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Vacant Lot

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NEWS
July 27, 2008 | By Bernard Samuel Brown
One of my favorite places in Philadelphia was bulldozed last year, and with it several hundred of my favorite snakes. Last week, as I have every couple of months, I returned to the cul-de-sac in the West Side Industrial Park to survey the changes. This time I found a nearly-completed anonymous office building, a large parking lot, and a retention pond. Before the current construction the land had been vacant, once a railyard but for decades a weedy, trash-strewn field held by the railroad and then the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corporation (PIDC)
NEWS
November 14, 1992 | by Joe O'Dowd, Daily News Staff Writer
The severed body parts of an Oxford Circle man were discovered yesterday in sections of Kensington and Port Richmond, police said. The grisly scene began playing itself out about 8 a.m., when green trash bags containing the victim's torso, arms and head were found in a vacant lot on Delaware Avenue near Lewis Street in Port Richmond, police said. That discovery was made by a scrap picker who frequently searches the area. The victim's lower torso and both legs were found about 8 p.m. in the trunk of a burning car at Rosehill and Clearfield streets in Kensington.
NEWS
June 15, 1988 | By Craig S. Palosky, Special to The Inquirer
A group of Riverton residents have redirected their interest in foreign policy toward local issues, such as the future of the vacant lot at Broad and Main Streets, which they discussed at a public gathering Friday. The Small Decisions Discussion Group scheduled the public discussion to address development proposals for the 1.33-acre lot, including a current plan to build 20 Victorian-style townhouses that will be presented informally to zoning board members tomorrow. The weed-covered lot, located near the town's commercial center between Freddy's Shoe Service and Riverton's war memorial, is currently divided into three lots, two of which are zoned for commercial use; the third is zoned for residential use. According to Small Decisions organizer Berl Gusky, Friday's meeting at the Riverton library, which attracted 25 residents, was designed to recreate the "old-fashioned town meetings" of New England's past.
NEWS
October 4, 1987 | By John Hall, Special to The Inquirer
A plan to build a house on a vacant lot in Hatboro was opposed last week by neighbors, who greeted the builder's proposal with skepticism, derision and laughter. Henry P. Jacquelin, a Willow Grove real estate agent and builder, has asked the Hatboro Zoning Board for a variance to build on the empty lot at 101 Crooked Billet Rd. The property is 20 feet short of the zoning code's requirement of a 70-foot frontage. Scot W. Semisch, an attorney representing Jacquelin, said the zoning code's requirements created a hardship that would ban construction on the site.
NEWS
May 22, 1986 | By Michael B. Coakley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tests will be conducted to determine the contents of about 100 small laboratory bottles that were dumped on a vacant lot in North Philadelphia and whether the materials pose any health hazards, city health officials said yesterday. Officials of the University of Pennsylvania, where at least some of the vials apparently originated, said yesterday that to the best of their knowledge the vials contain animal blood serum and pose no hazards. The vials were among a cache of discarded laboratory materials that was illegally dumped Monday afternoon on a vacant lot in the 2000 block of North College Avenue, near the north wall of Girard College.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | By Sara M. Lomax, Special to The Inquirer
Residents of the Mount Pleasant section of Tredyffrin have mixed feelings about the township's proposal to transform a 2.3-acre vacant lot behind the First Baptist Church on Upper Gulph Road into a public park. The township's Park Commission has proposed putting in a tot lot, basketball courts and picnic facilities but must first get the approval of the Mount Pleasant community, as the property is deeded to its citizens. Some in the community insist this is just the latest effort by the township to seize the property.
NEWS
August 4, 1988 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Surrounded by a thicket of brick rowhouses and clapboard twins, peeling paint and crumpled sidewalks, a giant lot in East Frankford has lain vacant for more than two years now. The block-long site, where a dental plate factory once stood, is accessible from three sides. It could be a perfect dumping ground, a magnet for unwanted trash in this, what has been called one of America's dirtiest cities. Yet, against great odds, it remains litter-free. Aside from a few weeds that have grown through the brick foundation and a couple of wadded sheets of paper skipping across the surface like tumbleweed, the place looked one day this week as if it had just been vacuumed.
NEWS
July 22, 1989 | By Petria May, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lime-green couch with its jaundiced belly of foam oozing through rust- caked springs. Strewn glass and potato-chip bags. Weed-trees and worn tires. In addition, more than 200 containers filled with trash also were collected from just one vacant lot in the 2300 block of North 10th Street by 10 youths equipped with gloves, goggles and protective helmets. The bags and bulk items were then stuffed into a city trash truck. The city has thousands of lots like this one - about 15,000, in fact - according to the Department of Licenses and Inspections.
NEWS
June 5, 1988 | By Frank Lewis, Special to The Inquirer
Woodlynne Councilman Mike Sangarlo wore a baseball cap that read: "This is my lay-around-do-nothing cap. " But laziness was hardly the reason for his visit to an overgrown lot in the 700 block of Woodlynne Avenue on a recent Saturday. "We're out here because we care about our community," he said. Sangarlo was among a group of township officials and concerned citizens who, after several months of planning, spent the better part of May 28 cleaning a plot of land on Woodlynne Avenue, at the border between Woodlynne and Collingswood.
NEWS
January 29, 2007 | By Keith Forrest
Empty lots are fast dwindling from the American landscape. There were several where I was growing up in Cape May. They were wonderful places because we could infuse them with our imaginations. They were the stuff of our tall tales. The last empty space in Collingswood has been inundated with heavy construction equipment, and I don't have the heart to tell my sons, 5-year-old Kameron and 3-year-old Josh. At the end of our block, where Bryant Avenue hits Haddon Avenue, an office building is going up. I have been trying to divert my sons' attention whenever we walk by it. The lot had been the domicile of one of my sons' favorite yarns.
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NEWS
August 29, 2014
WHEN ADAM Lang got a bill in July from the Water Revenue Bureau, it hit him like an ALS bucket of ice. Part of the jolt was the amount - $760.60 due on a property he bought at a Philadelphia Housing Authority auction in April 2012. The bill jumped to $943.62 in August. The biggest shock was the address. The bill was for water used at 2047 Master St., an empty lot. There is no building on it now and there was no building on it when he bought it. A computer network engineer, Lang also bought a house at 2129 Master St. at the same time, both as investments.
NEWS
December 16, 2013 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
CODE OFFICERS looking to rid nuisance conditions in locked-up, vacant lots around town just might get a pair of shears to gain access, if a bill becomes law by the end of January. Legislation passed in City Council on Thursday would allow workers in city's Community Life Improvement Programs, or CLIP, to clip the locks on vacant and abandoned fenced-in lots whose owners are either lost, unknown or unresponsive. The ordinance, sponsored by Councilman Kenyatta Johnson, gives greater power to CLIP, which works to improve the appearance of neighborhoods and eradicate blight.
NEWS
October 26, 2013
Bliss not Christie's Contrary to popular opinion, Gov. Christie is not to be congratulated for dropping his challenge to state Superior Court Judge Mary Jacobson's declaration of marriage equality ("Across New Jersey, making it official," Oct. 22). It was Christie, in the first place, who had a tantrum when rebuked by the courts, and immediately said he was going to drag his losing issue all the way to the state Supreme Court, wasting even more taxpayer dollars. Even after conceding defeat, Christie still mumbled his sour grapes about how marriage equality ought to have been settled by a voter referendum.
NEWS
September 11, 2013 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
THE MOMENT Mayor Nutter got to their neighborhood for a ceremony to open a new basketball court, the women of North Sydenham Street began plotting to get him on their block. They dutifully attended the festivities Friday at nearby Heritage Park. They enthusiastically applauded the state-of-the-art court donated by Beyond Sports and ESPN. They nodded when organizers and residents noted what a boost such a gift would be for a neighborhood that just months ago was begging the city to replace a basketball hoop inside the park.
NEWS
March 9, 2013 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was not much more than 12 hours after neighbors lost the fight to preserve the 130-year-old Bunting House at Roxborough and Ridge Avenues that the gracious, flat-topped stone landmark with maroon trim began to come down. By day's end, it was a pile of rubble. Three months later and still mourning the building's loss, neighbors are fending off a battle on a new front: what will replace it? Will it be a drive-through Wendy's, as rumored? And is the home of the Baconator really a worst-case scenario?
NEWS
December 31, 2012
Police on Saturday found the body of a man who had been shot in the lower back in a vacant lot on the 5400 block of Akron Street in Philadelphia's Frankford section. A neighbor of the lot reported the body about 8:30 a.m. Saturday. Police found the man, about 30 years old, wrapped in a brown comforter and lying face down in the dirt. No other information was available, a police spokeswoman said. - Walter F. Naedele
NEWS
December 31, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia police found the body of a man, shot in the lower back, in a rear driveway of a vacant lot on the 5400 block of Akron Street in Frankford, a police spokeswoman said. After a neighbor of the lot called 911 to report the presence of the body at about 8:30 a.m. Saturday, police found the man, about 30 years old, wrapped in a brown comforter and lying face down in the dirt. No other information was available, the spokeswoman stated.    
NEWS
October 2, 2012
When city officials told a South Philadelphia businessman that he had to put back the ugly Jersey barriers he'd removed in cleaning a trash-strewn, city-owned vacant lot in the neighborhood, it's no wonder the confrontation went viral. After all, the city's directive - along with a threat of legal action - was taken to mean that real estate developer Ori Feibush also should return the estimated 40 tons of trash that his crews carted off the corner property near his coffee shop in the city's Point Breeze section.
NEWS
September 23, 2012 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
City officials said Friday that a formerly trash-strewn, city-owned vacant lot in Point Breeze that was cleaned and landscaped by a neighboring businessman can stay as it is. That is, until the city sells it. Edward Covington, executive director of the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority, spoke to reporters at the lot in the 1100 block of South 20th Street to address what has been a growing controversy for the city. Covington said that four parties - including the businessman who cleaned the lot, real estate developer Ori Feibush - have expressed interest in buying the lot. The authority will take steps in the coming weeks to sell it, Covington said.
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