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SPORTS
January 28, 2001 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If there was any hope for compromise in the increasingly contentious battle between the U.S. Golf Association and Callaway Golf on the issue of the banned ERC II driver, it probably ended last week. Both sides - golf's governing body in the United States and the equipment giant - reiterated that they were doing what was best for golf and for golfers, and both made it clear that they would not budge. "We told them, if they drew the line in the sand, we were going to continue to make clubs that exceed them," a defiant Ely Callaway, founder and chairman of Callaway Golf, told the golf media at a company demonstration of the company's newest lines, including the nonconforming ERC II driver, at the annual PGA Merchandise Show.
SPORTS
May 22, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stu Ingraham has utilized an anchored stroke with a long putter for the last 23 years, a span during which he has won Philadelphia Section PGA player of the year honors on eight occasions including last year. So Ingraham strongly disagreed Tuesday with the joint decision by the U.S. Golf Association and the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews to ban an anchored putting stroke, either with a long putter or a belly putter, saying the stroke goes against the traditional golf swing where a club is gripped with both hands away from the body.
SPORTS
June 21, 2016 | By Mike Kern, Staff Writer
OAKMONT, Pa. - Say it ain't so. Not again. Golf is a game of rules, especially at the highest competitive levels. Non-golfers don't have to understand all of them, or even agree. They might think they're borderline anal sometimes, because they don't always make sense to them. And they aren't necessarily wrong. But rules are there for a reason. And they've been there forever. So hackers everywhere learn to live with them. And the consequences. Take the 2010 PGA Championship, when Dustin Johnson grounded his club in a fairway bunker before hitting his second shot on the 72nd hole.
SPORTS
June 26, 2013 | DAILY NEWS STAFF REPORT
STONEWALL LINKS, in Elverson, Chester County, will host the 2016 Mid-Amateur Championship, the USGA announced yesterday. It will be the first USGA championship held at Stonewall Links. The dates are Sept. 10-15. Stonewall Links is located 50 miles northwest of Philadelphia, and will host the event on its Tom Doak-designed Old and North Courses. The Old Course's design challenges players from tee to green and emphasizes accuracy and distance, while the North Course features more difficult green complexes and requires a more exacting short game.
SPORTS
January 14, 2001 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In laymen's terms, the dispute between Callaway Golf and the U.S. Golf Association is about how fast and how far a golf ball bounces off the face of the new ERC II driver. The clash began to take shape three years ago, when the USGA, the governing body for golf in this country, decided that manufacturers were developing clubs that could hit a golf ball too far. The USGA feared that eventually, as clubs were developed that could hit the ball even farther, golf courses and, indeed, the integrity of the game could be jeopardized.
SPORTS
September 17, 1986 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Merion Golf Club, the host for four U.S. Open championships, will welcome back the U.S. Golf Association twice in the next six years, when it hosts the 1989 U.S. Amateur and the 1992 U.S. Women's Open. Meade Geisel, the president at Merion, said yesterday that a contract had been signed with the USGA for both tournaments. The USGA plans a formal announcement today from its headquarters in Far Hills, N.J. Merion last hosted a U.S. Amateur in 1966; the 1989 Amateur will be its fifth.
SPORTS
June 18, 1998 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
Since 1984, the rules of golf have stated that "the material and construction of a club face shall not have the effect at impact of a spring. " Now, the U.S. Golf Association has proposed a test protocol to measure that effect. A lot of folks believe equipment advances are allowing players to hit the ball too far, and thereby threaten the integrity of the game. The USGA, which governs the game in this country, maintains that it is merely addressing those concerns. "The current language requires clarification," executive director David Fay said yesterday at the Olympic Club, site of the U.S. Open, which begins today.
SPORTS
September 14, 1997 | By Pamela F. Emory, FOR THE INQUIRER
Judy Bell, president of the United States Golf Association, worked over Labor Day. That wasn't all that unusual for an administrator of a major organization. What she was doing, however, had nothing to do with the royal and ancient game. "We were short of people at the deli," she said, referring to Bell's Deli, one of six businesses she owns or co-owns in Colorado Springs, Colo. "They called and asked me to come in and help with lunch. I took orders and made sandwiches. Then I had to stay and help set up for dinner.
SPORTS
April 6, 1990 | By Kevin Mulligan, Daily News Sports Writer
On the first day of the Masters, there was controversy. The United States Golf Association has banned the golf shoes worn in the past by John Huston. Huston, after shooting a 6-under-par 66, good for second place heading into today's second round, revealed that the USGA ruled illegal the Weight-Rite shoes he normally wears and endorses. This week, he is wearing a pair of flat Footjoys, which he purchased for $160. According to Huston, the USGA feels the Weight-Rites give him an unfair balance advantage; they feature a built-up outer edge of the soles.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Joe Juliano and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
The threat of severe weather for Thursday's opening round of the U.S. Open has U.S. Golf Association officials and the grounds staff at Merion Golf Club braced and prepared for anything on either side of the spectator ropes. Heavy rain and thunderstorms that could be severe, and strong wind and hail could make it a challenge for the USGA to get all 156 players around Merion's East Course, a layout that has been battered by 61/2 inches of rain since Friday. Already the weather has forced one change.
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SPORTS
June 21, 2016 | By Joe Juliano, STAFF WRITER
OAKMONT, Pa. – Shane Lowry smiled and was congenial with the assembled media after finishing the U.S. Open. But the hurt and disappointment showed themselves in his words. "Bitterly disappointed standing here," the 29-year-old Irishman said Sunday evening after giving up a 4-stroke lead he owned at the start of the final round and losing the Open by 3 strokes to Dustin Johnson at Oakmont Country Club. "It's not easy to get yourself in a position I got myself in today. It was there for the taking and I didn't take it. You can only learn from your mistakes and I always say it's only a mistake if you don't learn from it. I'm sure I learned a lot and I don't know what it is yet. But when I'm in that position again – and I know I will be – I'll handle it probably a little bit better.
SPORTS
June 21, 2016 | By Joe Juliano, STAFF WRITER
OAKMONT, Pa. – After everything Dustin Johnson had been through in majors, especially a pair of near-misses in the U.S. Open, it seemed unfair for him to play his last seven holes Sunday at Oakmont Country Club with a possible 1-stroke penalty hanging over his head. After viewing the video of his ball moving ever so slightly on the fifth green, officials of the U.S. Golf Association informed Johnson on the 12th tee that they would review the video with him after his round and appeared likely to penalize him. Johnson, however, remained determined and unflappable going for a championship in which he had been so close before and fallen short.
SPORTS
June 21, 2016 | By Mike Kern, Staff Writer
OAKMONT, Pa. - Say it ain't so. Not again. Golf is a game of rules, especially at the highest competitive levels. Non-golfers don't have to understand all of them, or even agree. They might think they're borderline anal sometimes, because they don't always make sense to them. And they aren't necessarily wrong. But rules are there for a reason. And they've been there forever. So hackers everywhere learn to live with them. And the consequences. Take the 2010 PGA Championship, when Dustin Johnson grounded his club in a fairway bunker before hitting his second shot on the 72nd hole.
SPORTS
June 14, 2016 | By Joe Juliano, STAFF WRITER
As a member at Merion Golf Club and the president of the Golf Association of Philadelphia, Robert Morey believed it would be an excellent idea to have the Philadelphia Amateur, the preeminent competition of the GAP season, contested at his home club. He wrote a letter to Merion's board to express the association's interest, and was delighted when the board approved the proposal immediately. When he relayed the decision to GAP officials, they all checked the history books to see when the championship was last contested at Merion, and were amazed at what they discovered.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Technology Writer
Uh oh, Father's Day is nigh. He might say "don't get me anything. " You don't have to listen. Déjà vu (all over again). Does Dad or Grandpop talk fondly of holding a transistor radio to his ear to listen to the ball game or Top 40 hits? Even if he doesn't, he'll get a kick from the CC Skywave from C. Crane, a more advanced example of the species. It tunes AM, FM, shortwave, weather, and air traffic bands, with favorites easily stored on the array of 10 preset buttons. With alarm clock functionality, it's apt for travelers.
SPORTS
August 13, 2015 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
EGG HARBOR TOWNSHIP, N.J. - Villanova's Buddy Marucci has played in more than 50 USGA championships in the last four-plus decades. He's seen the amateur game change, not always for the better. But when the U.S. Senior Amateur is played at Hidden Creek Golf Club from Sept. 26-Oct. 1, your 2008 champion thinks it'll seem just like old times. "You won't have coaches and sports psychologists, and all this other stuff," said the guy who took Tiger Woods to the limit in the 1995 U.S. Amateur final and captained the American team to victories in the 2007 and 2009 Walker Cups.
SPORTS
July 16, 2015 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
WE INTERRUPT this particularly dead time in our collective sports calendar to bring you the latest adventures of Donald Trump - a man who, when he isn't hosting a reality show, is one. I know: It's like feeding Canada geese, writing about this guy. It just produces more . . . well . . . mess. Trump is testing the limits of free speech and his own financial tolerance of it with this latest grab for attention, running for the nomination of a party that is already clearly running from him. He's like a human minesweeper for the Republicans, publicly testing out polarizing views that popularize Facebook pages but - even among a consortium of loose-cannon candidates - seem self-defeating for any serious presidential bid. By Trump's own admission, his insulting and inflammatory comments about Mexican immigrants - "bringing drugs . . . crime . . . they're rapists" - have already cost him millions.
SPORTS
July 14, 2015 | BY GARRETT MILEY, For the Daily News
LANCASTER - The 20-year-old South Korean cracked a smile and gently pumped her fist when she birdied No. 17 to move to 9-under for the tournament. In Gee Chun knew then that she had a very real chance to win the biggest event in women's golf. Chun came on like a freight train in the final round yesterday, chasing Amy Yang relentlessly after entering the day trailing Yang by three strokes. In dramatic fashion, she birdied four of the last seven holes en route to a final-round 66 and a one-shot victory over Yang in the the U.S. Women's Open at Lancaster Country Club.
SPORTS
July 11, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
LANCASTER - Turns out that Lancaster County, where according to Pennsylvania Dutch folklore everyone is named either Stoltzfus or Martin, is a fitting locale for the 70th U.S. Women's Open. At this event, it sometimes seemed on Thursday, nearly every golfer had one of two names: Lee or Kim. There were nine Lees on the Lancaster Country Club course along with six Kims. That means roughly one of every 10 competitors bore one of those popular Korean surnames. Unless you were a serious women's golf aficionado able to distinguish one from another, it could all be as comically confusing as Ruben Amaro's five-year plan for the Phillies.
SPORTS
July 6, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
LANCASTER - Though United States Golf Association executive director Mike Davis is himself a Central Pennsylvanian, the USGA and bucolic Lancaster appear to make for an odd coupling. The USGA, after all, is the blue-blazered embodiment of an elite Eastern establishment that has championed and ruled golf since the game crossed the Atlantic in the 19th century. Lancaster, meanwhile, brings to mind buggies, bacon gravy, and barley. But while that juxtaposition of old money and fresh manure figures to lend this week's 2015 U.S. Women's Open a unique flavor - and, possibly, scent - the Lancaster Country Club course where it will be contested would fit in easily on the Main Line or in the tony suburbs of Boston and New York.
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