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Vegetable Garden

NEWS
April 9, 2010 | By Kim Palmer, STAR TRIBUNE
MINNEAPOLIS - Dawn Steward was one of many rookie gardeners who tried growing vegetables for the first time last year. But her yields were underwhelming. "I didn't know what I was doing," Steward said of her attempt to start peppers and shallots from seed in her St. Paul, Minn., home. "They were fine until I watered them. Then they all died. I think it was my lack of experience. " Still, that didn't dampen her enthusiasm. Homegrown produce has too many benefits not to keep trying, she figures.
NEWS
April 16, 1989 | By Jane Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
On a 7,000-square-foot plot in a community garden, Elise Payne used to produce tomatoes by the bushel and winter squash by the barrel. In recent years, her vegetables decimated by rabbits, deer and groundhogs, Payne, of Strafford in Chester County, has switched crops and now grows thousands of flowers, most of which she dries for mounting on gift items that she sells through a small business. Payne misses the vegetables, but she's become fascinated by the variety of flowers that are easy to grow and equally easy to preserve for winter color if you harvest them at the right moment.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2015 | By Sally McCabe, For The Inquirer
Do some intensive vegetable gardening. There's a long weekend ahead, and, hopefully, you'll spend part of it in the garden. Keep cool-season greens picked, and as they go to seed, get ready to do that last harvest before composting the remains, or turning them under along with some well-rotted compost. Do some succession planting: Plant a few rows of squash or beans, but save some room to put in another planting of the same thing in two weeks. This theoretically spreads out the harvest over a longer time, although, in reality, it will all come in while you're on vacation.
NEWS
May 15, 1987 | By ROSE DeWOLF, Daily News Staff Writer
You take your suburban vegetable gardener . . . He may think he knows it all. But, let's face it, how much to do have to know to grow a beet in the 'burbs? You just run out in your backyard, toss a seed in the soil, and water it with the lawn hose . . . In the city, it's different . . . and much more difficult. In the city, folks rarely have enough ground - or ground that gets enough sun - for a backyard garden. So they have to find patches of open land somewhere else . . . maybe a house has been torn down, maybe a trash-strewn lot can be cleared . . . In the city, you have to know such tricks as how to get water from the corner fire hydrant.
FOOD
March 11, 1998 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
There were flowery foods and menus blooming all over town last week as the Philadelphia Flower Show added distinctive food elements to its celebration of aesthetic gardening. The show's "La Passion du Jardin" theme linked the culinary and horticultural aspects of French gardens and featured Anne Willan, founder of France's La Varenne cooking school in Burgundy, and prominent local chefs for cooking demonstrations, wine tastings, dinners, and other special events. The annual indoor preview of spring was presented by the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society.
LIVING
August 29, 2008 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Roger Doiron has an idea for the next eater-in-chief: Bring back the victory garden! He wants the next president to plant an organic vegetable garden on the front lawn of the White House, one that would supply fresh produce to the first family and local food cupboards; set an example of self-sufficiency, healthy eating and sustainability for the whole country; and make a statement about what we grow in front of our homes. He calls this vision "Eat the View," and here's the statement it (he)
NEWS
April 12, 1996 | For The Inquirer / BOB HILL
Bill Dupper Jr. of Swedesboro carries on a family tradition of maintaining a vegetable garden that belonged to his grandfather. Dupper yesterday spread lime to neutralize the acid in the soil.
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Aubrey Whelan, and Chris Mondics, STAFF WRITERS
She was too young to be his wife. Too old to be holding his hand. But the Amish teenager - "gifted" to the scruffy, heavily bearded, and long-haired man when she was 14 and he was 47 - became his common-law wife, bearing him one daughter at the age of 15 and another girl just six months ago. They caught their neighbors' attention, raising concerns and eyebrows as they walked outside. Now 18, the young woman, her daughters - and nine other young girls who may be her little sisters - lived for several years with Lee Kaplan in his modest, three-bedroom white bungalow on Old Street Road in the Bucks County working-class community of Feasterville.
NEWS
April 4, 2008
You can tell Joy Larkcom's had decades of experience growing vegetables. One clue is her long list of books, which includes Organic Salad Garden , Oriental Vegetables , and The Vegetable Garden Displayed . Another clue is the sheer number of practical ideas in the newly revised edition of her 1997 book Creative Vegetable Gardening (Sterling Publishing, $19.95). Larkcom has been ahead of the vegetable-gardening trend, documented anew last month by the Garden Writers Association Foundation.
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