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SPORTS
January 28, 2001 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If there was any hope for compromise in the increasingly contentious battle between the U.S. Golf Association and Callaway Golf on the issue of the banned ERC II driver, it probably ended last week. Both sides - golf's governing body in the United States and the equipment giant - reiterated that they were doing what was best for golf and for golfers, and both made it clear that they would not budge. "We told them, if they drew the line in the sand, we were going to continue to make clubs that exceed them," a defiant Ely Callaway, founder and chairman of Callaway Golf, told the golf media at a company demonstration of the company's newest lines, including the nonconforming ERC II driver, at the annual PGA Merchandise Show.
SPORTS
May 22, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stu Ingraham has utilized an anchored stroke with a long putter for the last 23 years, a span during which he has won Philadelphia Section PGA player of the year honors on eight occasions including last year. So Ingraham strongly disagreed Tuesday with the joint decision by the U.S. Golf Association and the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews to ban an anchored putting stroke, either with a long putter or a belly putter, saying the stroke goes against the traditional golf swing where a club is gripped with both hands away from the body.
SPORTS
June 26, 2013 | DAILY NEWS STAFF REPORT
STONEWALL LINKS, in Elverson, Chester County, will host the 2016 Mid-Amateur Championship, the USGA announced yesterday. It will be the first USGA championship held at Stonewall Links. The dates are Sept. 10-15. Stonewall Links is located 50 miles northwest of Philadelphia, and will host the event on its Tom Doak-designed Old and North Courses. The Old Course's design challenges players from tee to green and emphasizes accuracy and distance, while the North Course features more difficult green complexes and requires a more exacting short game.
SPORTS
January 14, 2001 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In laymen's terms, the dispute between Callaway Golf and the U.S. Golf Association is about how fast and how far a golf ball bounces off the face of the new ERC II driver. The clash began to take shape three years ago, when the USGA, the governing body for golf in this country, decided that manufacturers were developing clubs that could hit a golf ball too far. The USGA feared that eventually, as clubs were developed that could hit the ball even farther, golf courses and, indeed, the integrity of the game could be jeopardized.
SPORTS
September 17, 1986 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Merion Golf Club, the host for four U.S. Open championships, will welcome back the U.S. Golf Association twice in the next six years, when it hosts the 1989 U.S. Amateur and the 1992 U.S. Women's Open. Meade Geisel, the president at Merion, said yesterday that a contract had been signed with the USGA for both tournaments. The USGA plans a formal announcement today from its headquarters in Far Hills, N.J. Merion last hosted a U.S. Amateur in 1966; the 1989 Amateur will be its fifth.
SPORTS
June 18, 1998 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
Since 1984, the rules of golf have stated that "the material and construction of a club face shall not have the effect at impact of a spring. " Now, the U.S. Golf Association has proposed a test protocol to measure that effect. A lot of folks believe equipment advances are allowing players to hit the ball too far, and thereby threaten the integrity of the game. The USGA, which governs the game in this country, maintains that it is merely addressing those concerns. "The current language requires clarification," executive director David Fay said yesterday at the Olympic Club, site of the U.S. Open, which begins today.
SPORTS
September 14, 1997 | By Pamela F. Emory, FOR THE INQUIRER
Judy Bell, president of the United States Golf Association, worked over Labor Day. That wasn't all that unusual for an administrator of a major organization. What she was doing, however, had nothing to do with the royal and ancient game. "We were short of people at the deli," she said, referring to Bell's Deli, one of six businesses she owns or co-owns in Colorado Springs, Colo. "They called and asked me to come in and help with lunch. I took orders and made sandwiches. Then I had to stay and help set up for dinner.
SPORTS
April 6, 1990 | By Kevin Mulligan, Daily News Sports Writer
On the first day of the Masters, there was controversy. The United States Golf Association has banned the golf shoes worn in the past by John Huston. Huston, after shooting a 6-under-par 66, good for second place heading into today's second round, revealed that the USGA ruled illegal the Weight-Rite shoes he normally wears and endorses. This week, he is wearing a pair of flat Footjoys, which he purchased for $160. According to Huston, the USGA feels the Weight-Rites give him an unfair balance advantage; they feature a built-up outer edge of the soles.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Joe Juliano and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
The threat of severe weather for Thursday's opening round of the U.S. Open has U.S. Golf Association officials and the grounds staff at Merion Golf Club braced and prepared for anything on either side of the spectator ropes. Heavy rain and thunderstorms that could be severe, and strong wind and hail could make it a challenge for the USGA to get all 156 players around Merion's East Course, a layout that has been battered by 61/2 inches of rain since Friday. Already the weather has forced one change.
SPORTS
February 9, 2003 | By Joe Logan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At its annual meeting in San Diego last week, the U.S. Golf Association named Reed Mackenzie to a second and final year as president. Mackenzie, 60, a successful trial lawyer from suburban Minneapolis, became a USGA committeeman in 1977 and joined the Executive Committee in '92. He has worked as a rules official at every U.S. Open since 1978. In addition to being a four-time club champion at Hazeltine National Golf Club, site of last year's PGA Championship, Mackenzie is a passionate jazz fan and an accomplished saxophonist.
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SPORTS
July 11, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It might have been George Forster's longest day on a golf course in terms of the hours between his first and last shots. But in the end, he had his prize - a spot in this week's U.S. Senior Open. Forster, 57, the head professional at Radnor Valley Country Club in Villanova, is one of 26 club pros who will tee off in Thursday's first round of the 34th annual championship for players 50 and older. This year, it is being played at Omaha (Neb.) Country Club. In the June 19 Senior Open qualifier at Musket Ridge Country Club in Myersville, Md., Forster teed off in the first group and shot a 2-under-par 70. After a visit to the nearby Antietam National Battlefield, he returned to the course for a three-man playoff for the final berth and outlasted fellow Philadelphia Section PGA member Rob Shuey on the seventh hole.
SPORTS
June 26, 2013 | DAILY NEWS STAFF REPORT
STONEWALL LINKS, in Elverson, Chester County, will host the 2016 Mid-Amateur Championship, the USGA announced yesterday. It will be the first USGA championship held at Stonewall Links. The dates are Sept. 10-15. Stonewall Links is located 50 miles northwest of Philadelphia, and will host the event on its Tom Doak-designed Old and North Courses. The Old Course's design challenges players from tee to green and emphasizes accuracy and distance, while the North Course features more difficult green complexes and requires a more exacting short game.
SPORTS
June 19, 2013 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Staff Writer
MERION didn't win. Not really. Intelligence won. Imagination won. Wisdom and patience, humility and courage proved the difference at the 113th U.S. Open, as they so often do. Golfers with the sense to hone their long-iron game and pack an extra wedge and aim at the middles - fairways, greens, packs - gave themselves a chance. Golfers who routinely adapt to varied climates and grasses and time zones and backdrops fared best: internationals, amateurs, Mickelsons. The reputation of the U.S. Open's usual difficulty cost players more than blind tee shots and the white faces of Merion, as her bunkers are known.
SPORTS
June 19, 2013 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
SO WHAT EXACTLY might the future hold for Merion Golf Club, as far as hosting more USGA events, maybe even at some point a sixth U.S. Open? The fifth - but first in 32 years - ended Sunday with Justin Rose holding the trophy, his first at any major. For the most part, everything went about as well as could be expected, despite the obvious logistical issues that holding it on such a small piece of property entails. But since nobody broke par, there can be no more questions about the East Course withstanding the test of time.
SPORTS
June 19, 2013 | By Mike Kern, Daily News Staff Writer
FORMER USGA executive director David Fay, one of the people primarily responsible for bringing the U.S. Open back to Merion's East Course after a 32-year absence, probably put it best a few months back, when asked whether this would necessarily be the last national championship held in Ardmore. "Assuming the club wants it, and we always have to ask them because it might be too much of a hardship to go through, but if it plays out the way those of us who are fans of the club and the course think, hopefully there could be another one," he insisted.
SPORTS
June 19, 2013 | BY ANDREW ALBERT, Daily News Staff Writer alberta@phillynews.com
MERION GOLF CLUB is willing, and has now shown that it is able, to host another U.S. Open. Merion president Rick Ill has said before that the course would love to have the best players in the world compete in Ardmore. He said the process with the USGA already has been started. "Clearly, we are talking to the USGA about what we want back, and what they would favor us in coming back here," Ill said on Comcast SportsNet's "Philly Sports Talk" about the Open returning. "I would think that a little while back, even with a successful Open, we would probably not expect another Open for a long time.
SPORTS
June 18, 2013 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Somewhere in the late afternoon of the U.S. Open's third round on Saturday, as Tiger Woods stalked yet another errant tee shot, a proud local pierced through the perfunctory smatter of misplaced applause and yelled, "Merion's got teeth, Tiger. " This was not news to Woods, or to any of the 156 golfers who tested it during the Open, none of whom would manage par for the course, which certainly isn't for them. The United States Golf Association took what Merion had already done in toughening the layout, and used deep cuts of rough and persnickety pin placements to keep the golfers humble, and all of them left saying very respectful things about the course.
SPORTS
June 18, 2013 | BY ANDREW ALBERT, Daily News Staff Writer alberta@phillynews.com
MERION LIVED up to U.S. Open standards. To say that the East Course challenged the best in the world and held its own would be an understatement. After rumblings that the course would be too easy for these pros, Merion bit into every single golfer in the field. Not one player finished under par, one of the signatures of a U.S. Open. Players had under-par rounds, sure, but none could string any together and make them stick. Phil Mickelson, who was in the lead, and under par for much of the tournament, could not hold on to the red yesterday.
SPORTS
June 18, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rick Ill enjoyed the entire week of the U.S. Open at Merion Golf Club, from dining with Arnold Palmer and Phil Mickelson to the champions' dinner to hanging out with 1981 Open winner David Graham to all the favorable comments about the East Course. And after Justin Rose collected the championship trophy on Sunday night, Ill, who chaired the club's U.S. Open committee, spoke at a reception and said, "It was great to have our 18th USGA championship and, for all you members out there, we're working on the 19th.
SPORTS
June 18, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the U.S. Open trophy sparkled in the fading Sunday sunlight and the smiling champion attached to it, Justin Rose, posed for the cameras, you had to wonder whether such a scene would ever be repeated at Merion Golf Club. It's not that the old course didn't give the golf world everything it wanted during Open week. Rose's victorious total of 1-over-par 281 proved that. The mystery of Merion's greens went unsolved. The rough yielded little. And its myriad hazards had nearly as many visitors as the merchandise tent.
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