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NEWS
July 28, 2011
TRENTON - Fifty retail outlets in New Jersey face possible closure as the U.S. Postal Service looks to cut costs. The locations under study include Dividing Creek in Cumberland County; Goshen in Cape May County; and Stafford, Harvey Cedars, and Long Beach in Ocean County. The Postal Service, which lost $8 billion last year, announced Tuesday that it was looking at closing more than 3,600 of its more than 31,000 local offices, branches, and stations nationwide. Business has declined sharply in recent years as Internet options have replaced first-class mail, and the recession led to a decline in advertising mail.
NEWS
December 29, 2008 | By KITTY CAPARELLA, caparek@phillynews.com 215-854-5880
Top officials of the U.S. Postal Service and the American Postal Workers Union are monitoring the serious mail problems in Philadelphia. But William Burrus, national president of the APWU, warned of an even worse problem on the horizon than "just the delay of the mail. " With a nearly $3 billion loss in fiscal '08, and a projected deficit of up to $5 billion in the current year, the USPS is "close to not being able to sustain a national postal-service system to the public," Burrus said.
NEWS
November 6, 2009 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Postal Service has violated federal regulations by failing to provide financial details that justify the planned closing of a mail-processing facility in Gloucester County, according to U.S. Rep. Robert E. Andrews. The Postal Service has said it would save $3.3 million, plus a "significant" amount in labor costs, by shuttering the Philadelphia Logistics and Distribution Center in Logan Township, the South Jersey Democrat said. The facility employs about 600 people. Andrews said yesterday that he had been denied an accounting of how the savings would be achieved.
NEWS
May 8, 2012 | Stu Bykofsky
CONTRARY TO what you may have heard, I don't enjoy kicking people when they're down. The U.S. Postal Service is down — in employees, post offices, revenue and first-class mail it moves — but I'm not kicking here. I'm reporting on the minority of USPS employees who don't seem able to put on a hat without instructions. Most people I asked (through Facebook and personal conversations) are satisfied with the post office, and some say they have warm relations with their letter carriers.
NEWS
December 16, 2008
A Daily News series has chronicled alleged mismanagement of the U.S. Postal Service's Southwest Philly processing plant, including stories that exposed major delivery delays and instances of allegedly undercounted or discarded mail. If you have experienced problems with mail delivery, call the USPS at 215-863-5049 and/or reporter Kitty Caparella at 215-854-5880.
NEWS
December 15, 2008
I'M A RETIRED letter carrier, 31 years in the postal service, 30 years as a union steward. The problems that you've described in your stories are not new. They've been going on for years, since the USPS started the bonus policy. I wrote the postmaster general myself, and he just passed the buck. I'm glad your paper has made the public aware of this. Jack Devine Huntingdon Valley
NEWS
August 5, 2010
UNFORTUNATELY, columnist Stu Bykofsky had a bad customer experience with the U.S. Postal Service. Two comments: First, the post office is forecasting a $7 billion loss, not due to loss of mail volume but to funding of future retirees' health fund at a cost of $5.5 billion a year, mandated by the 2006 Postal Reorganization Act. There is pending legislation to correct this problem. Second, Byko seems to suggest the USPS just recently stopped receiving government funds - in fact that has been the case since 1971, almost 40 years.
NEWS
August 10, 2010 | By ROBERT R. SCHRUM
THE POSTAL Service recently announced it would seek to raise stamp prices to 46 cents in 2011. The agency claims the 4.5-percent rate hike is necessary to help cover the nearly quarter-trillion-dollar shortfall it faces over the next 10 years. USPS may enjoy a short-term bump in revenue thanks to the increase, as consumers begrudgingly shell out an extra 40 cents for a book of stamps. But continued price hikes will only accelerate the decline in mail volume that the agency has been battling for years.
SPORTS
July 4, 1997 | By Ron Reid, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If the U.S. Postal Service would do as well as the professional cycling team that will carry its colors into the 84th Tour de France tomorrow, it wouldn't be asking another penny for a first-class stamp. Indeed, the USPS riders have competed on the international cycling circuit not quite two full seasons, but their record already is an overnight success story. It started a year ago in Philadelphia, when Eddy Gragus of Boulder, Colo., gave the team its first national individual title by winning the 156-mile CoreStates U.S. Pro Cycling Championship, with a powerful finishing sprint.
SPORTS
March 2, 2012 | BY MARK KRAM, Daily News Staff Writer
IT BEGAN with a column that Donald Hunt penned in the Philadelphia Tribune . Four years later, he and the committee he helped form have collected 55,000 signatures on a petition and have received letters from an array of high-profile figures in support of their objective: to persuade the United States Postal Service to commemorate basketball icon Wilt Chamberlain with a stamp. Given that it was 50 years ago today that Chamberlain became the only pro player ever to score 100 points in a game, Hunt had hoped a stamp would be issued this year in honor of the former Overbrook High School and 76ers star.
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NEWS
October 13, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
JOSEPH HIGHTOWER says U.S. postal investigators agree he got ripped off last year when he bought a $600 money order to pay his rent. But no one in the Postal Service can tell Hightower when he'll be refunded the cash he paid to a postal worker at the 30th near Chestnut Street branch on Nov. 23. "That's a lot of money," says Hightower, an occupational therapist who works with kids. The money order was apparently counterfeit. It bounced. "That made me short for Christmas. I've been trying to catch up. " When Hightower told me his story, I presumed he'd bought his money order from postal worker Felicia Townsend, who was charged last week with stealing $28,642.31 customers paid for money orders.
NEWS
April 11, 2013 | By Pauline Jelinek, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The beleaguered U.S. Postal Service backed down from its cost-saving plan to eliminate Saturday mail delivery, acknowledging that Congress barred a move that supporters said was essential to addressing the agency's dire financial condition. Despite the retreat, the governing board said Wednesday that it was not possible for the Postal Service to meet its goals for reduced spending without altering the delivery schedule. Delaying "responsible changes," the board said, only makes it more likely that the Postal Service "may become a burden" to taxpayers.
NEWS
February 7, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Saturday mail may soon go the way of the Pony Express and penny postcards. The Postal Service said Wednesday that it plans to cut back to five-day-a-week deliveries for everything except packages to stem its financial losses in a world radically re-ordered by the Internet. But Congress has voted in the past to bar the idea of eliminating Saturday delivery, and this announcement immediately drew protests from some lawmakers. The plan, which is to take effect in August, also brought vigorous objections from farmers, the letter carriers' union and others.
NEWS
November 23, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Emboldened by rapid growth in e-commerce shipping, the cash-strapped Postal Service is moving aggressively this holiday season to start a premium service for the Internet shopper seeking the instant gratification of a store purchase: same-day package delivery. Teaming up with major retailers, the post office will begin the expedited service in San Francisco on Dec. 12 at a price similar to its competitors'. If things run smoothly, the program will quickly expand next year to other big cities such as Boston, Chicago and New York.
NEWS
August 7, 2012 | By Scott Bomboy, CONSTITUTION DAILY
Bomboy is Editor-in-Chief of the National Constitution Center As the United States Postal Service misses key financial payments, critics and supporters speculate about bankruptcy or worse for an institution that predates the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence. USPS officials have said they will miss two benefit payments mandated by Congress, which has caused a whirlwind of speculation about the future of the Postal Service. The United States Postal Service is one of the few current government institutions spelled out in the Constitution.
SPORTS
May 23, 2012 | The Inquirer Staff
Former basketball star Melissa Rotz will receive her doctor of Pharmacy degree and deliver the valedictory speech at the University of the Sciences graduation ceremony on Wednesday night at the Mann Center. Rotz, a graduate of Central Dauphin High School, was the women's basketball player of the year on the 2011 Inquirer all-academic team, chosen from the Philadelphia region's Division II and III schools. A four-year starter on the women's basketball team, Rotz has the distinction of graduating from University of the Sciences with the most individual academic honors ever won by a student-athlete at the institution, earning a dozen such awards over her career while performing as the team's starting point guard, the university said.
NEWS
May 8, 2012 | Stu Bykofsky
CONTRARY TO what you may have heard, I don't enjoy kicking people when they're down. The U.S. Postal Service is down — in employees, post offices, revenue and first-class mail it moves — but I'm not kicking here. I'm reporting on the minority of USPS employees who don't seem able to put on a hat without instructions. Most people I asked (through Facebook and personal conversations) are satisfied with the post office, and some say they have warm relations with their letter carriers.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - The Senate offered a lifeline to the nearly bankrupt U.S. Postal Service on Wednesday, voting to give the struggling agency an $11 billion cash infusion while delaying controversial decisions on closing post offices and ending Saturday delivery. By a 62-37 vote, senators approved a measure that had divided mostly along rural-urban lines. Over the past several weeks, the bill was modified more than a dozen times, adding new restrictions on closings and cuts to service that rural-state senators said would hurt their communities the most.
NEWS
March 10, 2012
A story Friday about changes in the U.S. Postal Service did not provide full context about USPS employment figures. The Postal Service is the core of a broader trillion-dollar mailing industry that employs more than eight million people. That industry includes, among others, private envelope manufacturers, suppliers, and mailing houses - companies that help other organizations prepare their mail for Postal Service delivery. In its 2011 annual report, the Postal Service said it employed 645,950 people.
SPORTS
March 2, 2012 | BY MARK KRAM, Daily News Staff Writer
IT BEGAN with a column that Donald Hunt penned in the Philadelphia Tribune . Four years later, he and the committee he helped form have collected 55,000 signatures on a petition and have received letters from an array of high-profile figures in support of their objective: to persuade the United States Postal Service to commemorate basketball icon Wilt Chamberlain with a stamp. Given that it was 50 years ago today that Chamberlain became the only pro player ever to score 100 points in a game, Hunt had hoped a stamp would be issued this year in honor of the former Overbrook High School and 76ers star.
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