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Vaccine

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NEWS
August 23, 1989 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
State agriculture officials are urging South Jersey residents to get proper vaccine shots for their horses because of an illness that took the life of a horse in Waterford Township last week. The 1-year-old filly, which officials refused to identify to protect its owners, died from equine encephalitis, a disease that predominantly strikes horses and pheasants. The disease is contracted through mosquitoes that have preyed on wild, infected birds. No cases of the illness were reported in New Jersey last year, but the state - especially the southern end - has historically been hit hard by it. A few years ago, 26 horses in the state died of equine encephalitis.
NEWS
April 4, 1986 | By James McGregor, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A science watchdog group yesterday accused the Agriculture Department of licensing a new pig vaccine without sufficient testing of whether it could infect humans with an untreatable animal disease known as the "mad itch" that can kill within 48 hours of infection. The vaccine, which is the first genetically engineered vaccine to be licensed for commercial sale, was extensively tested last year in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan. It is being marketed in those three states and in Indiana, Nebraska and Iowa.
NEWS
July 30, 1986 | By Donald C. Drake, Inquirer Staff Writer
The American scientists most likely to develop a vaccine against AIDS were summoned to the National Institutes of Health this week to assess their progress and report on what still has to be done. Seated around a huge conference table and on tiered seats bordering it on three sides, 150 of the nation's brightest scientists exchanged data, challenged each other's theories and proposed tactics that might help stop the epidemic of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, which has struck more than 23,000 Americans, killing half of them.
NEWS
April 1, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert Austrian, 90, a maverick researcher who ignored the hubris of the medical community after the discovery of penicillin and developed a vaccine for a bacterium that kills many pneumonia victims, died of a stroke last Sunday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Austrian, a world-renowned researcher of infectious disease and a Penn professor since 1962, lived in Center City. "Antibiotics do not always destroy pneumococcal bacterium in the elderly and victims with compromised immune systems," said John Cohn, an allergy and pulmonary specialist at Thomas Jefferson University.
NEWS
June 26, 1991 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
A Merck & Co. lab technician who stored $21,024 worth of stolen hepatitis B vaccine from the West Point, Montgomery County, pharmaceutical company in her refrigerator pleaded guilty yesterday to 10 counts of receiving stolen property, but did not explain why she had the vaccine. Catherine Brennan's daughter, Aileen Brennan, 22, who also works at Merck, told company security guards about the vaccine. She told police before her mother's Oct. 16 arrest that her mother was mistakenly vaccinating the family against the AIDS virus and sending the vaccine to the poor in Haiti.
NEWS
June 23, 2011
The Tri-State Animal Emergency Center in Woolwich Township, Gloucestor County, will hold an emergency parvovirus vaccine clinic for dog owners on Saturday, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. "Parvovirus is a very scary disease because it strikes quickly and is often fatal," said Dr. Mark Magazu, medical director at the South Jersey center. "We're seeing a dramatic increase this year in incidents of parvo in our area, and as a community of pet owners we really have got to control this thing. It's a miserable disease that causes affected dogs to suffer horribly.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
Nuron Biotech Inc., a specialty biologies and vaccines company based in Exton, said it acquired from Pfizer Inc., the vaccine Meningitec, used for the prevention of a potentially deadly infection caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C. There are an estimated 500,000 cases of the infection annually worldwide, according to Nuron Biotech, but the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated the rate of infection in the U.S. is...
NEWS
August 1, 1989 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau The Associated Press contributed to this article
The New Jersey Supreme Court yesterday refused to allow the parents of a brain-damaged teenager to sue all of the makers of a vaccine she was given, because the parents did not know which company manufactured the one she took. The justices rejected a theory argued by the parents that each manufacturer should bear responsibility based on its market share of the drug, a vaccine to combat whooping cough. The drug companies argued that their increased liability in this case and others would reduce research and that fewer companies would market the drug.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia neurologist has invented a vaccine aimed at preventing brain damage from stroke. Matthew During of Thomas Jefferson University and a team of scientists report in today's issue of Science that when they gave the vaccine to rats and then induced a stroke, it appeared to reduce the death of brain tissue by about 70 percent. The vaccine is not designed to prevent strokes but is meant to protect the brain against some of the permanent damage that often leaves people paralyzed or impaired in their speech or memory.
NEWS
July 6, 2002 | By James M. O'Neill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
College students living in Pennsylvania dorm rooms must be vaccinated against meningitis this fall or sign a waiver indicating they have read about the vaccine's availability and declined immunization. The new law, signed by Gov. Schweiker last week, mirrors similar rules already in place in New Jersey and other states. State Sen. Don White (R., Indiana) introduced the bill after several meningitis cases cropped up among college students last year, including one that caused the death of La Salle University freshman Kerri Bessette.
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NEWS
September 15, 2016
ISSUE | VACCINATIONS Give shots to kids As a pediatrician, I recently was directed to avoid educating patients about vaccines ("Giving a nudge to inoculate," Sunday). "Parents are going to do what they want," my supervising physician said. "Just work with the maximum they'd be willing to do. " I was baffled. Modern medicine has been successful in making vaccines safer over the decades and continues to rid the world of certain diseases. I am grateful most families have not seen the debilitating effects of diseases such as polio.
NEWS
September 11, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Many people don't remember the time before vaccines. The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia describes it as a world when parents kept their children out of public swimming pools to prevent polio and held "chicken pox parties," in hopes their children would get milder cases when they were young. Vaccines have made history of many diseases, but challenges remain. This year, the National Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices has recommended not using the live nasal spray influenza vaccine for the 2016-2017 flu season.
NEWS
September 8, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
ISSUE | VACCINATIONS Parents, beware The American Academy of Pediatrics issued a policy statement last week counseling its members to reject nonmedical waivers by parents wishing to forego their child's vaccinations ("Pediatricians group: Doctors can fire patients over vaccines," Tuesday, Aug. 30). Such vaccine refusers would be subject to dismissal from a pediatrician's practice. Before bowing to this pressure and agreeing to the dozen-or-so vaccines administered to children before age 15 months (some being combination vaccines)
NEWS
September 6, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Bradley Dyer and his colleagues at All Star Pediatrics in Exton refuse to care for refusers. "If you should absolutely refuse to vaccinate your child despite all our efforts, we will ask you to find another health-care provider," reads the policy given to parents. "Please recognize that by not vaccinating, you are putting your child at unnecessary risk for life-threatening illness and disability, and even death. " Esther K. Chung's group, meanwhile, never gives up on refusers.
BUSINESS
August 31, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Inovio Pharmaceuticals in Plymouth Meeting said Monday that it has begun a clinical study of its experimental Zika vaccine in 160 healthy adult volunteers in Puerto Rico, where the virus outbreak has been declared a public health emergency. Inovio shares closed up 4.63 percent, or 41 cents, to $9.27, on the news. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has estimated that Zika will infect more than 25 percent of the Puerto Rican population by the end of the year, Inovio said.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
Inovio Pharmaceuticals In Plymouth Meeting said Wednesday that it will continue to develop its hepatitis B immunotherapy independently, after Roche notified the company it was ending the collaboration for drug candidate, INO-1800. Roche notified Inovio on July 28 that it was returning the treatment for chronic hepatitis B infection that Roche had licensed in 2013. Inovio said in a statement that it will continue with a Phase 1 study, and will enroll patients as planned at 30 clinical sites in the United States and Asia, with study results expected in the second half of next year.
NEWS
July 28, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
The first volunteer has received a dose of Inovio Pharmaceuticals' experimental vaccine to combat the Zika virus, the Plymouth meeting biotech company said Tuesday. Inovio is developing its Zika vaccine with partner GeneOne Life Science in South Korea. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Health Canada's Health Products and Food Branch have approved early-stage tests in 40 healthy adults, the company said. The tests will be done in Philadelphia, Miami, and Quebec City, and will evaluate safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of the vaccine against the mosquito-borne virus.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Drug maker GlaxoSmithKline said Thursday that it will collaborate with the National Institutes of Health to evaluate a new vaccine technology to protect against Zika virus. GSK said it has concluded feasibility assessments and is preparing research studies with the NIH. The technology, known as SAM (self-amplifying mRNA), is designed to produce an immune response but does not use a live or killed virus, as do many conventional vaccines. The GSK vaccine delivers nucleic acid to the cytoplasm of a cell, where it can "self-amplify" - and reproduce thousands of times.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
Drug maker Merck announced Wednesday a licensing agreement with a suburban Boston biotech company to develop and commercialize personalized cancer vaccines. Merck, which employs 9,200 in Montgomery County, will pay Moderna Therapeutics Inc. $200 million in cash. The Cambridge, Mass. company will do early research and development of its protein therapies based on "messenger RNA" or mRNA technology, which targets the unique properties of an individual's cancer, and carry development into clinical trials.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
The first testing in people of an experimental vaccine to combat the Zika virus will begin in the next several weeks, a Philadelphia-area biotech company announced Monday. Inovio Pharmaceuticals in Plymouth Meeting and partner GeneOne Life Science in South Korea said the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has given approval to begin early-stage tests in 40 healthy adults. Shares of Inovio rose 6.97 percent, or 73 cents, to $11.20 after the announcement. The tests will be done at three U.S. locations, including Philadelphia, and will evaluate safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of the vaccine against the mosquito-borne virus.
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