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Uzbekistan

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NEWS
November 24, 1988 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
The hottest book in town these days is a barely veiled roman a clef about the Mafia's ties to government officials. It has everyone guessing who's who, even as real-life figures caught in the web of the scandal are being hauled off to jail. Just a couple of weeks ago, the author of the novel was riding in a taxi with his wife and son when it was rammed by another car. All three were hospitalized with serious injuries. Could it have been a Mafia hit? The local prosecutor says no, but that hasn't stopped the speculation.
NEWS
April 20, 2004 | By Mark McDonald INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Radical Islamist groups from Central Asia took heavy losses while fighting alongside the Taliban in Afghanistan, but the remnants of those mini-armies have proved remarkably resilient in recent months and now appear to be regrouping with new recruits, new strategies and old money, according to analysts and witnesses. No longer secure in Afghanistan, hundreds of Uzbek, Tajik and Chinese militants have recently returned to familiar sanctuaries back home. Analysts believe they are retrenching at their former camps and hideouts, mostly in the rugged and unpoliced mountains of Tajikistan.
NEWS
June 7, 1989 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Communist Party chief of the Central Asian republic of Uzbekistan said yesterday that about 50 people were killed and hundreds more injured last weekend during ethnic clashes between Uzbeks and a Turkic minority. The disclosure by Rafik N. Nishanov marked the first official confirmation of large-scale bloodshed in the mostly Islamic republic - the fifth Soviet republic to see ethnic violence in the last three years. The Soviet television news program Vremya put the death toll at 100. Nishanov denounced what he called the "vandalism of Uzbek youth," some of whom he said had been armed with axes.
NEWS
March 13, 2002 | By Ron Hutcheson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Bush calls the war on terrorism a struggle between good and evil, but the battle lines are not always so clearly defined when it comes to U.S. allies. The contradictions were on full display yesterday, when Bush welcomed President Islam Karimov of Uzbekistan to the Oval Office in a show of wartime solidarity. Although Karimov has found common cause with the United States on terrorism, his own human-rights record is appalling, authorities say. According to the State Department, Karimov oversees a totalitarian state where security forces routinely torture prisoners with suffocation, electric shock, rape and beatings.
SPORTS
February 25, 1994 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some day soon, everyone here agrees, all the women will be doing triple flips in aerials competition. They'll scoot down the hill just like Lina Tcherjazova. They'll catapult into the air just like Lina Tcherjazova. And they'll tumble and gyrate and land just like Lina Tcherjazova. This is how sports evolve. Roger Bannister runs the four-minute mile and then it is possible. Bob Beamon leaps 29 feet and the number is out there to chase. Tonya Harding becomes the first woman to land a triple axel in competition and more follow.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2012 | By Beth D'Addono, For the Daily News
WHEN I travel, I go to supermarkets. Unlike most touring shoppers, I never pause at store windows displaying jewelry and haute couture. But whether I'm in Aix or Antwerp New Orleans or Naples, I make a beeline for the local grocery store to peruse aisles of preserves, inhale the scent of coffee and pick up toothpaste sporting foreign labels. More than one pal at home has benefited from my wanderings, gifted with a tub of New Zealand clover honey or a pound of chicory-laced coffee from Rouses on Royal Street.
NEWS
September 28, 2001
Afghanistan, Pakistan and Uzbekistan have at least one thing in common. They all end with the suffix -istan. What does it mean? Istan is a Persian word that means "land. " Seven countries in the world end with -istan or -stan: Afghanistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Pakistan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. Similarly, in English, many countries end with the suffix -land (England, Finland, Greenland, Iceland and Ireland, for example). Afghanistan means "land of the Afghans," Uzbekistan means "land of the Uzbeks" and Pakistan means "land of the pure.
NEWS
September 18, 2011 | By Peter Leonard, Associated Press
MOSCOW - Glamour queen. International diplomat. Plunderer of the poor. Gulnara Karimova has been called all these things. But all that the eldest daughter of Uzbekistan's aging authoritarian leader appears to want is for people to like her. By the looks of things, that isn't quite working out. Producers of New York's Fashion Week canceled a show by Karimova amid pressure from a human-rights group and a planned protest over the use of...
NEWS
January 27, 2012 | By Maran Turner
This month, Akzam Turgunov, an Uzbek human rights advocate, spent his 60th birthday in a prison work camp. Just before his birthday, the Obama administration moved to weaken U.S. sanctions against Uzbekistan that have been in place since 2004 due to its abhorrent human rights practices. Turgunov's imprisonment, recently declared a violation of international law by the United Nations, stands as one example of those practices. Turgunov's record as a political and human rights activist is well established.
NEWS
March 16, 2012 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, Daily News Staff Writer
A PHILADELPHIA man was arrested yesterday by the Philadelphia FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force for helping to fund the Islamic Jihad Union, the Justice Department said. Charges against Bakhtiyor Jumaev, 45, of Port Richmond, were filed by the U.S. attorney in Colorado, which is handling the case. The IJU is a terrorist organization that splintered from the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan in the early 2000s. It has conducted attacks and bombings in Uzbekistan and against coalition forces in Afghanistan and has attempted attacks in Germany.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2012 | By Beth D'Addono, For the Daily News
WHEN I travel, I go to supermarkets. Unlike most touring shoppers, I never pause at store windows displaying jewelry and haute couture. But whether I'm in Aix or Antwerp New Orleans or Naples, I make a beeline for the local grocery store to peruse aisles of preserves, inhale the scent of coffee and pick up toothpaste sporting foreign labels. More than one pal at home has benefited from my wanderings, gifted with a tub of New Zealand clover honey or a pound of chicory-laced coffee from Rouses on Royal Street.
NEWS
March 16, 2012 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, Daily News Staff Writer
A PHILADELPHIA man was arrested yesterday by the Philadelphia FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force for helping to fund the Islamic Jihad Union, the Justice Department said. Charges against Bakhtiyor Jumaev, 45, of Port Richmond, were filed by the U.S. attorney in Colorado, which is handling the case. The IJU is a terrorist organization that splintered from the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan in the early 2000s. It has conducted attacks and bombings in Uzbekistan and against coalition forces in Afghanistan and has attempted attacks in Germany.
NEWS
March 15, 2012 | By Michael Hinkelman
A Philadelphia man was arrested this morning by the Philadelphia FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force, the Justice Department said. Bakhtiyor Jumaev, 45, of Port Richmond, was charged with helping to fund the Islamic Jihad Union. Charges were filed in Colorado by the U.S. Attorney, which is handling the case. The IJU is a terrorist organization which splintered from the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan in the early 2000s. It has conducted attacks and bombings in Uzbekistan and against Coalition forces in Afghanistan and attempted attacks in Germany.
NEWS
January 27, 2012 | By Maran Turner
This month, Akzam Turgunov, an Uzbek human rights advocate, spent his 60th birthday in a prison work camp. Just before his birthday, the Obama administration moved to weaken U.S. sanctions against Uzbekistan that have been in place since 2004 due to its abhorrent human rights practices. Turgunov's imprisonment, recently declared a violation of international law by the United Nations, stands as one example of those practices. Turgunov's record as a political and human rights activist is well established.
NEWS
September 18, 2011 | By Peter Leonard, Associated Press
MOSCOW - Glamour queen. International diplomat. Plunderer of the poor. Gulnara Karimova has been called all these things. But all that the eldest daughter of Uzbekistan's aging authoritarian leader appears to want is for people to like her. By the looks of things, that isn't quite working out. Producers of New York's Fashion Week canceled a show by Karimova amid pressure from a human-rights group and a planned protest over the use of...
NEWS
August 9, 2011 | By Michael Hinkelman, DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia man who was arrested a week ago for allegedly threatening U.S. Senator Joseph Lieberman (I-CT) was released on bail Tuesday afternoon. Dmitri Dyatlov's computer will be monitored electronically and he can't leave his apartment. He will remain in custody until authorities set up the monitoring system. An FBI arrest affidavit filed in federal magistrate court on August 3 said that Dyatlov, 23, an information technology consultant, posted a blog threat to "shoot (Lieberman)
NEWS
January 1, 2011 | By Nathan Gorenstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everyone agrees that Ismoil Samadov and Bekhzod Bakhityarovich Yusupov, two Muslims from Uzbekistan, arrived in the United States in 1999, overstayed their student visas, and are subject to deportation. And there is no question that when the FBI raided the Philadelphia rowhouse Samadov and Yusupov shared with other immigrants in 2002, they found a computer that contained a map of Pennsylvania State Police barracks and jihadi videos downloaded from the Web, including one of a speech by Osama bin Laden.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2008 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The power to voyage to an exotic land - without ever actually leaving Philadelphia - is one of the best tricks an eating city can offer. One moment I'm driving up I-95 to Woodhaven Road, weaving my way through the rainy Northeast toward Bustleton Avenue. The next moment, I'm in the parking lot of Uzbekistan (the restaurant), dreamily approaching the front door on a heavenly cloud of charcoal-roasted lamb smoke, puffing in my direction from the kitchen chimney. There was an Italian place here not long ago, but it feels more like Moscow or Tashkent now as I part the stylishly dressed crowds of Russian-speaking smokers gathered outdoors.
NEWS
April 27, 2004 | By Mark McDonald INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Security officials have responded to recent bombings in Uzbekistan with a harsh campaign of mass arrests and torture, according to opposition politicians and human-rights activists here. Hundreds reportedly have been arrested or detained without being charged. Some say they have suffered severe beatings, electric shocks, and anal rape with bottles. "There's a trail of evidence here that's simply undeniable," said Allison Gill, the head of the Human Rights Watch office in Tashkent.
NEWS
April 20, 2004 | By Mark McDonald INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Radical Islamist groups from Central Asia took heavy losses while fighting alongside the Taliban in Afghanistan, but the remnants of those mini-armies have proved remarkably resilient in recent months and now appear to be regrouping with new recruits, new strategies and old money, according to analysts and witnesses. No longer secure in Afghanistan, hundreds of Uzbek, Tajik and Chinese militants have recently returned to familiar sanctuaries back home. Analysts believe they are retrenching at their former camps and hideouts, mostly in the rugged and unpoliced mountains of Tajikistan.
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