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Vanguard Funds

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BUSINESS
October 6, 1996 | By Cynthia Mayer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When legendary investor John Neff left the helm of Vanguard's Windsor fund after 31 years last Dec. 31, some investors wondered whether any mere mortal could match Neff's record of gaining 13.8 percent annually, on average. Vanguard headed off the worrying as best it could by reaching into its own ranks for a successor and picking Charles T. Freeman, who had worked under Neff for 26 years managing Windsor. Many investors - including Neff - left their money in the fund, waiting to see what Freeman would do. Well, here it is nine months later, with Freeman in control, and Windsor looks . . . well, as if Neff never left.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2002 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Vanguard Group was the top-selling mutual-fund company last year, putting the Malvern firm within striking distance of Fidelity Investments as the world's largest fund company. Investors poured $35.45 billion into Vanguard funds in 2001, which was about 30 percent of the $117 billion total in new fund investments, according to Financial Research Corp., of Boston. That brought the total invested in all Vanguard funds to $498.6 billion, compared with $546.9 billion for Fidelity, of Boston.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Why don't they just hire Vanguard ? The Pennsylvania State Employees' Retirement System thought some explaining was in order. PSERS needed $1.4 billion from state and local property taxpayers last year, and it expects to need $2.7 billion next year, it told legislators in February in its yearly report. That's after paying $552 million to hundreds of private investment firms - more than half the total for private equity, private debt, hedge, venture capital, commodity, and other investments you can't buy from a broker - to keep its assets from sliding farther below its liabilities.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2012 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
You might have invested in your retirement via 401(k) accounts, one of the primary vehicles by which we shoot for financial security after we stop working. We trust our employers to provide these plans at a low cost. Mark Mensack, a new cop on the 401(k) retirement beat, says we and our corporate plan sponsors might be getting ripped off. And he wants to help: Mensack's expertise is in the area of 401(k) hidden fees and ethical issues in the retirement-plan marketplace. He has 14 years of experience as a financial adviser with broker-dealers, and three as a registered investment adviser.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1993 | By Andrew Cassel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Vanguard Group said yesterday it wanted to lower the fees it pays to investment advisers for 16 of its mutual funds, which would save shareholders in those funds about $3.9 million per year. The Valley Forge mutual-fund group said it was seeking approval of the fee- schedule change from the funds' shareholders in proxy statements. Vanguard, the nation's second-largest direct-market mutual-fund company, operates more than 70 stock, bond and money-market mutual funds, some of which are managed by outside contractors.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2002 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Vanguard Group, the Malvern-based mutual fund company, has boosted its annual bonus to employees by 13 percent. More than 10,000 Vanguard workers who have been on the job since at least Dec. 31 learned of the increase in the company's "partnership points" bonus program this week. Depending on workers' job level and years of service, the increase can mean several thousand dollars of extra pay. Despite the weak investment climate and poor results for most U.S. stock investors, including owners of Vanguard's popular stock-index funds, Vanguard stock and bond funds generally made more (or lost less)
NEWS
October 9, 2012
DEAR HARRY : My father showed me an article about John Bogle (he's the guy who founded Vanguard Funds) in which Bogle once again promoted index funds. I have been an investor in no-load funds ever since I heard your favorable opinion at least 10 years ago. But I have never really understood why going for the "average" of a group (as you do in index funds) is better than going for a policy of beating the average. Don't we all hope that we can do better than the market average? Should I go for Bogle's advice, or should I look for the funds or individual stocks that have a good history and good prospects?
BUSINESS
December 17, 2003 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Vanguard Group said yesterday that it was introducing a completely automatic 401(k) plan to address the reluctance of many retirement savers to make investment decisions. The Malvern fund giant's One Step plan automatically enrolls participants in an appropriate mix of mutual funds, changes this allocation as they age, and increases their contribution levels each year. "Many workers struggle with making critical retirement-savings decisions," said Stephen Utkus, a researcher at the firm's Center for Retirement Research.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2011
In the Region Vishay buys resistor maker Vishay Intertechnology Inc. , Malvern producer of electronic components, said it paid $19.6 million for the resistor business of Huntington Electric Inc. The deal fits Vishay's strategy to grow through "niche acquisitions," Vishay CEO Gerald Paul said. Indiana-based Huntington, founded in 1950, sells resistors under the Huntington, Milwaukee, Central and Mills Resistors brands. - Harold Brubaker Vanguard funds go all-index The Vanguard Group , Malvern, said its four LifeStrategy funds, which have $25 billion in aggregate assets, will adopt an all-index fund approach, as opposed to the current mix of index funds and actively managed funds.
NEWS
March 6, 1994 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
John C. Bogle danced with the Platters on the Devon Music Fair stage at a Christmas celebration a few years back. John J. Brennan rode an elephant at the circus brought to town for the opening of the company's new $200 million office complex adjacent to Route 202 last September. As chairman and president, respectively, of the Vanguard Group of Investment Cos., each works hard at sharing his high spirits with Vanguard's 3,500 workers, called "the crew" by Bogle. "Our people are encouraged to have a good sense of humor," Bogle said in a recent interview.
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BUSINESS
March 17, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Why don't they just hire Vanguard ? The Pennsylvania State Employees' Retirement System thought some explaining was in order. PSERS needed $1.4 billion from state and local property taxpayers last year, and it expects to need $2.7 billion next year, it told legislators in February in its yearly report. That's after paying $552 million to hundreds of private investment firms - more than half the total for private equity, private debt, hedge, venture capital, commodity, and other investments you can't buy from a broker - to keep its assets from sliding farther below its liabilities.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2012 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
You might have invested in your retirement via 401(k) accounts, one of the primary vehicles by which we shoot for financial security after we stop working. We trust our employers to provide these plans at a low cost. Mark Mensack, a new cop on the 401(k) retirement beat, says we and our corporate plan sponsors might be getting ripped off. And he wants to help: Mensack's expertise is in the area of 401(k) hidden fees and ethical issues in the retirement-plan marketplace. He has 14 years of experience as a financial adviser with broker-dealers, and three as a registered investment adviser.
NEWS
October 9, 2012
DEAR HARRY : My father showed me an article about John Bogle (he's the guy who founded Vanguard Funds) in which Bogle once again promoted index funds. I have been an investor in no-load funds ever since I heard your favorable opinion at least 10 years ago. But I have never really understood why going for the "average" of a group (as you do in index funds) is better than going for a policy of beating the average. Don't we all hope that we can do better than the market average? Should I go for Bogle's advice, or should I look for the funds or individual stocks that have a good history and good prospects?
BUSINESS
October 1, 2011
In the Region Vishay buys resistor maker Vishay Intertechnology Inc. , Malvern producer of electronic components, said it paid $19.6 million for the resistor business of Huntington Electric Inc. The deal fits Vishay's strategy to grow through "niche acquisitions," Vishay CEO Gerald Paul said. Indiana-based Huntington, founded in 1950, sells resistors under the Huntington, Milwaukee, Central and Mills Resistors brands. - Harold Brubaker Vanguard funds go all-index The Vanguard Group , Malvern, said its four LifeStrategy funds, which have $25 billion in aggregate assets, will adopt an all-index fund approach, as opposed to the current mix of index funds and actively managed funds.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2006 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Doughty money manager John Neff has faith in the equally doughty American consumer. Spending as freely as ever, consumers will pave the way for a strong economy and strong stock market in 2006, Neff told the CFA Society of Philadelphia yesterday. "The economy still looks good to me," he said at the Racquet Club of Philadelphia. "The housing bubble, if there is one, is very, very local. " Neff beat the Standard & Poor's 500 index by an average of 3.15 percentage points a year over the 31 years that he managed the Vanguard Windsor Fund.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2004 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Vanguard Group is adding a second portfolio manager to its underachieving U.S. Growth mutual fund. The Malvern fund family said yesterday that William Blair & Co., of Chicago, took over management of 25 percent to 30 percent of the $7.3 billion fund from Alliance Capital Management. Alliance, a New York money manager, replaced Lincoln Capital Management in 2001. Vanguard hires outside managers for most of its actively managed funds - that is, funds that buy and sell stocks in search of higher investment returns.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2004 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Bogle's Vanguard Group is a low-cost, squeaky-clean provider of basic investments. Retired now, "St. Jack" draws crowds - and money to the mutual fund company - even though he turned over control to John Brennan in 1996. Brennan's Vanguard is remaking itself as a one-stop financial supermarket while continuing to wring out costs. A person with $10,000 invested at Vanguard, for example, paid an average of $25 in expenses to the company last year. But the Malvern company is stumbling under the burden.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2003 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Vanguard Group said yesterday that it was introducing a completely automatic 401(k) plan to address the reluctance of many retirement savers to make investment decisions. The Malvern fund giant's One Step plan automatically enrolls participants in an appropriate mix of mutual funds, changes this allocation as they age, and increases their contribution levels each year. "Many workers struggle with making critical retirement-savings decisions," said Stephen Utkus, a researcher at the firm's Center for Retirement Research.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2002 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Vanguard Group, the Malvern-based mutual fund company, has boosted its annual bonus to employees by 13 percent. More than 10,000 Vanguard workers who have been on the job since at least Dec. 31 learned of the increase in the company's "partnership points" bonus program this week. Depending on workers' job level and years of service, the increase can mean several thousand dollars of extra pay. Despite the weak investment climate and poor results for most U.S. stock investors, including owners of Vanguard's popular stock-index funds, Vanguard stock and bond funds generally made more (or lost less)
BUSINESS
January 29, 2002 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Vanguard Group was the top-selling mutual-fund company last year, putting the Malvern firm within striking distance of Fidelity Investments as the world's largest fund company. Investors poured $35.45 billion into Vanguard funds in 2001, which was about 30 percent of the $117 billion total in new fund investments, according to Financial Research Corp., of Boston. That brought the total invested in all Vanguard funds to $498.6 billion, compared with $546.9 billion for Fidelity, of Boston.
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