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SPORTS
December 29, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
A U.S. Olympic Committee panel probing bribery allegations will hold its first meeting today in Washington, D.C. The special commission will examine the methods used by Salt Lake bid committee officials to obtain the 2002 Winter Olympics in Utah. Officials from the 2002 Winter Games organizing committee will not be in attendance. No agenda for the meeting has been released, but it probably will involve planning and scheduling for the commission's actions over the coming weeks.
SPORTS
September 6, 1991 | the Inquirer Staff
Robert Helmick, president of the U.S. Olympic Committee, will discuss with the USOC's executive board tomorrow reports that he worked as a paid consultant to several sports companies with at least indirect ties to the Olympic movement. Helmick, an attorney from Des Moines, admitted to USA Today that he has represented clients who do business with either the USOC or Olympic sports, but said those dealings have presented no conflicts of interest. USA Today reported yesterday that Helmick received at least $127,000 from those dealings in 1990.
SPORTS
April 16, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
Robert Helmick, a former U.S. Olympic Committee president who resigned amid conflict-of-interest allegations, died yesterday at 66. Helmick died of cardiac failure at Iowa Methodist Medical Center in Des Moines, Iowa, spokeswoman Angie Fagervik-Chia said. He had a stroke last weekend, law partner David Claypool said. Helmick, a Des Moines lawyer, was USOC president from 1985 to 1991. He resigned as USOC president and as an IOC member in 1991 after he was accused of using his position for personal gain.
SPORTS
January 22, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
The top leadership of the U.S. Olympic Committee urged USOC president Marty Mankamyer to resign yesterday, blaming her for infighting within the organization. The turmoil that has consumed the USOC and attracted the attention of Congress escalated once again when all five USOC vice presidents and two other top officials said Mankamyer should quit. In the process, they also revealed that Mankamyer was privately asked to resign last week and promised that she would. However, the officials said Mankamyer reneged and hasn't returned their phone calls since.
SPORTS
January 21, 2003 | Daily News Staff and Wire Reports
The U.S. Olympic Committee plans an independent investigation of Lloyd Ward following the resignation of five members angered by his exoneration on ethics charges. The investigation comes amid a report in the Los Angeles Times yesterday that the U.S. Justice Department plans to send officials to the Dominican Republic to investigate a deal between the 2003 Pan American Games and a company with ties to Ward's brother. Justice Department spokeswoman Monica Goodling declined comment to the Associated Press on the reported investigation.
SPORTS
July 31, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
The U.S. Olympic Committee will be in New York City starting today to evaluate sites for the city's bid for the 2012 Olympic Games. Members of the USOC will stay three days and visit Yankee Stadium, Madison Square Garden and other potential sites, Mayor Rudolph Giuliani said yesterday. "It would be wonderful for the spirit of the city," Giuliani said. "It would be a wonderful thing for the city to build toward and to show its renaissance and how it's changed. But it would also be wonderful for the Olympics because you could not be in a place that could give the Olympics more attention.
SPORTS
January 14, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
Lloyd Ward will remain head of the U.S. Olympic Committee despite trying to steer Pan Am Games business to a company with ties to his brother. The 23-member USOC executive committee reprimanded Ward yesterday, saying he "created the appearance of a conflict of interest. " "Lloyd's job was not in danger at any point," USOC vice president Bill Stapleton said. "This group of people understands that he committed an error in judgment and that is to be dealt with in a process that any other executive would have to go through.
SPORTS
March 6, 2009 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Jim Scherr resigned as chief executive officer of the U.S. Olympic Committee yesterday, an awkwardly timed move that comes with the federation's attempting to climb out of a financial hole while bidding to bring the 2016 Olympics to Chicago. Scherr will be replaced on an interim basis by Stephanie Streeter, a member of the USOC board of directors. Al Michaels is returning to the event for which he made his iconic call. The announcer will serve as a host for NBC's coverage of next year's Winter Olympics from Vancouver, the 30th anniversary of his call of the "Miracle on Ice. " Michaels famously exclaimed, "Do you believe in miracles?
SPORTS
December 4, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
When she ran for president of U.S. Swimming in 1984, Sandra Baldwin encountered a powerful foe - Bill Lippman, widely known as the father of the sport in America. "He told me he didn't think swimming was ready for a woman president," Baldwin recalled. "I told him, 'Maybe not, Bill, but they're ready for me.' " Yesterday, 16 years after Baldwin unanimously won that election to become the first female president of any widely based American sport, the U.S. Olympic Committee decided it finally was ready for a woman as leader, too, and that Baldwin once again was the one to choose.
SPORTS
January 6, 2010 | Daily News Staff and Wire Reports
The U.S. Olympic Committee has turned to Scott Blackmun, a former interim leader for the organization, to become its third chief executive officer in the past 10 months, the Associated Press has learned. Two people familiar with the search said yesterday that Blackmun would be announced as the CEO today. They spoke on condition of anonymity because the decision had not yet been made public. Blackmun will replace Stephanie Streeter, who took over when Jim Scherr was ousted in March.
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NEWS
May 30, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
A year after enthusiastically announcing that Philadelphia was throwing in its hat to seek the 2024 Summer Olympic Games, Mayor Nutter has pulled that hat back. Citing concerns about cost and the logistics of hosting other large events here in the near future, Nutter said the timing was just not right. "The time, the effort, the fund-raising, the prospect of creating new venues . . . it is a tremendous, costly endeavor," Nutter said Wednesday. "We decided that, at this time, we would not put in or submit a bid. " The mayor notified the U.S. Olympic Committee earlier this month of the city's decision not to pursue a bid to host the 2024 summer games.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2013 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
LONDON - Hoping to win Olympic gold for Philadelphia in 2024, Mayor Nutter has spent time on his trade trip here seeking tips from the hosts of the 2012 Summer Games. The Olympics figured into private discussions with government officials and were a visible part of his agenda Wednesday when he visited the site of the Games here. Earlier this week, Nutter met with Sir John Armitt, who ran the Olympic Delivery Authority, which organized London's effort. Highlights: The Games cost $12.5 billion, of which $1.5 billion came from London.
SPORTS
October 7, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
PARK CITY, Utah - Much like the symbolic flame that last week began its journey from Greece to Sochi, Russia, once a political controversy is stoked in advance of an Olympic Games, it is nearly impossible to extinguish. Disputes involving wars, terrorism, and racial injustice here and abroad have marked earlier Olympics as indelibly as any athlete. Think of the Nazism on display in Berlin in 1936 or the black-power salutes in Mexico City in 1968. Now, with four months remaining before the 2014 Winter Games start in the remote Black Sea resort, the issue of gay rights has attached itself to these Olympics like a sixth ring.
NEWS
April 24, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
COULD Philadelphia host the 2024 Olympics? Mayor Nutter sent a letter to the United States Olympic Committee (USOC) Monday confirming the city has an interest in bidding on the Olympic games. "The city of Philadelphia shares the USOC's dedication to building a spectacular experience for Olympic athletes, the Olympic family and the watching world," Nutter said in a statement. "We have had great success partnering with other organizations to host world-class events, and we are committed to working cooperatively and effectively under the direction of the USOC in the months - and hopefully - years ahead.
NEWS
April 24, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano and Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writers
Will Olympians scull on the Schuylkill, spike beach volleyballs in Wildwood, pole vault in Fairmount Park? Mayor Nutter would like to think so. On Monday, he told the U.S. Olympic Committee in a letter that the Philadelphia region is "enthusiastically" embracing the prospect of bidding on and hosting the Olympics and Paralympics in 2024. "I am honored to confirm our wholehearted commitment and interest in working with the USOC to bid on the 2024 Games," Nutter wrote to Scott Blackmun, chief executive of the committee in Colorado Springs.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Seven years ago, Philadelphia was among five U.S. cities seeking to qualify to host the 2016 Summer Olympic Games, but it failed to make it to the medal round. The U.S. Olympic Committee wants to know if the city is ready to get back in the game. Letters went out this week to gauge interest for 2024 among the nation's 25 largest cities - including Philadelphia - and 10 others, the USOC said. Mark McDonald, Mayor Nutter's spokesman, was noncommittal Wednesday about whether the city would apply, but he spoke enthusiastically about what an honor it would be to host the Games.
NEWS
July 17, 2012 | Stu Bykofsky
WHAT WERE they thinking? Is the U.S. Olympic Committee, and conspirator Ralph Lauren, so clueless of American consciousness that they didn't know producing USOC-authorized gear in China would be a gut-punch to most Americans? When it was learned the "Made in China" label would be found in the Team USA apparel in the opening and closing ceremonies, it even awakened the dwarfs in Congress, creating a rare bipartisan moment when zany opposites such as Nancy Pelosi and John Boehner would blast away at the same target.
SPORTS
July 15, 2012 | Associated Press
Dancers were performing during breaks in the action. Dunks were greeted with "MVP!" chants. Mascots, merchandise giveaways, and hot dog stands had the feel of an NBA arena, not the U.S. Olympic men's team's workout. Of course this was no game. As Allen Iverson would say: We talkin' about practice. The U.S. Olympic basketball team went through an open practice for military personnel and families at the D.C. Armory that felt more like Midnight Madness on a college campus than a team getting ready to defend gold.
NEWS
July 12, 2012 | BY ANNA PAN, Daily News Staff Writer
IN A CONTEST over a humble lunch counter in Reading Terminal Market, the U.S. Olympic Committee won't win a gold medal for sprinting. Three decades after it burst from the starting block, the Greek eatery Olympic Gyro has received a cease-and-desist email from the USOC, the nonprofit corporation responsible for training and funding U.S. teams. The June 7 notice demanded deletion of the word "Olympic" from the food shop's title, claiming copyright of the word under a 1978 law. Congress granted the USOC all commercial use of Olympic imagery and terminology in the nation, including the word "Olympic" and the symbol of five interlocked rings.
SPORTS
April 24, 2012
LeRoy Walker, 93, the first African American president of the U.S. Olympic Committee who attended the Penn Relays for six decades as a coach and referee, died Monday in Durham, N.C. Dr. Walker spent more than 40 years at North Carolina Central, first as track coach and later as chancellor. During his career, he coached eight Olympians who won a total of 11 medals, including back-to-back golds by hurdler Lee Calhoun in 1956 and 1960. Dr. Walker became the first African American coach of the U.S. Olympic men's track and field team in 1976 and led the squad to 22 medals, including six gold.
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