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ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1998 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
For a city so closely identified with realist art for so long, Philadelphia produces a fair amount of abstraction. That can be taken as a measure of abstraction's fundamental validity and appeal. If it can survive here, it can flourish anywhere. "Abstract Strategies," a group exhibition at the Philadelphia Art Alliance, doesn't make any overarching philosophical claims for abstract art. Neither does it attempt to analyze various approaches to it, as the exhibition title suggests.
NEWS
November 19, 1999 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Contending that the township committed procedural errors in bringing disciplinary charges against suspended Police Chief William Bourdon, who is accused of sexual harassment, his lawyer yesterday asked a hearing officer to dismiss the charges. The hearing, presided over by Camden County Municipal Judge Daniel Bernardin, was the second for Bourdon, whom the Township Committee is trying to remove from office. The committee voted unanimously Aug. 26 to suspend him without pay pending an investigation into police clerk Marlene Langan's allegations that he sexually harassed her for more than a year.
NEWS
January 13, 1986 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
Residents in southern Willistown have said that a proposed 15-home cluster development would put unwanted traffic onto North Dutton Mill Road, just north of an approved 119-lot development called Deerfield Knoll, and would cause traffic backups at the intersection with West Chester Pike. The concern was raised at a special hearing conducted by the Willistown Board of Supervisors Wednesday night to hear the application of John R. Samar, who owns the farm and stables at 973 N. Dutton Mill Rd. He was seeking permission to subdivide his 29-acre property into 16 lots.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1994 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An independent consultant has faulted as "unscientific" engineering studies done by the former One Meridian office tower's owner in a multimillion-dollar insurance dispute arising from the 1991 blaze that killed three firefighters. The building's owner, E/R Associates, and its insurance company, Aetna Casualty & Surety Co., are locked in a court battle in New York over how much Aetna should pay the owner for its losses. At the core of the dispute is whether the top half of the 38-story building, from the point where the fire started and then spread, should be demolished and rebuilt, as E/R insists, or, as Aetna argues, restored without demolition.
NEWS
February 4, 2013 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from an online discussion. Question: Last fall you had a column about a high school perfectionist who could have been me. I'm now in my 30s and long since healed thanks to great friends, an amazing therapist, and a lot of time. But I'm afraid my own daughter will go through what I went through. I can remember feeling guilty about letting people down when I was a toddler (although high school is where the pressure compounded into an eating disorder). As a parent, how do you see that and offer help . . . preferably long before it reaches such a crisis point?
SPORTS
October 10, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Former Florida Marlins manager John Boles voiced support for two former members of his staff who questioned the loyalty of infield coach Tony Taylor. "There's validity," Boles said of the accusations by departing pitching coach Rich Dubee and former bullpen coach Joe Breeden. Last week Dubee accused Taylor, a Phillies star in the 1960s, of having a role in Boles' firing May 28. "Whoever comes in to be the manager, I wish him a lot of luck, because there's a Benedict Arnold in the forces," Dubee said.
NEWS
February 26, 2002 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the future of one of their oldest investigatory tools in jeopardy, prosecutors began trying yesterday to persuade a federal judge to reverse his ruling barring them from using testimony on fingerprint identification in the region's first federal death-penalty trial. Stephen B. Meagher, a leading FBI fingerprint examiner, told U.S. District Judge Louis H. Pollak that all FBI examiners are tested annually for proficiency in print analysis and identification. Since annual testing began in 1995, Meagher testified, FBI examiners have taken 447 tests and have only once wrongly linked a print to an individual and three times missed an identification.
NEWS
May 6, 2005
I was pleased to see Daily News readers rallying to columnist Ronnie Polaneczky's defense. While I agree that it was a little extreme for her dad to call her out in the pages of the newspaper for which she works, I have a strong feeling that she may be used to such heated internecine debate. After reading her columns for months, I have no doubt that she can hold her own against opposing points of view no matter their origin, validity or histrionic approach. I have a sneaking suspicion that her father knows that, and though I think he showed bad judgment in doing so, I suspect that, along with his strong feelings on the issue of religion vs. the rights of women, is why he made his argument public.
LIVING
April 11, 1995 | By Shelly Phillips, FOR THE INQUIRER
In this era of corporate downsizing, career-changing, what-do-I-do-next- with-my-life mentality, many job-seekers believe that checking little black boxes on career tests equals exact science. If it says so on a computer printout, it must be right. Not so fast. The results that say you'd be happy as an aeronautical engineer, an evangelical minister or a flower arranger may measure only interest, not potential. You may be fascinated with planes but stink at physics, love people but speak in monosyllables, enjoy flowers but suffer allergies.
NEWS
April 17, 1999
'Facts' on the shroud are of questionable validity Alan Offermann attacks the "faithful" who believe the Shroud of Turin is the actual burial cloth of Jesus Christ (Letters, April 10). He claims that they are ignoring the "fact" that science has already proven the shroud to be a forgery. However, the "facts" he presents are either false or of dubious validity. Although radiocarbon dating did date the shroud to the 14th century, the results were not conclusive. There is sufficient reason to believe there may have been a false reading.
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SPORTS
January 26, 2015 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. - Darren Sproles started practice Friday with a video camera strapped to his chest. Midway through the session, the Eagles running back wanted to take it off. Never mind that he was practicing for the Pro Bowl, an exhibition in which the only football activity less intense than the game is the practice leading up to it. Sproles wanted to be at his best. To approach practice any other way would go against what made Sproles a Pro Bowler in the first place. Sproles said on Saturday that he has only "one speed," and Eagles coach Chip Kelly has called Sproles the "best training or practice player I've ever been around.
TRAVEL
August 5, 2013 | By Betsy L. Haase, For The Inquirer
Can a South Jersey girl pump gas and drive on her own to Maine? That was the question everyone, including myself, asked as I made plans to attend a weeklong writers' conference at the University of Southern Maine. Then I planned to head three hours farther north. It had been nearly 25 years since I was in Brooklin, Maine. I wanted to confirm my memories that Flye Point was one of the most beautiful spots on earth. After the conference, I felt like Rip Van Winkle as I headed out of the Brunswick area on Route 1. I drove across unfamiliar bridges and waterways.
SPORTS
March 19, 2013
Here's definite evidence that John Giannini has a quick ball club: "The players jumped up, and I didn't even get to see it," the Explorers coach said. "Lost my moment. " Players had erupted out of their seats Sunday when La Salle's name appeared on the television screen during the NCAA tournament selection show. The name didn't appear until the last regional was unveiled on CBS. I've been at close NCAA games with less tension in the air than inside that little conference room down the hall from the basketball office at Tom Gola Arena.
SPORTS
February 22, 2013 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
IN HONOR OF his 50th birthday, which was Wednesday, we honor Charles Barkley for saying, "I'm not a role model . . . Just because I dunk a basketball doesn't mean I should raise your kids. " Chuck was right. We should not allow our kids to worship athletes and other sports figures, because we are setting them up for disappointment. Teach them right from wrong and hopefully the rest will take care of itself. Sometimes, it's difficult. When it's a high-profile athlete who is consistently on TV commercials, magazine ads, has his own video game and is on "SportsCenter" every night, hero worship could become inevitable.
NEWS
February 4, 2013 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from an online discussion. Question: Last fall you had a column about a high school perfectionist who could have been me. I'm now in my 30s and long since healed thanks to great friends, an amazing therapist, and a lot of time. But I'm afraid my own daughter will go through what I went through. I can remember feeling guilty about letting people down when I was a toddler (although high school is where the pressure compounded into an eating disorder). As a parent, how do you see that and offer help . . . preferably long before it reaches such a crisis point?
NEWS
January 12, 2013 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There was no water at the well of the Philadelphia Historical Commission for those trying to stop the demolition of the historic double-spired Church of the Assumption on Spring Garden Street. On Friday, the Commission went into executive session and then issued an opinion that the demotion permit approved for the previous owner, the non-profit Siloam, remains valid for the new owners, commercial developers John Wei and Mika He. The Patrick Keeley-designed 1849 brownstone and copper Church where St. Katherine Drexel was baptized seemed closer than ever to the wrecking ball.
NEWS
September 23, 2012 | By Hank Kalet, NJ SPOTLIGHT
Legislation that would clarify what constitutes a legal exemption under New Jersey's school immunization law was approved by the state Senate Health, Human Services, and Senior Citizens Committee on Thursday after nearly three hours of contentious testimony. The bill now goes to the full Senate for a vote. The bill (S.B. 1759) was approved, 6-2, after about a dozen people spoke, mostly against the bill, saying parents have a right to opt out of child immunization. The law would require documentation when a parent wants to exempt a student from mandatory immunizations for medical or religious reasons.
NEWS
September 21, 2012 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
At least 28,500 students from more than 15 colleges will not be able to use their school IDs to vote in Pennsylvania in November, according to a study by a consumer-advocacy group. Under Pennsylvania's new voter-identification law - whose fate is still being considered by the courts - student photo-ID cards from accredited colleges and universities are among the documents that will be accepted at the polls as long as those IDs include an expiration date. Since April, nearly 100 higher-education institutions - including Pennsylvania State, Drexel, and Temple Universities, and Community College of Philadelphia - have made plans to alter their IDs to include expiration dates for the first time, according the Pennsylvania Public Interest Research Group (PennPIRG)
NEWS
September 20, 2012
Perhaps Chicago's teachers felt they were doing the rest of the country a favor by trying to force a debate on student tests with their strike. But with so many other distractions, including the murder of a U.S. ambassador in Libya and a presidential election campaign that has largely ignored public education, not enough people outside Chicago really focused on that part of the labor dispute. Salary and benefits are typically the areas of contention leading to strikes in any profession.
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