CollectionsUterus
IN THE NEWS

Uterus

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 2, 1993 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A revolutionary new sterilization method is being used on tens of thousands of poor women in developing countries worldwide. But the irreversible procedure - placing a chemical irritant in the uterus - is raising fears among health experts who question its safety and its potential for social abuse. Many of those critics are gathering to discuss the method at a special meeting today in New York. The "quinacrine pellet" method, developed in the 1970s by a gynecologist in Chile, is simple to do and costs just pennies per application.
NEWS
May 22, 2016 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
When Kelly Hidleburg's confounding case of anemia was traced to heavy bleeding due to uterine fibroids, she faced the same tough choice that confronts thousands of American women every year. She could have her uterus or just the fibroids surgically removed, or she could try one of several newer procedures aimed at shrinking the usually benign but troublesome tumors. At 46, she could try waiting a few years to see whether menopause, with its natural decline in hormones, would solve the problem.
NEWS
May 15, 2016 | By Paul Forfia, For The Inquirer
A 49-year-old woman arrived at the Temple University Hospital emergency room complaining of difficulty breathing, light-headedness when walking, and worsening swelling in her legs. Her breathing was so labored that she had to be examined in a wheelchair. Her medical history included a prior stroke and a history of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) with pulmonary embolism (PE). Deep vein thrombosis occurs when a blood clot forms in one or multiple veins deep in the body, most commonly in the legs.
NEWS
September 12, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Sandra Cintron's mother heard how bad her daughter's fibroid symptoms were getting - bleeding that went on for weeks and debilitating pain - she thought she knew where things were heading. "You're going to need a hysterectomy," Maria Perales said. She had one herself when she was in her 30s. A lot has changed since then, though, and Cintron, of Northeast Philadelphia, was able to choose a less extreme treatment for the benign growths on her uterus. Last week, she had an embolization at Einstein Medical Center, a procedure that left her uterus intact but cut off the blood supply to the fibroids.
NEWS
June 20, 1989 | By Mack Reed, Special to The Inquirer
A surgical team testified yesterday that Joyce Lynch's uterus was removed with her consent in 1978, contradicting Lynch's earlier testimony that she thought she was pregnant during the slaying of a Hazlettville, Del., couple and the kidnapping of their 9-day-old son on Christmas Eve in 1987. Dr. Jae Park told jurors in Kent County Superior Court that he performed the hysterectomy. A nurse and a pathologist testified that they had personally handled and examined the uterus, fallopian tube and ovary that Park removed from Lynch.
NEWS
May 31, 2010 | By Alex Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
The worst surgical case of my residency came when we delivered my patient's baby by cesarean - her ninth cesarean birth. The baby came out fine, but for the mother we suspected one of most feared complications in obstetrics - that her placenta had burrowed deep into the muscle of the uterus. To get oxygen and nutrients to the fetus, the placenta needs to attach just a few millimeters deep into the uterus. We worried that hers had gone much farther and might eat through the entire thickness of the uterus, keeping it from shrinking back to its normal size after delivery and causing a massive hemorrhage.
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | By Edward Ohlbaum, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Pat Schwartz, 35, of Lower Makefield, suffered such severe menstrual cramps as a teenager that she had to be excused from her high school classes. Eleven years later, she learned that the cause of her chronic, debilitating pain was endometriosis, a puzzling and often misdiagnosed disease said to affect up to 15 percent of women during their child-bearing years, or an estimated 5 million women in the United States. To shed light on this mysterious ailment, the Bucks County Chapter of the Endometriosis Association - the Philadelphia-area chapter of a national support group - has organized a half-day conference on endometriosis on Feb. 29 at the Royce Hotel in Langhorne.
NEWS
March 13, 1989 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
A pregnant 15-year-old girl was shot twice early yesterday by a man who chased her down the street, then fired through the door of a house after she ran inside for cover, police said. Police said Kimyda Fisher, who is eight months pregnant, was struck by one bullet that entered her hip and lodged just in front of the wall of the uterus. The other bullet struck both legs. The fetus was unharmed. The girl's doctor told police that the bullet was stopped by the wall of the uterus, and that the pregnancy likely prevented more serious injury.
NEWS
January 21, 2011 | By JULIE SHAW, shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592
After ripping Dana Haynes' cervix, uterus and bowel during a botched abortion, Kermit Gosnell - the West Philadelphia doctor now charged with murder - kept her bleeding and writhing in pain for four hours without calling for help, city prosecutors contend. The doctor called an ambulance only after Haynes' cousins yelled to be let into his Women's Medical Society clinic and ordered him to do so. At the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, doctors found that most of the nearly 17-week fetus still remained in Haynes' uterus.
LIVING
May 24, 1987 | By Alice Urbanski, Special to The Inquirer
Ten years ago, Genevieve Carminati, a writer now in her mid-30s, underwent an emergency hysterectomy. Six months after her surgery, she plunged into a depression. "I began to feel weepy for no real reason. I found myself getting upset even when my day had gone fine," she recalls. "As soon as I got home from work, I'd slam the door shut and cry. "I fought a lot of emotional battles. I'm one of 12 children; childbirth had always been a cause of celebration in my family. I had always equated femaleness with motherhood.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 22, 2016 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
When Kelly Hidleburg's confounding case of anemia was traced to heavy bleeding due to uterine fibroids, she faced the same tough choice that confronts thousands of American women every year. She could have her uterus or just the fibroids surgically removed, or she could try one of several newer procedures aimed at shrinking the usually benign but troublesome tumors. At 46, she could try waiting a few years to see whether menopause, with its natural decline in hormones, would solve the problem.
NEWS
May 15, 2016 | By Paul Forfia, For The Inquirer
A 49-year-old woman arrived at the Temple University Hospital emergency room complaining of difficulty breathing, light-headedness when walking, and worsening swelling in her legs. Her breathing was so labored that she had to be examined in a wheelchair. Her medical history included a prior stroke and a history of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) with pulmonary embolism (PE). Deep vein thrombosis occurs when a blood clot forms in one or multiple veins deep in the body, most commonly in the legs.
NEWS
September 12, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Sandra Cintron's mother heard how bad her daughter's fibroid symptoms were getting - bleeding that went on for weeks and debilitating pain - she thought she knew where things were heading. "You're going to need a hysterectomy," Maria Perales said. She had one herself when she was in her 30s. A lot has changed since then, though, and Cintron, of Northeast Philadelphia, was able to choose a less extreme treatment for the benign growths on her uterus. Last week, she had an embolization at Einstein Medical Center, a procedure that left her uterus intact but cut off the blood supply to the fibroids.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Shawn Pogatchnik, Associated Press
DUBLIN, Ireland - A miscarrying woman who died in an Irish hospital should have had her blood poisoning detected much sooner and been offered an abortion to improve her odds of survival, an experts' report concluded Thursday in a case that is forcing Ireland to modernize its abortion laws. The 108-page report into the October death of Savita Halappanavar documented what the lead investigator described as "a cascade of mistakes" overshadowed by officials' refusal to remove the fetus until its heart stopped beating.
NEWS
September 19, 2012 | By Karl Ritter, Associated Press
STOCKHOLM, Sweden - Two Swedish women are hoping to get pregnant after undergoing what doctors are calling the world's first mother-to-daughter uterus transplants. Specialists at the University of Goteborg said they performed the surgery over the weekend without complications but added that they won't consider it successful unless the women give birth to healthy children. "That's the best proof," said Michael Olausson, one of the surgeons. One of the unidentified women had her uterus removed many years ago because of cervical cancer, while the other was born without a womb.
NEWS
January 21, 2011 | By JULIE SHAW, shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592
After ripping Dana Haynes' cervix, uterus and bowel during a botched abortion, Kermit Gosnell - the West Philadelphia doctor now charged with murder - kept her bleeding and writhing in pain for four hours without calling for help, city prosecutors contend. The doctor called an ambulance only after Haynes' cousins yelled to be let into his Women's Medical Society clinic and ordered him to do so. At the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, doctors found that most of the nearly 17-week fetus still remained in Haynes' uterus.
NEWS
May 31, 2010 | By Alex Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
The worst surgical case of my residency came when we delivered my patient's baby by cesarean - her ninth cesarean birth. The baby came out fine, but for the mother we suspected one of most feared complications in obstetrics - that her placenta had burrowed deep into the muscle of the uterus. To get oxygen and nutrients to the fetus, the placenta needs to attach just a few millimeters deep into the uterus. We worried that hers had gone much farther and might eat through the entire thickness of the uterus, keeping it from shrinking back to its normal size after delivery and causing a massive hemorrhage.
NEWS
February 2, 2000 | By Karen Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Five days after news got out that fertility drugs had helped a couple in Lakewood, Ocean County, conceive septuplets, an infection that spread to the woman's uterus caused all seven fetuses to abort spontaneously. Ivette Zapata-Smalls, 31, and her husband, Fred Smalls, 37, had hoped that by late March, wailing infants would help fill the silence left by the death of their 21-month-old daughter in 1998. Anisa died of rheumatoid arthritis. "It's very unfortunate," said Charles Hux, Zapata-Smalls' obstetrician, a specialist in high-risk births at the Jersey Shore Medical Center in Neptune, Monmouth County.
LIVING
March 24, 1997 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than a generation after American women began rebelling against routine hysterectomies, removal of the uterus remains a common and controversial surgery. While the number of hysterectomies in this country has declined from a peak of 740,000 in 1975, it is still high at about 560,000 each year - twice the rate in England and three times the rate in Sweden. The good news is that women's demand for less radical treatments - coupled with managed care's demand for less costly ones - is spurring development of alternatives to hysterectomy.
NEWS
January 28, 1995 | By Art Caplan
Six-week-old Jonathan Alan Austin had a fractured skull and internal injuries when he died Jan. 17 in the pediatric intensive care unit at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. His brief life story should make us all think harder about how babies are being made in America today. According to the Pennsylvania State Police, Alan's father is responsible for the infant's death. James Alan Austin of Hanover Township, Pa., told police that he had hit the baby on a number of occasions starting around Christmas.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|