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Uterine Cancer

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NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The husband of a Berks County woman who died of a rare uterine cancer following a minimally invasive hysterectomy is suing the maker of the device used in her surgery at Reading Hospital. The lawsuit, filed Friday in federal court in Philadelphia, adds to controversy over electric tissue-cutting "morcellators. " The devices let doctors remove tissue through tiny abdominal incisions, shortening patients' hospitalization and recovery. In rare cases, the process can disseminate an aggressive uterine cancer, leiomyosarcoma, that routine diagnostic tests usually miss.
NEWS
April 24, 1994 | By Fawn Vrazo and Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In April 1992 the federal government posed this challenge to American women: Would you be willing to take a potentially harmful drug for five years to help determine whether it prevents breast cancer? Thousands of women said yes, and the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial - one of the nation's largest cancer-prevention studies ever - was off to a quick start. Healthy women at higher-than-average risk of getting the disease flocked to 270 hospital study sites to sign up to take the drug tamoxifen in the intriguing experiment.
NEWS
June 22, 1991 | By Fawn Vrazo, Inquirer Staff Writer
An influential Food and Drug Administration panel yesterday paved the way for new types of hormone drugs for menopausal women that may look very much like the birth-control pills younger women take now. Members of the FDA's Fertility and Maternal Health Advisory Committee acknowledged that they knew little about the health risks and benefits of such drugs, including their relation to breast cancer. But they concluded that the FDA is ready to consider applications for new combination estrogen- progesterone pills, if only to encourage drug companies to develop more safety data about them.
NEWS
April 1, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The husband-and-wife doctors who have turned their personal tragedy into a public health crusade are getting traction. Cardiothoracic surgeon Hooman Noorchashm and his wife, anesthesiologist Amy Reed, 40 - both trained in Philadelphia and affiliated with Harvard Medical School - want electric tissue-cutting morcellators banned from gynecologic surgery. Power morcellation, introduced in 1993, enables tissue removal through tiny abdominal incisions, but in rare cases it can also spread a hidden uterine cancer called leiomyosarcoma.
NEWS
February 6, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: My 41-year-old daughter was diagnosed with breast cancer at an early stage. She opted for a bilateral mastectomy and chemotherapy. There was some lymph-node involvement. Her doctor is now trying to talk her into five years of Tamoxifen. I worry about the side effects like cataracts, stroke, aneurysm, and uterine cancer. Isn't a bilateral mastectomy followed by chemo enough? Answer: Research shows that using the anti-estrogen drug Tamoxifen in women who have had breast cancer reduces the chance that the breast cancer will return by up to 50 percent.
NEWS
May 22, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two doctors' groups are defending a tissue-cutting device that makes gynecological surgery less invasive but in rare cases spreads a hidden uterine cancer. Electric morcellators, introduced in 1993, are used to dissect the uterus or uterine fibroids so tissue can be removed through small abdominal incisions. They have come under scrutiny in recent months because the motorized blade can disseminate bits of undetected cancer. Many hospitals have halted their use; the Food and Drug Administration last month issued a safety advisory "discouraging" power morcellation; and Johnson & Johnson suspended worldwide sales of its version of the machine.
NEWS
June 9, 2005
Anne Bancroft played only a supporting role in one of the most delicious stories about her. It was Oscar night more than 40 years ago and Bancroft was up for Best Actress for her portrayal of Annie Sullivan in the film version of The Miracle Worker. Expecting to win was Bette Davis, whose costar in Whatever Happened to Baby Jane, Joan Crawford, was snubbed that year by the Academy Award nominators. Crawford had agreed to accept on behalf of Bancroft, who couldn't break away from a New York stage engagement.
NEWS
November 9, 1994 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After being shaken by scandal and closed down for seven months by the federal government, America's largest - and only - breast cancer prevention study is starting up again. Sought by researchers: 5,000 healthy women willing to take a potentially risky drug to determine if it can stop breast cancer before it begins. Officials at the University of Pittsburgh today announced the resumption of enrollment in the study at 10 hospitals, including the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 7, 1998 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
A drug used for years to fight advanced breast cancer actually prevented the disease in nearly half of the high-risk women in a four-year study, but its serious side effects prompted a leading women's health group yesterday to blast the therapy as "substituting one disease for another. " National Cancer Institute chief Dr. Richard Klausner, in announcing the results at a news conference in Washington yesterday, admitted the side effects included an increased risk of uterine cancer and blood clots, but he defended the therapy's life-saving benefits.
NEWS
March 16, 2009 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Curtis Opera Theatre's production of Wozzeck rolled onto the Perelman Theater stage Friday with such unstoppable momentum that the temptation was to duck - as though that would offer protection from the merciless glare of its awful truth. So it is with this masterpiece of German expressionism: awful becomes awe-ful. Though this wasn't the most penetrating encounter I've had with Alban Berg's opera, Curtis' production (in collaboration with the Opera Company of Philadelphia and the Kimmel Center)
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NEWS
May 22, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two doctors' groups are defending a tissue-cutting device that makes gynecological surgery less invasive but in rare cases spreads a hidden uterine cancer. Electric morcellators, introduced in 1993, are used to dissect the uterus or uterine fibroids so tissue can be removed through small abdominal incisions. They have come under scrutiny in recent months because the motorized blade can disseminate bits of undetected cancer. Many hospitals have halted their use; the Food and Drug Administration last month issued a safety advisory "discouraging" power morcellation; and Johnson & Johnson suspended worldwide sales of its version of the machine.
NEWS
April 1, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The husband-and-wife doctors who have turned their personal tragedy into a public health crusade are getting traction. Cardiothoracic surgeon Hooman Noorchashm and his wife, anesthesiologist Amy Reed, 40 - both trained in Philadelphia and affiliated with Harvard Medical School - want electric tissue-cutting morcellators banned from gynecologic surgery. Power morcellation, introduced in 1993, enables tissue removal through tiny abdominal incisions, but in rare cases it can also spread a hidden uterine cancer called leiomyosarcoma.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The husband of a Berks County woman who died of a rare uterine cancer following a minimally invasive hysterectomy is suing the maker of the device used in her surgery at Reading Hospital. The lawsuit, filed Friday in federal court in Philadelphia, adds to controversy over electric tissue-cutting "morcellators. " The devices let doctors remove tissue through tiny abdominal incisions, shortening patients' hospitalization and recovery. In rare cases, the process can disseminate an aggressive uterine cancer, leiomyosarcoma, that routine diagnostic tests usually miss.
NEWS
November 23, 2012 | By Mark Kennedy, Associated Press
NEW YORK - If you've ever fired up your computer and cringed in anticipation of what nasty e-mails await, pity Eve Ensler. The Tony Award-winning playwright and activist gets a daily record sent to her of atrocities against women - a never-ending drumbeat of rape, genital mutilation, imprisonment, and murder. "In my inbox on any given day, I can tell you every single story of any violation that's happening to women anywhere in the world," Ensler says. "It's horrifying. My inbox is like a nightmare.
NEWS
August 2, 2012 | By Debra Nussbaum, For The Inquirer
One year after my mother's hysterectomy for uterine cancer, a scan taken in July 2011 showed two small spots in the pelvic region that were most likely the return of her cancer. She received the news on her 84th birthday. Her doctor recommended a biopsy and then 18 weeks of chemotherapy treatments, followed by radiation. She would lose her hair, she might struggle with nausea, and the radiation held some risks due to other organs in the pelvic area. Sitting with my mother in an office in New York City, across the desk from her oncologist, I heard her say, in a calm and confident voice: "I don't want any further treatment.
NEWS
February 6, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: My 41-year-old daughter was diagnosed with breast cancer at an early stage. She opted for a bilateral mastectomy and chemotherapy. There was some lymph-node involvement. Her doctor is now trying to talk her into five years of Tamoxifen. I worry about the side effects like cataracts, stroke, aneurysm, and uterine cancer. Isn't a bilateral mastectomy followed by chemo enough? Answer: Research shows that using the anti-estrogen drug Tamoxifen in women who have had breast cancer reduces the chance that the breast cancer will return by up to 50 percent.
NEWS
March 16, 2009 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Curtis Opera Theatre's production of Wozzeck rolled onto the Perelman Theater stage Friday with such unstoppable momentum that the temptation was to duck - as though that would offer protection from the merciless glare of its awful truth. So it is with this masterpiece of German expressionism: awful becomes awe-ful. Though this wasn't the most penetrating encounter I've had with Alban Berg's opera, Curtis' production (in collaboration with the Opera Company of Philadelphia and the Kimmel Center)
NEWS
June 16, 2008 | By Michael Smerconish
Deep in the bowels of the Internet, the swift- boating of Barack Obama is under way. That's where the presumptive Democratic nominee is "revealed" to be a Muslim who joined Chicago's Trinity United Church of Christ as a Manchurian candidate. This, I suppose, would explain why he took his oath of office for the Senate on the Koran instead of the Bible, as alleged. (That, too, turns out to be a falsehood - he used his personal Bible for the oath.) No wonder he refuses to recite the Pledge of Allegiance.
NEWS
June 9, 2005
Anne Bancroft played only a supporting role in one of the most delicious stories about her. It was Oscar night more than 40 years ago and Bancroft was up for Best Actress for her portrayal of Annie Sullivan in the film version of The Miracle Worker. Expecting to win was Bette Davis, whose costar in Whatever Happened to Baby Jane, Joan Crawford, was snubbed that year by the Academy Award nominators. Crawford had agreed to accept on behalf of Bancroft, who couldn't break away from a New York stage engagement.
NEWS
May 15, 1998 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer
For two agonizing months, she thought she was dying of cancer. The 45-year-old woman from North Philadelphia thought she had uterine cancer and that she was going to have a hysterectomy. At least that's what the Puerto Rican woman, who speaks very limited English, understood from the doctor through her 8-year-old daughter's translation. When the hospital called to reschedule her surgery, the woman got upset and called Rosa Ortiz, a support worker at the American Cancer Society.
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