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NEWS
August 24, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are a lot of things Sean Hartmann likes about his job as a tree trimmer. It pays well, and the roadsides where he works are often beautiful, especially in the spring and fall. But he definitely does not love poison ivy. It's everywhere. Hairy vines the size of his forearm climb the trees he must cut. Even if he can manage not to touch it, it winds up on the chain saw and in the wood chipper. Fragments fly all around him. Until this year, the result was constantly blistered, oozing skin.
NEWS
August 23, 1989 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
State agriculture officials are urging South Jersey residents to get proper vaccine shots for their horses because of an illness that took the life of a horse in Waterford Township last week. The 1-year-old filly, which officials refused to identify to protect its owners, died from equine encephalitis, a disease that predominantly strikes horses and pheasants. The disease is contracted through mosquitoes that have preyed on wild, infected birds. No cases of the illness were reported in New Jersey last year, but the state - especially the southern end - has historically been hit hard by it. A few years ago, 26 horses in the state died of equine encephalitis.
NEWS
April 4, 1986 | By James McGregor, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A science watchdog group yesterday accused the Agriculture Department of licensing a new pig vaccine without sufficient testing of whether it could infect humans with an untreatable animal disease known as the "mad itch" that can kill within 48 hours of infection. The vaccine, which is the first genetically engineered vaccine to be licensed for commercial sale, was extensively tested last year in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan. It is being marketed in those three states and in Indiana, Nebraska and Iowa.
NEWS
July 30, 1986 | By Donald C. Drake, Inquirer Staff Writer
The American scientists most likely to develop a vaccine against AIDS were summoned to the National Institutes of Health this week to assess their progress and report on what still has to be done. Seated around a huge conference table and on tiered seats bordering it on three sides, 150 of the nation's brightest scientists exchanged data, challenged each other's theories and proposed tactics that might help stop the epidemic of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, which has struck more than 23,000 Americans, killing half of them.
NEWS
April 1, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert Austrian, 90, a maverick researcher who ignored the hubris of the medical community after the discovery of penicillin and developed a vaccine for a bacterium that kills many pneumonia victims, died of a stroke last Sunday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Austrian, a world-renowned researcher of infectious disease and a Penn professor since 1962, lived in Center City. "Antibiotics do not always destroy pneumococcal bacterium in the elderly and victims with compromised immune systems," said John Cohn, an allergy and pulmonary specialist at Thomas Jefferson University.
NEWS
June 26, 1991 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
A Merck & Co. lab technician who stored $21,024 worth of stolen hepatitis B vaccine from the West Point, Montgomery County, pharmaceutical company in her refrigerator pleaded guilty yesterday to 10 counts of receiving stolen property, but did not explain why she had the vaccine. Catherine Brennan's daughter, Aileen Brennan, 22, who also works at Merck, told company security guards about the vaccine. She told police before her mother's Oct. 16 arrest that her mother was mistakenly vaccinating the family against the AIDS virus and sending the vaccine to the poor in Haiti.
NEWS
June 23, 2011
The Tri-State Animal Emergency Center in Woolwich Township, Gloucestor County, will hold an emergency parvovirus vaccine clinic for dog owners on Saturday, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. "Parvovirus is a very scary disease because it strikes quickly and is often fatal," said Dr. Mark Magazu, medical director at the South Jersey center. "We're seeing a dramatic increase this year in incidents of parvo in our area, and as a community of pet owners we really have got to control this thing. It's a miserable disease that causes affected dogs to suffer horribly.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
Nuron Biotech Inc., a specialty biologies and vaccines company based in Exton, said it acquired from Pfizer Inc., the vaccine Meningitec, used for the prevention of a potentially deadly infection caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C. There are an estimated 500,000 cases of the infection annually worldwide, according to Nuron Biotech, but the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated the rate of infection in the U.S. is...
NEWS
August 1, 1989 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau The Associated Press contributed to this article
The New Jersey Supreme Court yesterday refused to allow the parents of a brain-damaged teenager to sue all of the makers of a vaccine she was given, because the parents did not know which company manufactured the one she took. The justices rejected a theory argued by the parents that each manufacturer should bear responsibility based on its market share of the drug, a vaccine to combat whooping cough. The drug companies argued that their increased liability in this case and others would reduce research and that fewer companies would market the drug.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia neurologist has invented a vaccine aimed at preventing brain damage from stroke. Matthew During of Thomas Jefferson University and a team of scientists report in today's issue of Science that when they gave the vaccine to rats and then induced a stroke, it appeared to reduce the death of brain tissue by about 70 percent. The vaccine is not designed to prevent strokes but is meant to protect the brain against some of the permanent damage that often leaves people paralyzed or impaired in their speech or memory.
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NEWS
August 24, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are a lot of things Sean Hartmann likes about his job as a tree trimmer. It pays well, and the roadsides where he works are often beautiful, especially in the spring and fall. But he definitely does not love poison ivy. It's everywhere. Hairy vines the size of his forearm climb the trees he must cut. Even if he can manage not to touch it, it winds up on the chain saw and in the wood chipper. Fragments fly all around him. Until this year, the result was constantly blistered, oozing skin.
NEWS
August 17, 2015 | By Sheena Faherty, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tiffany Weber recently went through the kind of experience parents dread: Rushing a sick toddler to the hospital - twice - with a common yet frightening respiratory virus. Weber's son is now fine and has been joined by a new sibling. Chances are the baby might have a similar experience as big brother, because respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, is so common nearly every child gets it by age 2. Yet, told of a new vaccine being tested on pregnant women to protect their babies from RSV, the Huntingdon Valley marketing manager hesitated.
NEWS
August 16, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
In February, the country was stunned by a measles outbreak in California that highlighted how many adults and children were not immunized. Since then, the Pennsylvania Department of Health has redoubled efforts to improve the state's immunization rates. Now, as another school year is about to begin, Physician General Rachel Levine is pushing to end Pennsylvania's eight-month grace period, which is far longer than that of most other states. It has meant that kids can be in kindergarten almost an entire academic year without getting required immunizations.
NEWS
August 14, 2015
ISSUE | HEALTH Good school start means a little pinch With the start of school just around the corner, the state Health and Education Departments are deeply concerned that not all children in Pennsylvania will be fully vaccinated before class starts. In order to increase the number of children who start school properly vaccinated, we are launching a statewide education and awareness campaign: "Don't Wait. Vaccinate" (health.pa.gov). To help ensure all children are immunized regardless of their family income, we have scheduled free or low-cost vaccination health clinics across the state between now and Aug. 21. |Karen Murphy, secretary of health, and Pedro Rivera, secretary of health, Harrisburg ISSUE | WHITE HOUSE RUN Hold his breath?
NEWS
August 13, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Planned Parenthood is under attack by antiabortion activists over secretly recorded videos showing its executives candidly talking about supplying fetal tissue for medical research. This abortion-related controversy is providing grist for the many Republican presidential candidates hitting the trail. But it is also reviving public interest in fetal tissue research, which has yielded advances that have saved the lives of countless babies. Consider rubella. During a U.S. epidemic in the mid-1960s, an estimated 31,000 pregnant women infected with the virus suffered stillbirths, gave birth to severely disabled infants, or decided to end their pregnancies.
NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Wolf signed into law Friday a bill expanding access to flu vaccine by allowing children as young as 9 to be immunized at a local pharmacy. The action eliminated a Pennsylvania stipulation that only physicians could administer flu vaccines to school-age children, and granted thousands of pharmacists across the state that same ability. The intention of the bill, sponsored by Rep. Seth Grove (R., York), is to boost vaccination rates - and curb incidents of the flu - by expanding availability and convenience to families who may be unable to find time to visit a doctor, Grove said.
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Sheena Faherty, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite the sweltering heat, some researchers are still preoccupied by cold and flu season, especially Scott Hensley of the Wistar Institute, who hopes vaccines being developed for the 2015-16 flu season will provide more protection than last year's versions. Last year's shots were only 19 percent effective in preventing medical visits due to flu-related complications, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Until now, researchers did not know why. Hensley's group identified a hot spot on the flu virus where mutations in the virus' genome occurred last year.
NEWS
May 17, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Public-health experts cheered last month when a pivotal study showed GlaxoSmithKline's experimental shingles vaccine is much more effective than the established Merck vaccine. In the long run, the prospect of a better shingles shot could improve vaccination rates among people 60 and older, currently a disappointing 24 percent. But in the short run, the good news creates a bit of a quandary: Should older adults who want protection wait, probably a few years, for approval of the new vaccine, and hope the herpes zoster virus doesn't rear its excruciating rash in the meantime?
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | BY ADAM ZAKHEIM
A MEASLES outbreak among more than 100 children has turned political, and apparently so has hand-washing. Earlier this month, repeating the conservative trope of an over-regulated America, Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C., told a bipartisan group in our nation's capital that "restaurants should be allowed to opt out of certain regulations, like making employees wash their hands after going to the toilet. " This misguided belief in the primacy of individual liberty over the larger benefits of society often transcends political parties.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
During his recent trip to London, Gov. Christie provoked what the British call a row by winking at antivaccine know-nothingism even as measles cases surged back in the former colonies. Despite the governor's worst efforts, though, New Jersey has solid vaccination rules and impressive rates of child immunization. For evidence of the depredations of the nonsense the governor so ably articulated in Old Blighty, one has to look to the other side of the Delaware. In Pennsylvania, the measles vaccination rate among kindergartners last school year was worse than that of every other state save Colorado, according to a review by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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