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Vaccine

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NEWS
August 23, 1989 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
State agriculture officials are urging South Jersey residents to get proper vaccine shots for their horses because of an illness that took the life of a horse in Waterford Township last week. The 1-year-old filly, which officials refused to identify to protect its owners, died from equine encephalitis, a disease that predominantly strikes horses and pheasants. The disease is contracted through mosquitoes that have preyed on wild, infected birds. No cases of the illness were reported in New Jersey last year, but the state - especially the southern end - has historically been hit hard by it. A few years ago, 26 horses in the state died of equine encephalitis.
NEWS
April 4, 1986 | By James McGregor, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A science watchdog group yesterday accused the Agriculture Department of licensing a new pig vaccine without sufficient testing of whether it could infect humans with an untreatable animal disease known as the "mad itch" that can kill within 48 hours of infection. The vaccine, which is the first genetically engineered vaccine to be licensed for commercial sale, was extensively tested last year in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan. It is being marketed in those three states and in Indiana, Nebraska and Iowa.
NEWS
July 30, 1986 | By Donald C. Drake, Inquirer Staff Writer
The American scientists most likely to develop a vaccine against AIDS were summoned to the National Institutes of Health this week to assess their progress and report on what still has to be done. Seated around a huge conference table and on tiered seats bordering it on three sides, 150 of the nation's brightest scientists exchanged data, challenged each other's theories and proposed tactics that might help stop the epidemic of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, which has struck more than 23,000 Americans, killing half of them.
NEWS
April 1, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert Austrian, 90, a maverick researcher who ignored the hubris of the medical community after the discovery of penicillin and developed a vaccine for a bacterium that kills many pneumonia victims, died of a stroke last Sunday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Austrian, a world-renowned researcher of infectious disease and a Penn professor since 1962, lived in Center City. "Antibiotics do not always destroy pneumococcal bacterium in the elderly and victims with compromised immune systems," said John Cohn, an allergy and pulmonary specialist at Thomas Jefferson University.
NEWS
June 26, 1991 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
A Merck & Co. lab technician who stored $21,024 worth of stolen hepatitis B vaccine from the West Point, Montgomery County, pharmaceutical company in her refrigerator pleaded guilty yesterday to 10 counts of receiving stolen property, but did not explain why she had the vaccine. Catherine Brennan's daughter, Aileen Brennan, 22, who also works at Merck, told company security guards about the vaccine. She told police before her mother's Oct. 16 arrest that her mother was mistakenly vaccinating the family against the AIDS virus and sending the vaccine to the poor in Haiti.
NEWS
June 23, 2011
The Tri-State Animal Emergency Center in Woolwich Township, Gloucestor County, will hold an emergency parvovirus vaccine clinic for dog owners on Saturday, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. "Parvovirus is a very scary disease because it strikes quickly and is often fatal," said Dr. Mark Magazu, medical director at the South Jersey center. "We're seeing a dramatic increase this year in incidents of parvo in our area, and as a community of pet owners we really have got to control this thing. It's a miserable disease that causes affected dogs to suffer horribly.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
Nuron Biotech Inc., a specialty biologies and vaccines company based in Exton, said it acquired from Pfizer Inc., the vaccine Meningitec, used for the prevention of a potentially deadly infection caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C. There are an estimated 500,000 cases of the infection annually worldwide, according to Nuron Biotech, but the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated the rate of infection in the U.S. is...
NEWS
August 1, 1989 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau The Associated Press contributed to this article
The New Jersey Supreme Court yesterday refused to allow the parents of a brain-damaged teenager to sue all of the makers of a vaccine she was given, because the parents did not know which company manufactured the one she took. The justices rejected a theory argued by the parents that each manufacturer should bear responsibility based on its market share of the drug, a vaccine to combat whooping cough. The drug companies argued that their increased liability in this case and others would reduce research and that fewer companies would market the drug.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia neurologist has invented a vaccine aimed at preventing brain damage from stroke. Matthew During of Thomas Jefferson University and a team of scientists report in today's issue of Science that when they gave the vaccine to rats and then induced a stroke, it appeared to reduce the death of brain tissue by about 70 percent. The vaccine is not designed to prevent strokes but is meant to protect the brain against some of the permanent damage that often leaves people paralyzed or impaired in their speech or memory.
NEWS
July 6, 2002 | By James M. O'Neill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
College students living in Pennsylvania dorm rooms must be vaccinated against meningitis this fall or sign a waiver indicating they have read about the vaccine's availability and declined immunization. The new law, signed by Gov. Schweiker last week, mirrors similar rules already in place in New Jersey and other states. State Sen. Don White (R., Indiana) introduced the bill after several meningitis cases cropped up among college students last year, including one that caused the death of La Salle University freshman Kerri Bessette.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 17, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Public-health experts cheered last month when a pivotal study showed GlaxoSmithKline's experimental shingles vaccine is much more effective than the established Merck vaccine. In the long run, the prospect of a better shingles shot could improve vaccination rates among people 60 and older, currently a disappointing 24 percent. But in the short run, the good news creates a bit of a quandary: Should older adults who want protection wait, probably a few years, for approval of the new vaccine, and hope the herpes zoster virus doesn't rear its excruciating rash in the meantime?
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | BY ADAM ZAKHEIM
A MEASLES outbreak among more than 100 children has turned political, and apparently so has hand-washing. Earlier this month, repeating the conservative trope of an over-regulated America, Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C., told a bipartisan group in our nation's capital that "restaurants should be allowed to opt out of certain regulations, like making employees wash their hands after going to the toilet. " This misguided belief in the primacy of individual liberty over the larger benefits of society often transcends political parties.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
During his recent trip to London, Gov. Christie provoked what the British call a row by winking at antivaccine know-nothingism even as measles cases surged back in the former colonies. Despite the governor's worst efforts, though, New Jersey has solid vaccination rules and impressive rates of child immunization. For evidence of the depredations of the nonsense the governor so ably articulated in Old Blighty, one has to look to the other side of the Delaware. In Pennsylvania, the measles vaccination rate among kindergartners last school year was worse than that of every other state save Colorado, according to a review by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NEWS
February 16, 2015 | By Amy Worden and Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writers
State Rep. Becky Corbin (R., Chester) knows about the ravages of contagious disease. Growing up in Johnstown in the 1950s before there was a measles vaccine, Corbin was one of the many thousands of children who contracted the disease. Corbin, who said she still bears the physical scars from measles, went on to become a pharmaceutical chemist. Now as a lawmaker she is spearheading legislation to end the exemption for those who have philosophical objections to vaccines. "I worked to combat the spread of disease, and nothing has been more effective in doing so than vaccinating children," she said Friday.
NEWS
February 10, 2015 | BY JOEL MATHIS & BEN BOYCHUK, Tribune News Service
    SUDDENLY, the debate over vaccines has gone mainstream. Amid a measles breakout - a disease that doctors believed had been eradicated a decade ago - a pair of Republican politicians came under fire for seemingly anti-vaccination comments. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said that vaccinations should largely be left to parents, while Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul said he believed that vaccinations can lead to "mental disorders" in children. The idea that vaccines cause autism has been debunked, but the declining vaccination rate is making the measles resurgence possible.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Pandering has no boundaries in politics, even when public health is at stake. Thus we had a U.S. senator and the governor of the most densely populated state in America suggesting in the midst of a measles outbreak that it's OK not to vaccinate children against contagious diseases. New Jersey's hypocritical Gov. Christie, who was once so insistent on protecting the public that he had a healthy nurse returning from Ebola-ravaged Africa involuntarily quarantined, told reporters in London this week that "parents need to have some measure of choice" as to having their children vaccinated.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Christie and other likely Republican presidential candidates have struggled with consistency in their public positions regarding the value of vaccines, but GlaxoSmithKline chief executive officer Andrew Witty has no such conflicts. "Generally, vaccines go through enormous amounts of testing on safety and efficacy," Witty said Wednesday from London in a conference call with reporters after GSK reported financial results for the fourth quarter and all of 2014. "Clearly, vaccines are a remarkable potential source of human health care.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMBRIDGE, England - After Gov. Christie said Monday that parents need "some measure of choice" on vaccinating their children, stirring alarm that such views would hurt the fight against a measles outbreak, his office moved quickly to clarify his position. The dustup overshadowed the second day of what Christie has planned mainly as a trade mission. Monday morning, the Republican governor, a potential candidate for president in 2016, responded to a question about the spread of measles by saying that while he and his wife had their children vaccinated, parental concerns warrant "balance.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three sets of parents called Sue Kressly's pediatric practice in Bucks County over the weekend with the same extraordinary question: Their children were not yet one year old, the minimum age to receive the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine. Could they get the MMR earlier? "I think it's a great sign," said Kressly, Pennsylvania chapter president of the American Academy of Pediatrics. "The conversation is changing from whether vaccines can do harm to one about how vaccines can protect you. " For years, pediatricians have been trying to persuade some parents that vaccines protect against diseases that are no longer commonly seen.
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