CollectionsVegetable Garden
IN THE NEWS

Vegetable Garden

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2013 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Tend the vegetable garden. We've been lucky the harvest season has lasted this far into October. I'm still waiting to harvest the carrots and sweet potatoes, hoping they'll get as large as possible before frost. I've picked and enjoyed the various tomatoes daily. But when all the stems and vines eventually wither and die, gather them up and dispose of them to make sure that pest problems aren't left to overwinter in the garden. Put away the cages, tepees, and trellises. If you haven't done it yet, take notes about where you planted each crop so you can rotate them to different locations in the garden next year.
NEWS
May 29, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
SURE, tightrope walkers and acrobats once perfected their balance in the vacant lot beside the University of the Arts on Broad Street near Pine. But usually, the gravelly lot stands empty, garnering nary a glance from passers-by. That will change today, when the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society officially opens its new pop-up garden, where visitors can watch artists perform, enjoy some brews and food from a beer garden and otherwise relax amid lush plantings. All sorts of art will be on display, including dance, theater, live music, photography, sculpture, design and other visual art (but, sadly, not the tightrope walkers and acrobats, who were Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts performers)
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Howard Brosius is trying to be heard above the buzz of a dozen small children recently liberated from day care. "Who wants some black-seeded Simpson?" he shouts, holding up the ruffled, light green leaves of this 150-year-old lettuce variety. In a room full of veteran vegetable gardeners, this would provoke a stampede. Here, in a small classroom at Awbury Arboretum in Germantown, the kids have no idea what black-seeded means or who Simpson was. But they know whatever "Mr. Howard" is offering, they want.
NEWS
June 27, 2012 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
When devoted gardeners run out space in their backyards, they often tear up the old plantings to make room for the new. But Andrew Bunting, a horticulturist with a magazine-worthy ornamental garden behind his ivy-covered stone cottage in Swarthmore, had a different idea. In January, he asked neighbors Clair and Rob Oaks, with whom he had a cordial but not close relationship, if he could use a section of their backyard for a vegetable garden that they would share. He would design, install, and cultivate the plot, and even pay them $100 a month in rent.
NEWS
February 12, 1989 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
As you plan your vegetable garden, think beyond lettuce, tomatoes and string beans. Think about the onion. Last year, John Swan grew six varieties of onions in the garden that he and his wife, Ann, tend in Chester County. As an expert cook, Ann Swan welcomes this bounty to use in her kitchen year-round. Even now, the Swans still have a couple of large bags on hand in an outside closet to tide the family over until the '89 harvest starts in mid- July. John Swan used to start most of his onions from seed.
NEWS
April 7, 1997 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Rena Ennis can nail a green thumber a mile away. Ok, five feet. It's all in the nails. The longer the fingernails, the bigger the odds they're not a green thumber. "When I see a woman with long, manicured nails, I know she is not going to come out and garden," said the 73-year-old grandmother. "You get a lady with fine nails, you know she's only going to look, not participate. " Ennis has been "digging and planting all over" her West Philadelphia neighborhood for 37 years, mostly as a volunteer with the Pennsylvania Horticulture Society's Philadelphia Green, an urban greening program designed to help residents spruce up their communities with various flowers, plants and trees.
LIVING
July 5, 1987 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
My feelings about the garden are divided in July. In some ways I love it for the first beans, for the early tomatoes and eggplant, but sometimes I wish it wouldn't cry out for help on the hottest days of the year. There's a bonus in those hot days, however. They force the gardener out of bed early on the weekend to beat the heat, and I, for one, relish the quiet early mornings with just the dogs and birds as my companions. As you cruise around your garden early on a July morning, look at it with an eye to next year.
NEWS
September 26, 1993 | By Jane G. Pepper, FOR THE INQUIRER
Any garden in good shape at the end of a hot, dry summer has to belong to an ardent gardener. In Marcia Spoor's case, she borders on the passionate side of ardent. With four children under the age of 10, it's amazing that she and her husband, Paul, can find any time to garden, but the two of them make a great team. He wields the tools; she digs and plants. Theirs is a corner lot in Folsom, Delaware County, and when the Spoors moved into the house 14 years ago, Marcia moved from houseplant lover to outside planter.
LIVING
May 3, 1987 | By Jane Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
May has to be the best of months in the garden. The dogwoods are blooming, tulips and daffodils abound, the first lettuce is ready and by the end of the month there are peas for the table. Like April, this is a wonderful month to plant, because it should be cool, and we hope for adequate rainfall to avoid dragging out the hoses. In the flower garden, you can plant perennials anytime during the month. With annuals, plant the hardier ones, such as alyssum and petunias, at the beginning of the month.
LIVING
September 22, 1995 | By Sue Chastain, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thirty years ago, he was an undercover cop in Detroit. His cover? That of a tree trimmer, landscaper and seed salesman. Then an injury forced him out of police work, and Jerry Baker became a gardener for real. And not just any gardener. Baker, 64, styles himself "America's Master Gardener," and his accomplishments - 45 gardening books including two best- sellers, several PBS specials and a bimonthly newsletter with a circulation of more than 100,000 - substantiate the claim.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2013 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Tend the vegetable garden. We've been lucky the harvest season has lasted this far into October. I'm still waiting to harvest the carrots and sweet potatoes, hoping they'll get as large as possible before frost. I've picked and enjoyed the various tomatoes daily. But when all the stems and vines eventually wither and die, gather them up and dispose of them to make sure that pest problems aren't left to overwinter in the garden. Put away the cages, tepees, and trellises. If you haven't done it yet, take notes about where you planted each crop so you can rotate them to different locations in the garden next year.
NEWS
October 8, 2013 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
THE EVIDENCE of Khenti Pratt's dedication to her Powelton Village community garden is very visible. There's the award she won at the state Horticultural Society's City Gardens Contest several years ago. There's hundreds of dollars' worth of receipts for supplies and materials she and other volunteers have purchased. And then there are the plump butternut squash, tomatoes, okra and other vegetables still growing in the yard, nestled between rowhouses on Spring Garden Street near 36th.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writer rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
ON A RECENT sunny afternoon in Brewerytown, a white terry-cloth towel lay on the sidewalk, hiding the blood of an 18-year-old kid gunned down the night before. Along the narrow block, chalk circles drawn by homicide cops marked spots where the shell casings fell. A woman seated on a lawn chair on the sidewalk nearby looked up warily and called out, "You looking for a story?" She pointed out the cracked-open sunflower seeds, lots of them, scattered among the crime-scene chalk marks.
NEWS
May 29, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
SURE, tightrope walkers and acrobats once perfected their balance in the vacant lot beside the University of the Arts on Broad Street near Pine. But usually, the gravelly lot stands empty, garnering nary a glance from passers-by. That will change today, when the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society officially opens its new pop-up garden, where visitors can watch artists perform, enjoy some brews and food from a beer garden and otherwise relax amid lush plantings. All sorts of art will be on display, including dance, theater, live music, photography, sculpture, design and other visual art (but, sadly, not the tightrope walkers and acrobats, who were Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts performers)
NEWS
June 27, 2012 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
When devoted gardeners run out space in their backyards, they often tear up the old plantings to make room for the new. But Andrew Bunting, a horticulturist with a magazine-worthy ornamental garden behind his ivy-covered stone cottage in Swarthmore, had a different idea. In January, he asked neighbors Clair and Rob Oaks, with whom he had a cordial but not close relationship, if he could use a section of their backyard for a vegetable garden that they would share. He would design, install, and cultivate the plot, and even pay them $100 a month in rent.
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Howard Brosius is trying to be heard above the buzz of a dozen small children recently liberated from day care. "Who wants some black-seeded Simpson?" he shouts, holding up the ruffled, light green leaves of this 150-year-old lettuce variety. In a room full of veteran vegetable gardeners, this would provoke a stampede. Here, in a small classroom at Awbury Arboretum in Germantown, the kids have no idea what black-seeded means or who Simpson was. But they know whatever "Mr. Howard" is offering, they want.
NEWS
April 9, 2010 | By Kim Palmer, STAR TRIBUNE
MINNEAPOLIS - Dawn Steward was one of many rookie gardeners who tried growing vegetables for the first time last year. But her yields were underwhelming. "I didn't know what I was doing," Steward said of her attempt to start peppers and shallots from seed in her St. Paul, Minn., home. "They were fine until I watered them. Then they all died. I think it was my lack of experience. " Still, that didn't dampen her enthusiasm. Homegrown produce has too many benefits not to keep trying, she figures.
LIVING
June 12, 2009 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Asia Freeman and the other third-grade gardeners at Emlen School may not be certified locavores yet. But after a spring spent planting and tending a vegetable garden outside their East Mount Airy school, they've learned to dig in lettuce and radish seeds, tomato and pepper plants; to water and weed; and to ponder questions of food and nutrition that bedevil some of us for a lifetime. Such as: What did we just eat? What's in it? And, this is a biggie: Why did we eat it? About a dozen kids were involved in the after-school garden club, which just finished its second year.
NEWS
April 19, 2009 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Instant gratification has never been the point of gardening. Patient gardeners wait years for plants to pop and call it therapy. But these days, gardeners are in a hurry like everyone else. You want an instant garden? You've got it, pal, just like those do-it-yourself TV shows that convert bare earth to lush Edens in a matter of minutes. All sorts of low-cost, no-work gardens are for sale out there, not all promising a miracle. They're part of a $36 billion market for lawn and garden supplies that's been growing steadily for three years and is expected to keep going.
LIVING
August 29, 2008 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Roger Doiron has an idea for the next eater-in-chief: Bring back the victory garden! He wants the next president to plant an organic vegetable garden on the front lawn of the White House, one that would supply fresh produce to the first family and local food cupboards; set an example of self-sufficiency, healthy eating and sustainability for the whole country; and make a statement about what we grow in front of our homes. He calls this vision "Eat the View," and here's the statement it (he)
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|