CollectionsUterine Cancer
IN THE NEWS

Uterine Cancer

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A renowned Boston medical center was ordered by a judge Tuesday to stop imposing extraordinary security measures on a Bucks County cancer patient and her husband, who have been sharply critical of Brigham and Women's Hospital. The Massachusetts judge agreed with the couple, Amy Reed and Hooman Noorchashm, that the security was intended to intimidate them, and violated their right to free speech as well as the hospital's own policies. Hospital officials declined to comment. Reed, 42, an anesthesiologist at the University of Pennsylvania, and Noorchashm, 43, a cardiac surgeon at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, have led a highly effective national campaign to ban a gynecological surgical device that Brigham doctors used to perform her hysterectomy two years ago. The tissue-slicing device, an electric morcellator, spread her hidden uterine cancer - a danger that they have since publicized.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The dangers of a power tool used in gynecological surgery have been debated for more than a year, with experts offering varying estimates of the chance that an undetected uterine cancer would be spread - and likely worsened - by the tissue-slicing device. Now, two new studies have waded into the controversy. Using a nationwide insurance claims database, Columbia University researchers looked at women treated for uterine growths called fibroids. Uterine cancer was discovered in one out of every 1,073 who underwent power morcellation, and one out of 528 without morcellation.
NEWS
April 24, 1994 | By Fawn Vrazo and Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In April 1992 the federal government posed this challenge to American women: Would you be willing to take a potentially harmful drug for five years to help determine whether it prevents breast cancer? Thousands of women said yes, and the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial - one of the nation's largest cancer-prevention studies ever - was off to a quick start. Healthy women at higher-than-average risk of getting the disease flocked to 270 hospital study sites to sign up to take the drug tamoxifen in the intriguing experiment.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amy Reed, the doctor who has pushed for a ban on the gynecological surgery device that worsened her uterine cancer prognosis, said Wednesday that she is fighting a recurrence. Reed, 41, had about a year in apparent remission after her 2013 diagnosis and treatment for leiomyosarcoma, a rare and ferociously aggressive uterine cancer. Two weeks ago, she had surgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania to remove a small tumor that a scan revealed in the bony part of her spinal column.
NEWS
June 22, 1991 | By Fawn Vrazo, Inquirer Staff Writer
An influential Food and Drug Administration panel yesterday paved the way for new types of hormone drugs for menopausal women that may look very much like the birth-control pills younger women take now. Members of the FDA's Fertility and Maternal Health Advisory Committee acknowledged that they knew little about the health risks and benefits of such drugs, including their relation to breast cancer. But they concluded that the FDA is ready to consider applications for new combination estrogen- progesterone pills, if only to encourage drug companies to develop more safety data about them.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Government Accountability Office has agreed to investigate why an electric device used in gynecological surgery was marketed for two decades before safety warnings were issued by the Food and Drug Administration. The GAO, which investigates how the government spends tax dollars, sent a confirmatory letter to U.S. Rep Mike Fitzpatrick (R, Pa). He and 11 other members of Congress requested the probe last month. "GAO accepts your request as work that is within the scope of its authority," said the Sept.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The husband of a Berks County woman who died of a rare uterine cancer following a minimally invasive hysterectomy is suing the maker of the device used in her surgery at Reading Hospital. The lawsuit, filed Friday in federal court in Philadelphia, adds to controversy over electric tissue-cutting "morcellators. " The devices let doctors remove tissue through tiny abdominal incisions, shortening patients' hospitalization and recovery. In rare cases, the process can disseminate an aggressive uterine cancer, leiomyosarcoma, that routine diagnostic tests usually miss.
NEWS
February 6, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: My 41-year-old daughter was diagnosed with breast cancer at an early stage. She opted for a bilateral mastectomy and chemotherapy. There was some lymph-node involvement. Her doctor is now trying to talk her into five years of Tamoxifen. I worry about the side effects like cataracts, stroke, aneurysm, and uterine cancer. Isn't a bilateral mastectomy followed by chemo enough? Answer: Research shows that using the anti-estrogen drug Tamoxifen in women who have had breast cancer reduces the chance that the breast cancer will return by up to 50 percent.
NEWS
June 9, 2005
Anne Bancroft played only a supporting role in one of the most delicious stories about her. It was Oscar night more than 40 years ago and Bancroft was up for Best Actress for her portrayal of Annie Sullivan in the film version of The Miracle Worker. Expecting to win was Bette Davis, whose costar in Whatever Happened to Baby Jane, Joan Crawford, was snubbed that year by the Academy Award nominators. Crawford had agreed to accept on behalf of Bancroft, who couldn't break away from a New York stage engagement.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A renowned Boston medical center was ordered by a judge Tuesday to stop imposing extraordinary security measures on a Bucks County cancer patient and her husband, who have been sharply critical of Brigham and Women's Hospital. The Massachusetts judge agreed with the couple, Amy Reed and Hooman Noorchashm, that the security was intended to intimidate them, and violated their right to free speech as well as the hospital's own policies. Hospital officials declined to comment. Reed, 42, an anesthesiologist at the University of Pennsylvania, and Noorchashm, 43, a cardiac surgeon at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, have led a highly effective national campaign to ban a gynecological surgical device that Brigham doctors used to perform her hysterectomy two years ago. The tissue-slicing device, an electric morcellator, spread her hidden uterine cancer - a danger that they have since publicized.
NEWS
September 7, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Government Accountability Office has agreed to investigate why an electric device used in gynecological surgery was marketed for two decades before safety warnings were issued by the Food and Drug Administration. The GAO, which investigates how the government spends tax dollars, sent a confirmatory letter to U.S. Rep. Mike Fitzpatrick (R., Pa.). He and 11 other members of Congress requested the probe last month. The tissue-slicing device, called a power morcellator, enables hysterectomies to be done through small abdominal incisions, but it can also spread and worsen undetected uterine cancer.
NEWS
August 9, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twelve members of Congress have asked the U.S. Government Accountability Office to investigate why an electric device used in gynecologic surgery was marketed for two decades before safety warnings were issued by the Food and Drug Administration. The tissue-dissecting device, called a power morcellator, enables hysterectomies to be done through small rather than large abdominal incisions, but it can also spread and worsen an undetected uterine cancer. After that horrible scenario befell anesthesiologist Amy Reed at a Boston hospital in late 2013, she and her husband, heart surgeon Hooman Noorchashm, launched a campaign to ban electric morcellators.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amy Reed, the doctor who has pushed for a ban on the gynecological surgery device that worsened her uterine cancer prognosis, said Wednesday that she is fighting a recurrence. Reed, 41, had about a year in apparent remission after her 2013 diagnosis and treatment for leiomyosarcoma, a rare and ferociously aggressive uterine cancer. Two weeks ago, she had surgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania to remove a small tumor that a scan revealed in the bony part of her spinal column.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The dangers of a power tool used in gynecological surgery have been debated for more than a year, with experts offering varying estimates of the chance that an undetected uterine cancer would be spread - and likely worsened - by the tissue-slicing device. Now, two new studies have waded into the controversy. Using a nationwide insurance claims database, Columbia University researchers looked at women treated for uterine growths called fibroids. Uterine cancer was discovered in one out of every 1,073 who underwent power morcellation, and one out of 528 without morcellation.
NEWS
May 22, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two doctors' groups are defending a tissue-cutting device that makes gynecological surgery less invasive but in rare cases spreads a hidden uterine cancer. Electric morcellators, introduced in 1993, are used to dissect the uterus or uterine fibroids so tissue can be removed through small abdominal incisions. They have come under scrutiny in recent months because the motorized blade can disseminate bits of undetected cancer. Many hospitals have halted their use; the Food and Drug Administration last month issued a safety advisory "discouraging" power morcellation; and Johnson & Johnson suspended worldwide sales of its version of the machine.
NEWS
April 1, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The husband-and-wife doctors who have turned their personal tragedy into a public health crusade are getting traction. Cardiothoracic surgeon Hooman Noorchashm and his wife, anesthesiologist Amy Reed, 40 - both trained in Philadelphia and affiliated with Harvard Medical School - want electric tissue-cutting morcellators banned from gynecologic surgery. Power morcellation, introduced in 1993, enables tissue removal through tiny abdominal incisions, but in rare cases it can also spread a hidden uterine cancer called leiomyosarcoma.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The husband of a Berks County woman who died of a rare uterine cancer following a minimally invasive hysterectomy is suing the maker of the device used in her surgery at Reading Hospital. The lawsuit, filed Friday in federal court in Philadelphia, adds to controversy over electric tissue-cutting "morcellators. " The devices let doctors remove tissue through tiny abdominal incisions, shortening patients' hospitalization and recovery. In rare cases, the process can disseminate an aggressive uterine cancer, leiomyosarcoma, that routine diagnostic tests usually miss.
NEWS
November 23, 2012 | By Mark Kennedy, Associated Press
NEW YORK - If you've ever fired up your computer and cringed in anticipation of what nasty e-mails await, pity Eve Ensler. The Tony Award-winning playwright and activist gets a daily record sent to her of atrocities against women - a never-ending drumbeat of rape, genital mutilation, imprisonment, and murder. "In my inbox on any given day, I can tell you every single story of any violation that's happening to women anywhere in the world," Ensler says. "It's horrifying. My inbox is like a nightmare.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|