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Varicose Veins

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NEWS
January 26, 2014 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
Yoga offers remarkable benefits for the mind and body, but can it help varicose veins? Read on. Meanwhile, let's hear what Charles Dietzek says about this common affliction. Dietzek, 56, facetiously describes himself as a "glorified plumber"; he fixes the body's "blood pipes" - veins and arteries. More formally, he's a board-certified vascular surgeon at the Vein & Vascular Institute, whose main office is in Voorhees. In recent years, Dietzek has concentrated on veins. "In the arterial half of the vascular world, when things go bad, they go really bad," Dietzek said.
LIVING
March 1, 1993 | By Matthew Hoffman, FOR THE INQUIRER
She works out at least three times a week, and her legs, lean, strong and muscular, are the proof. She is proud of her legs. Not so the veins. Faint from a distance, these bursts of threadlike veins - a dozen or so on each leg - appear beneath the skin like subterranean lace. Doctors call them spiders. She wants them gone. Which is what brings her, a 29-year-old legal secretary who asked that her name not be used, to Steven S. Greenbaum's fifth-floor office on Ninth Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2013
VARICOSE VEINS are more than just ugly. They can be the reason for heaviness and aches in your legs, even if you are in great shape. Summer Sanders, former U.S. Olympic swimmer, gold medalist, fitness enthusiast and busy mother of two, was shocked to learn that hers were the reason for some bothersome symptoms. "My legs were achy and heavy, especially after a long day. I thought it was just from living an active lifestyle and, you know, getting older," the 40-year-old Sanders told me in a phone interview recently.
NEWS
December 9, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
When surgeons at St. Agnes Medical Center operated on Cardinal John Krol in May, they were able to stem the internal bleeding that had felled the leader of nearly 1.3 million Catholics in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. But Krol's doctors didn't disclose the underlying cause of the condition that they treated surgically, a condition that is generally a symptom of liver disease. Krol was treated for varicose veins of the esophagus (the muscular tube that carries food from the mouth to the stomach)
NEWS
February 12, 1992 | by Dr. Peter H. Gott, Special to the Daily News
Q: I'm an 80-year-old woman taking Capoten to control my high blood pressure. In the last year, I have been experiencing excessive perspiration, which I believe is related to the medicine. My doctor is puzzled because it's not supposed to be one of the drug's side effects, and he feels there is no connection. Could there be? A: Patients may experience unusual reactions to medicine. These reactions are not considered to be routine side effects but may represent an idiosyncratic response to the drug.
NEWS
June 10, 1991
Medicine in Soviet Bloc nations is said to be mediocre compared to the U.S. Jack Fallon, a Philadelphia physician's assistant, suggests "medical terminology" for Soviet healthcare providers: ARTERY - The study of fine paintings. BARIUM - What you do when CPR fails. CESAREAN SECTION - A district in Rome. COLIC - A sheep dog. COMA - A punctuation mark. CONGENITAL - Friendly. DILATE - To live long. FESTER - Quicker. GRIPPE - A suitcase. HANGNAIL - A coat hook.
NEWS
May 20, 1987 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer (The Associated Press contributed to this report.)
Cardinal John Krol, spiritual leader of more than a million local Roman Catholics, was doing well this morning after undergoing seven hours of surgery yesterday to halt internal bleeding. Dr. John Cossa of St. Agnes Medical Center in South Philadelphia, where the operation was performed, said Krol, 76, was generally in good health and "tolerated the surgery without any incident. He's doing well. " While Krol is hospitalized, Bishop Martin Lohmuller will lead the Philadelphia archdiocese, the archdiocese announced.
NEWS
December 23, 1990 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Let this be a lesson: Do not hold your nose when you sneeze. Bernice Adams, 60, said she always did when she was a child, and it eventually produced a blush of tiny red lines - broken blood vessels - on her cheeks. She endured the blemish for years because the conventional cure would have been painful and only partly effective. But an advanced laser technology recently cleared her complexion. "I was thrilled, I want to tell you," Adams said early this month. The secretary, no longer ruddy-cheeked, works for Avrom S. Brown, a family practice physician who two months ago began offering treatments using the first copper vapor laser in the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
November 24, 1989 | By NICHOLAS H. MORGAN
The other night Sarah, who's almost 9, came clattering down the stairs in her mother's high heels with a big grin on her face. My whole low-heeled life passed before my watery eyes. "Why? Why? Why are you wearing those?" I wailed, my calm, wise father act temporarily dislodged. "Must another generation put fashion before its feet?" I pumped her for a response. She stopped, bewildered by this unmannerly invasion into her fantasy world. "I am Princes Eglantina," she said, sweeping her stole over her shoulder.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 28, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Maurice Kanbar got headaches from drinking alcohol, he came up with a solution: Skyy Vodka, regular vodka minus the impurities that he said gave him headaches. He also invented the "D-Fuzz-It" sweater comb and a hypodermic needle protector to prevent health-care workers from getting pricked. But the wealthy San Francisco entrepreneur has another claim to fame: He's the godfather of Philadelphia University. He is the biggest donor in the university's history. He gave his alma mater a whopping $21 million during its current capital campaign - more than half the amount the university was aiming to raise.
NEWS
January 26, 2014 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
Yoga offers remarkable benefits for the mind and body, but can it help varicose veins? Read on. Meanwhile, let's hear what Charles Dietzek says about this common affliction. Dietzek, 56, facetiously describes himself as a "glorified plumber"; he fixes the body's "blood pipes" - veins and arteries. More formally, he's a board-certified vascular surgeon at the Vein & Vascular Institute, whose main office is in Voorhees. In recent years, Dietzek has concentrated on veins. "In the arterial half of the vascular world, when things go bad, they go really bad," Dietzek said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2013
VARICOSE VEINS are more than just ugly. They can be the reason for heaviness and aches in your legs, even if you are in great shape. Summer Sanders, former U.S. Olympic swimmer, gold medalist, fitness enthusiast and busy mother of two, was shocked to learn that hers were the reason for some bothersome symptoms. "My legs were achy and heavy, especially after a long day. I thought it was just from living an active lifestyle and, you know, getting older," the 40-year-old Sanders told me in a phone interview recently.
NEWS
January 5, 2012 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
SO, EAGLES WIDE receiver DeSean Jackson has apologized for acting like a diva in 2011. "I can admit to certain things affecting me during the season," Jackson said Sunday, after the Birds' win against the Redskins at the Linc. "I just want to apologize. I could have handled things differently. " No doubt many fans accustomed to Jackson's swagger were startled by his chastened behavior. Was it sincere? Or was Jackson playing the penance card to gild his chances of being re-signed by the Birds?
NEWS
December 20, 2004 | By Mark McDonald INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
A man who saved America - and probably the world - is living out his days on a tiny pension in a dank apartment in a forlorn suburb of Moscow. He has a bad stomach, varicose veins, and a mangy, spotted dog named Jack the Ripper. Stanislav Petrov's life is small now. He walks Jack, makes tea from herbs he picks in the park, and harangues his 34-year-old son about getting off the computer and finding a girlfriend. There was a time when Petrov, now a 65-year-old widower, was almost larger than life, a privileged member of the Soviet Union's military elite, a lieutenant colonel on the fast track to a generalship.
NEWS
July 16, 1997 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
Don't exercise in broad daylight, do read plenty of books about blizzards and don't forget to nosh on some chilled oysters and vichyssoise. If it related to heat, it was fit to broadcast yesterday, as the third day of the city's blazing heat wave provided plenty of fodder for local television stations obsessed with weather. "There is a great public interest in weather," said KYW-TV (Channel 3) Acting News Director Paul Gluck. "What we can't control, we're all fascinated by. " From the ludicrous to the life-and-death, here's a look at some of approaches local stations tried yesterday: KYW (Channel 3)
LIVING
March 1, 1993 | By Matthew Hoffman, FOR THE INQUIRER
She works out at least three times a week, and her legs, lean, strong and muscular, are the proof. She is proud of her legs. Not so the veins. Faint from a distance, these bursts of threadlike veins - a dozen or so on each leg - appear beneath the skin like subterranean lace. Doctors call them spiders. She wants them gone. Which is what brings her, a 29-year-old legal secretary who asked that her name not be used, to Steven S. Greenbaum's fifth-floor office on Ninth Street.
NEWS
February 12, 1992 | by Dr. Peter H. Gott, Special to the Daily News
Q: I'm an 80-year-old woman taking Capoten to control my high blood pressure. In the last year, I have been experiencing excessive perspiration, which I believe is related to the medicine. My doctor is puzzled because it's not supposed to be one of the drug's side effects, and he feels there is no connection. Could there be? A: Patients may experience unusual reactions to medicine. These reactions are not considered to be routine side effects but may represent an idiosyncratic response to the drug.
NEWS
June 15, 1991 | By JEFF GREENFIELD
Dear Graduates: Since another graduation season has passed without an opportunity to speak to the graduates of a major American university - or the National Tractor-Trailer Driving Institute - I am taking word processor in hand to address these words to you, the students of today, who will be the debtors of tomorrow. I seek to leave you with words that will echo down the path of life for decades; you seek the quickest way out of the parking lot. I seek to fill you with wonder; you wonder what that cute economics major is wearing under those black robes.
NEWS
June 10, 1991
Medicine in Soviet Bloc nations is said to be mediocre compared to the U.S. Jack Fallon, a Philadelphia physician's assistant, suggests "medical terminology" for Soviet healthcare providers: ARTERY - The study of fine paintings. BARIUM - What you do when CPR fails. CESAREAN SECTION - A district in Rome. COLIC - A sheep dog. COMA - A punctuation mark. CONGENITAL - Friendly. DILATE - To live long. FESTER - Quicker. GRIPPE - A suitcase. HANGNAIL - A coat hook.
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