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Valery Gergiev

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NEWS
February 12, 1998 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
The long-anticipated return of Riccardo Muti, a focus on 18 works by American composers and the U.S. debut of a lost symphony highlight the Philadelphia Orchestra's upcoming 99th season. Music director Wolfgang Sawallisch, who outlined the new season yesterday, will conduct 11 of the 31 subscription programs, and delve into Americana - the Gershwin Piano Concerto for the composer's centenary and music by Barber, Hanson and Druckman. Former music director Riccardo Muti will return on Oct. 5 for one concert, an Italian program to benefit the orchestra's pension fund.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1998 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Philadelphia Youth Orchestra is on its way to Russia to join instrumentalists from eight other youth ensembles in an "Orchestra of the World. " As the only American orchestra in the World Youth Music Forum '98, the Philadelphians will play concerts in Moscow and Yaroslavl as well as in the massed orchestra extravaganza Wednesday in Red Square. The event is part of the World Youth Games being held in Moscow under the aegis of the International Olympic Committee. Joseph Primavera will conduct the orchestra in concerts at the Moscow Conservatory tomorrow and in Yaroslavl next Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1995 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After a while, it's hard to care much about Hermann, the lead in The Queen of Spades. He mopes around on stage for a full three acts bringing a black cloud - sometimes literally - wherever he goes. "What a pathetic creature I am," he sings. Pathetic, indeed. But Hermann is not alone. Misery loves company, and he's got plenty of it in the Metropolitan Opera's smart new production of Tchaikovsky's not-always-so-smart opera. Everybody has something to kvetch about in The Queen of Spades.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2002 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
The Kimmel Center will host at least six major visiting orchestras next season, plus the first visit by superstar Italian mezzo Cecilia Bartoli in 11 years. Four international orchestras are already inked in: the Kirov Orchestra with jet-set conductor Valery Gergiev, the Vienna Philharmonic led by Nikolaus Harnoncourt, the London Philharmonic under Kurt Masur, and the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra with Lorin Maazel. We'll also hear the Pittsburgh Symphony with Mariss Jansons and the Cleveland Orchestra led by Franz Welser-Most.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2002 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
Composer James Newton Howard scored the first two films by director M. Night Shayamalan, "The Sixth Sense" and "Unbreakable," and they've clicked again for "Signs. " Howard has a knack for flexibility, having worked on films as diverse as "Space Jam" (cartoons) "The Fugitive" (chase) and "Runaway Bride" (love story) while always providing music of depth and imagination. In "Signs," (Hollywood), Howard provides eerie music for the cornfield scenes with some churning Philip Glass-like sections, but always breaks out into something unexpected and original.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1999 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Valery Gergiev led the Philadelphia Orchestra in his local debut Thursday, conducting a program that inadvertently sharpened the debate over the orchestra's devotion to 20th-century music next season. Gergiev, leading Stravinsky, Debussy and Bartok, filled the Academy of Music as it hasn't been filled in a few weeks, with music that has been neglected by this orchestra. The leading Russian conductor of his generation, Gergiev, in his 40s, holds posts everywhere, from St. Petersburg to the Metropolitan Opera, and is one of the few who cruise the international orchestral scene as accepted superstars.
NEWS
October 11, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
PRINCETON - This time, the conductor had many moments to spare, but the Mariinsky Orchestra was late. And that can only mean one thing: Music director Valery Gergiev, infamous for arriving for concerts at the last possible minute, was never scheduled to be there. While Gergiev conducts at the Metropolitan Opera, Ignat Solzhenitsyn is taking three of the orchestra's U.S. tour dates. Though the orchestra had a delayed arrival from Ithaca, Solzhenitsyn was at Richardson Auditorium here, checking out the podium situation for a rare conducting appearance in the area without Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia (which he headed for 12 years, ending in 2010)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1998 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Silvery bodies bounced about the Metropolitan Opera House stage Saturday, brandishing bows and arrows to the familiar strains of Borodin's "Polyvetsian Dances. " Don't know these tunes? Well, one of them also goes by the name of "Strangers in Paradise," a hit song from a 1953 Broadway show called Kismet. But it wasn't the American musical onstage at the Met, it was the Kirov Opera's Prince Igor, for which Borodin first wrote those dances. It's one of four fascinating novelties the Kirov is presenting at the Metropolitan Opera House through May 9. Prince Igor is hardly the most interesting, but it definitely is a novelty: It was last staged in this house in 1917.
NEWS
April 5, 2005 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Despite all of their talk about courting nascent listeners, orchestras today forget that they used to give audiences more entry points, both in the concert hall and on disc. A Mussorgsky overture opened a window into his astonishing world of opera, a Rimsky dance attested to one of the most inventive orchestrators ever. None of this repertoire was a concession to quality. But somehow, although these works ceased to be overplayed decades ago, they retain the patina of being one step down on the scale of artistic importance.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1998 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Don't put your ear too close to the speaker when the Nutcracker does battle with the army of the Mouse King. You might get something shot off. At least it sounds that way in Valery Gergiev's new recording of The Nutcracker with the Kirov Orchestra (Philips). And that's not the recording's biggest surprise. Tchaikovsky's music for the popular ballet is laden with an even more torpid performance tradition than the composer's Symphony No. 5. We all know what to expect in the way of tempos, phrasing, the balance of the orchestral voices - and perhaps we like it that way. The Nutcracker is, after all, a Christmas piece, and what's Christmas without tradition?
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NEWS
October 11, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
PRINCETON - This time, the conductor had many moments to spare, but the Mariinsky Orchestra was late. And that can only mean one thing: Music director Valery Gergiev, infamous for arriving for concerts at the last possible minute, was never scheduled to be there. While Gergiev conducts at the Metropolitan Opera, Ignat Solzhenitsyn is taking three of the orchestra's U.S. tour dates. Though the orchestra had a delayed arrival from Ithaca, Solzhenitsyn was at Richardson Auditorium here, checking out the podium situation for a rare conducting appearance in the area without Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia (which he headed for 12 years, ending in 2010)
NEWS
July 14, 2013 | By Anne Midgette, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - On Saturday night, an elite orchestra made up of some of the best young musicians in the country, led by conductor Valery Gergiev, will take the stage at the Kennedy Center Concert Hall in Washington. It's not the Tanglewood Music Center Orchestra. Nor is it the orchestra that was just honed at the National Orchestral Institute, held annually at the University of Maryland. It isn't the New World Symphony. No, this one-of-a-kind youth orchestra is called the National Youth Orchestra of the United States of America; it was founded by Carnegie Hall, and it's in its maiden season.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Sometimes, the Philadelphia Orchestra needs an outsider to remind it of who it is and what it was. Gianandrea Noseda - a guest conductor so popular with the orchestra that he was reengaged for a two-week stint this season starting Thursday (with other return visits in the works) - happens to be the foremost Rachmaninoff specialist of his generation. This week, he's conducting that composer's Symphony No. 2 Thursday through Saturday at the Kimmel Center with what is generally considered to be "Rachmaninoff's orchestra.
NEWS
February 24, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Tours are tough for most symphony orchestras. But for the London Symphony Orchestra, tours are a break from a hectic schedule of recording film scores and preparing a full symphonic program that's performed only once or twice. So if playing Mahler's five-movement Symphony No. 7 under Valery Gergiev at the Kimmel Center on Tuesday was a relatively light day, it showed in the confidence with which the orchestra played music that lashes out in multiple directions - and in the dignity that brought to Gergiev's mercurial tendencies.
NEWS
February 24, 2010 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
If you were already feeling protective of an art form negotiating the twin land mines of irrelevance and financial peril, the sight of Verizon Hall Monday night could not have offered any comfort. All above-ground levels were closed off for a concert by the Mariinsky Orchestra - not for any building problems, but because of poor ticket sales. Even the one open level yawned bare in spots. About 850 people turned out in a hall that holds 2,500. "This is worse than our attendance," said a Philadelphia Orchestra cellist.
NEWS
February 18, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Big as an army, aggressive as a storm front, the Mariinsky Orchestra is descending on the United States in an ambitious tour that's audacious even by the company's own go-for-broke standards. While most orchestras are lucky to have sponsorship for a basic-repertoire tour, Mariinsky artistic director Valery Gergiev is bringing a company of 175 to Carnegie Hall for Berlioz's Les Troyens (March 9 and 10) and a comparable contingent to the Kennedy Center for Prokofiev's War and Peace (March 6 and 7)
NEWS
December 11, 2008 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Among the new generation of kid conductors, Yannick N?zet-S?guin looks the youngest, but at 33 is one of the oldest. And while he ranks in the minds of many with the sensationally kinetic Gustavo Dudamel, he at times conducts like a wise old man. Standing in front of the Philadelphia Orchestra yesterday morning, he confidently led the group through the core of its core repertoire, Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 6, speaking entirely through his...
NEWS
December 3, 2007 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Valery Gergiev plus Stravinsky's Rite of Spring plus the Kirov Orchestra might normally add up to only one thing: A musical bloodbath. Much to the credit of all three parties concerned, that wasn't what unfolded at Friday's Kirov Orchestra tour stop at the Kimmel Center. Stravinsky can do more than roar, and the performers now seem incapable of the kind of business-as-usual predictability this fairly standard program seemed to promise. About 15 years ago, when Gergiev and the orchestra began visiting the West, their poor-quality instruments yielded dullish tone, and the conductor could be dismissed as a fast-and-loud talent supported by an usually strong power base in St. Petersburg, Russia.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2007 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
This weekend, two of the most controversial and high-profile conductors on the planet will be in town, demonstrating the importance of podium image in today's classical-music world. Simon Rattle and Valery Gergiev are playing turnpike tag between the Kimmel Center and Carnegie Hall. Their appearances provide intriguing glimpses into the issues that will determine who will conduct the Philadelphia Orchestra in the future. The rock-star-hot Rattle, who turned down several American orchestras - including Philadelphia's - to accept the post of the Berlin Philharmonic, only guest-conducts one orchestra on this side of the Atlantic, and that's our own. He may be the only conductor with the clout to program a huge, virtually unknown choral work with six soloists and chorus - Schumann's "Die Paradies und der Peri" - which he conducts tonight in Carnegie Hall, then tomorrow and Sunday at the Kimmel Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2007 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
Philadelphia Orchestra audiences often bestow enthusiastic applause upon flutist Jeffrey Khaner, one of the ensemble's principal players signaled by conductors to take a special bow. He'll receive an even more prominent spotlight as he steps stage front as the orchestra's soloist. He's chosen the Concerto for Flute, written in 1908 by Carl Reinecke, who was a relatively neglected German pianist and composer of the late Romantic era. Khaner just performed three European concerts in Rotterdam, Netherlands; Budapest, Hungary; and Brussels, Belgium, with the World Orchestra for Peace, founded in 1995 by George Solti, who chose Khaner and our orchestra's principal oboist Richard Woodhams as first-chair players.
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