterday. It will be the first USGA championship held at Stonewall Links. The dates are Sept. 10-15. Stonewall Links is located 50 miles northwest of Philadelphia, and will host the event on its Tom Doak-designed Old and North Courses. The Old Course's design challenges players from tee to green and emphasizes accuracy and distance, while the North Course features more difficult green complexes and requires a more exacting short game.
SPORTS
January 14, 2001 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In laymen's terms, the dispute between Callaway Golf and the U.S. Golf Association is about how fast and how far a golf ball bounces off the face of the new ERC II driver. The clash began to take shape three years ago, when the USGA, the governing body for golf in this country, decided that manufacturers were developing clubs that could hit a golf ball too far. The USGA feared that eventually, as clubs were developed that could hit the ball even farther, golf courses and, indeed, the integrity of the game could be jeopardized.
SPORTS
September 17, 1986 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Merion Golf Club, the host for four U.S. Open championships, will welcome back the U.S. Golf Association twice in the next six years, when it hosts the 1989 U.S. Amateur and the 1992 U.S. Women's Open. Meade Geisel, the president at Merion, said yesterday that a contract had been signed with the USGA for both tournaments. The USGA plans a formal announcement today from its headquarters in Far Hills, N.J. Merion last hosted a U.S. Amateur in 1966; the 1989 Amateur will be its fifth.
SPORTS
June 18, 1998 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
Since 1984, the rules of golf have stated that "the material and construction of a club face shall not have the effect at impact of a spring. " Now, the U.S. Golf Association has proposed a test protocol to measure that effect. A lot of folks believe equipment advances are allowing players to hit the ball too far, and thereby threaten the integrity of the game. The USGA, which governs the game in this country, maintains that it is merely addressing those concerns. "The current language requires clarification," executive director David Fay said yesterday at the Olympic Club, site of the U.S. Open, which begins today.
SPORTS
September 14, 1997 | By Pamela F. Emory, FOR THE INQUIRER
Judy Bell, president of the United States Golf Association, worked over Labor Day. That wasn't all that unusual for an administrator of a major organization. What she was doing, however, had nothing to do with the royal and ancient game. "We were short of people at the deli," she said, referring to Bell's Deli, one of six businesses she owns or co-owns in Colorado Springs, Colo. "They called and asked me to come in and help with lunch. I took orders and made sandwiches. Then I had to stay and help set up for dinner.
SPORTS
April 6, 1990 | By Kevin Mulligan, Daily News Sports Writer
On the first day of the Masters, there was controversy. The United States Golf Association has banned the golf shoes worn in the past by John Huston. Huston, after shooting a 6-under-par 66, good for second place heading into today's second round, revealed that the USGA ruled illegal the Weight-Rite shoes he normally wears and endorses. This week, he is wearing a pair of flat Footjoys, which he purchased for $160. According to Huston, the USGA feels the Weight-Rites give him an unfair balance advantage; they feature a built-up outer edge of the soles.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Joe Juliano and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
The threat of severe weather for Thursday's opening round of the U.S. Open has U.S. Golf Association officials and the grounds staff at Merion Golf Club braced and prepared for anything on either side of the spectator ropes. Heavy rain and thunderstorms that could be severe, and strong wind and hail could make it a challenge for the USGA to get all 156 players around Merion's East Course, a layout that has been battered by 61/2 inches of rain since Friday. Already the weather has forced one change.
SPORTS
February 9, 2003 | By Joe Logan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At its annual meeting in San Diego last week, the U.S. Golf Association named Reed Mackenzie to a second and final year as president. Mackenzie, 60, a successful trial lawyer from suburban Minneapolis, became a USGA committeeman in 1977 and joined the Executive Committee in '92. He has worked as a rules official at every U.S. Open since 1978. In addition to being a four-time club champion at Hazeltine National Golf Club, site of last year's PGA Championship, Mackenzie is a passionate jazz fan and an accomplished saxophonist.
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SPORTS
June 18, 2015 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
UNIVERSITY PLACE, Wash. - The artist had heard enough from the critics. Robert Trent Jones Jr. designed Chambers Bay to host a U.S. Open. Only 8 years old, the Bay undulates wildly from tee to green like St. Andrews and has waste areas like Pine Valley. It incorporates 1,000 feet of vertical climbs over a 7-mile trudge and can use vastly different tee boxes, depending on the USGA's whim and the prevailing winds. It is a taxing test, amplified by players' unfamiliarity with it . . . and their criticisms of it. That's why Robert Trent Jones Jr. snuck into Tiger Woods' news conference yesterday.
SPORTS
February 20, 2015 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
THE PGA TOUR will be back in the Philadelphia area in 2018, following a 7-year absence. The Daily News has confirmed a Comcast SportsNet report that Newtown Square's Aronimink Country Club will host the BMW Championship in mid-September of that year. That event, the third leg of the FedExCup playoffs, is held at different venues throughout the country. It won't become official until the club's membership votes to accept on March 4, but sources say that isn't expected to be an issue.
SPORTS
January 14, 2015 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
IN 1910 THE Philadelphia Cricket Club hosted the U.S. Open for the second time in 4 years, on its St. Martins course in Chestnut Hill, nine holes of which are still there. In 2020 the Wissahickon and Militia Hill courses in Flourtown will be the site of the first USGA championship to be held at the club since then, the newly created U.S. Amateur men's Four-Ball. The inaugural championship is being held in early May at The Olympic Club in San Francisco, the first competition on the USGA schedule (the inaugural women's championship is the following week at Oregon's Bandon Dunes resort)
SPORTS
September 5, 2014 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
BEGINNING tomorrow at Bethlehem's historic Saucon Valley Country Club, 264 players will tee it up in the 34th U.S. Mid-Amateur Championship, which Berwyn's Jay Sigel won three times in a 5-year span in the mid-1980s. Defending champion Michael McCoy, who finally got his first USGA title at the age of 50 in his 38th USGA event, is in the field. As is four-time winner Nathan Smith, from western Pennsylvania. Thomas Olson, who turned 68 in June, is the oldest competitor. And Joseph Rice IV, who celebrated his 25th birthday last week, is the youngest - by 12 days over Andrew Wyatt.
SPORTS
July 31, 2014 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
BETHLEHEM - Mike McCoy pursued his dream for what must have seemed like forever. It took 36 years, but last year it finally happened for him. So maybe it's really true what they say about life and all those best things. "It was kind of the culmination of a long journey," he said Monday via speaker phone at Saucon Valley Country Club, where starting Sept. 6 he'll try to defend his U.S. Mid-Amateur title. "I've been trying to win a USGA championship since I tried to qualify for the U.S. junior at 14. " Nine months ago in the Country Club of Birmingham (Ala.)
SPORTS
July 2, 2014 | By Mike Kern, Daily News Staff Writer
WHEN THE FIRST U.S. Open at Merion in 32 years ended last June with Justin Rose holding a trophy that many were probably hoping would have been Phil Mickelson's, the conventional wisdom seemed to be that the venue had done enough to earn itself a fifth Open at some point. And the most logical return date appeared to be 2030, to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Bobby Jones completing his unprecedented Grand Slam there at the U.S. Amateur. Turns out it might not take nearly that long.
SPORTS
June 12, 2014 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Staff Writer
PINEHURST, N.C. - This Open is haunted. Perhaps 9 years ago, the last time Pinehurst No. 2 hosted the U.S. Open, it was too soon for any manifestation to have set in. There was plenty written and spoken in 2005 about Payne Stewart's death in a plane crash in 1999, but the atmosphere was not so . . . sad. Perhaps Stewart's soul was still adrift in some limbo, measuring its options before making its play. Certainly, the sense of loss and mortality did not descend on this Southern resort the way it has this week.
SPORTS
June 12, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
PINEHURST, N.C. - They were two players who would go on to become major champions and best buddies. But back in the early 1980s, Paul Azinger didn't know what to think when he met Payne Stewart. "I had a hard time liking him at first," Azinger said Tuesday. Stewart's brashness would subside over time. He matured into a gracious competitor and a fine family man who became an admired figure after he won the 1999 U.S. Open at Pinehurst Resort and Country Club, a victory that happened a little more than four months before he died in a plane crash.
SPORTS
June 11, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Will the U.S. Open return to Merion? That is a big question a year after the club played successful host to the championship following a three-decade absence. "I think we reset the odometer on the relevancy of Merion as a competitive golf course," Merion president Harry Hill said. "It's not old Merion that is no longer relevant compared to the 7,400-yard courses. Merion is still relevant. It can hold its own. " Hill said that the club has "indicated" to the U.S. Golf Association that it would be willing to host a future event, either a U.S. Open or a U.S. Amateur, and that USGA executive director Mike Davis told him "he believes Merion would be a wonderful site" for either championship.
SPORTS
June 10, 2014 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Staff Writer
PINEHURST, N.C. - It will be an exercise in tongue-biting, a lesson in lip-gnawing this week and next. When the men of the PGA descend on the new planet called Pinehurst No. 2, they will find themselves faced with an unfamiliar game for the second consecutive U.S. Open. The women, who play their Open on the same course the next week, might never return to North Carolina. Last year, short little Merion with its tight boundaries and its jungles of rough stressed club selection, commitment to uncomfortable lines and deciphering diabolical greens that most of the men had never seen before.
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