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Vegetables

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NEWS
June 4, 2011 | By Kirsten Grieshaber, Associated Press
BERLIN - Schools have pulled raw vegetables from menus, piles of cucumbers sit untouched on shop shelves, and farmers say they are losing millions. As scientists scramble to find the source of an E. coli outbreak linked to raw vegetables that has killed 18 in Europe and sickened nearly 2,000, consumers are swearing off lettuce, cucumbers, and tomatoes just in case. "Cook it or don't eat it," Hamburg kidney specialist Rolf Stahl said at a news conference Friday. "That's my personal recommendation.
NEWS
June 3, 2011
Growing up, I firmly believed two things. First, I would one day be the starting power forward for the Philadelphia 76ers. Second, vegetables are bad. As I've gotten older, I've realized I lack both the height and the array of post moves to make it as an NBA starter. But the years have only affirmed my instincts about vegetables. The herbivore camp will point to the various health benefits of consuming leaves, stems, and roots. But these pale compared with the emotional, physical, and monetary costs.
FOOD
April 18, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
It's not enough to get kids to just fork down their vegetables. I want them to embrace carrots and onions and peas, to get excited about green beans and sweet potatoes and beets. So my plan for the fourth cooking class at Henry Lawton Elementary School was to take familiar vegetables and prepare them in an unfamiliar way. I chose a soup made with onion, carrots, and sweet potatoes to demonstrate how different vegetables can feel in your mouth when made a certain way, in this case, all blended together; and how different they can taste when seasoned with spices, in this case curry and paprika.
FOOD
October 4, 2012 | By Alison Ladman, Associated Press
It may seem odd to turn on the oven when making soup, but roasting really is what makes this soup so spectacular. Roasting the vegetables caramelizes them and brings out nutty flavors that enhance all the other ingredients. Feel free to throw in just about any other vegetables you have lurking in your crisper drawer. Roasted Vegetable Soup Makes 6 servings 2 large yellow onions,    cut into wedges 2 medium zucchini,    diced 2 medium summer    squash, diced 4 large carrots,    peeled and diced 2 medium potatoes,    peeled and diced 2 tablespoons vegeta-    ble or canola oil Salt and ground black    pepper 1/2 teaspoon ground    cumin 1 quart low-sodium    chicken or vegeta-    ble broth Sour cream or yogurt,    to serve Chopped fresh cilant-    ro or parsley, to serve 1. Heat the oven to 400 F. 2. In a large bowl, combine the onions, zucchini, summer squash, carrots, and potatoes.
FOOD
April 4, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Even before the others had shed their backpacks and donned their aprons, Nick Rodriguez, 10, was smashing a clove of garlic, slamming his fist on the flat side of a knife, at our second cooking class at Henry Lawton Elementary. Yes, he said, without looking up, he had already peeled it. "Hey! I want a turn!" said Christian McKinney, 11, feeling like he was missing out. "Hang on, guys," I said. While I was thrilled with the enthusiasm and the smashing skill retained from class the week before, I wanted to remind them to read the entire recipe before plowing in. So each took a turn reading part of the instructions for tortelloni minestrone soup (we substituted the smaller tortellini)
NEWS
October 5, 2011 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delaware County is taking from the bad guys to give to the good guys. State-of-the-art equipment once used to grow marijuana will soon be used to grow vegetables and herbs in Philadelphia, G. Michael Green, Delaware County's district attorney, said Tuesday. The equipment, seized in a Chester drug bust, will be donated to Cheyney University and the Partnership CDC, of West Philadelphia. It will expand the Urban Food Lab at the Partnership CDC's facility at 4020 Market St., Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Chester police raided a former drugstore in May 2011, what they found gave new meaning to the term high tech. In the basement was a hydroponic marijuana farm of serious sophistication. Nearly 100 pot plants, from seedlings to lush, 4-foot bushes, flourished in large tubs of water. Faux sunshine from dozens of commercial-grade grow lights powered by industrial generators shone down on a crop worth at least $43,000. The confiscated equipment typically would have sat in a warehouse until it could be auctioned or destroyed.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
CAVEMEN had all the time in the world. Those single-minded Homo sapiens didn't have to worry about multitasking or time clocks. Which is why weary home cooks following a gluten-free diet - or simply trying to feed their families fresh, healthful food - may say "paleo-schmaleo" when trying to follow in our ancestors' knuckle-dragging steps. The much-hyped paleo diet - or lifestyle, if you will - tosses out the agricultural products incorporated into the human diet over the past, say, 10,000 years in favor of a whole-foods approach to eating meat, plants and seafood that dates back to cave-dwelling days.
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Dan Meyers, For The Inquirer
Coming soon to a minor-league ball game near you: Broccoli. Days after a national physicians group renewed its push to get the Phillies' triple-A affiliate, the Lehigh Valley IronPigs, to include vegetables on its pork-laden stadium menu, the team has agreed to add the green stalk. But there's a catch. Bacon is involved, and, it turns out, some national publicity as well for the IronPigs' response. The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM), a nonprofit based in Washington, asked the team Monday to go easy on the bacon and other processed meat, which the group said is unhealthy, and get some vegetables on fans' plates.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew Olson, a horticulturist and co-owner of Farm 51, a West Philadelphia vegetable garden, spends his days navigating all the familiar obstacles that come with farming on vacant lots: limited water access, soil contamination, land tenure, and security concerns. But these days his harvest is fewer turnips, more tulips. Last fall, he and business partner Erica Maust launched Chicory, an urban flower farm and design studio on two quarter-acre parcels, one in West Philadelphia and another in Roxborough.
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NEWS
June 26, 2015 | BY ANNIE PALMER, Daily News Staff Writer palmera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
IT WAS 2011. Outside City Hall were rows of tents where many flavors of political persuasion could be found - anarchists, communists, Democratic socialists, libertarians. This was Occupy Philadelphia, or, as Dusty Hinz remembers it, a "great coming-out party for the general left. " Amid the monthslong protests, a splinter group of twentysomethings formed with a plan to sustain the protests' energy in a way that would bring real change to city neighborhoods. Dubbed Occupy Vacant Land, the group of guerrilla gardeners squatted on dozens of vacant, garbage-strewn properties.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2015 | By Sally McCabe, For The Inquirer
Do some intensive vegetable gardening. There's a long weekend ahead, and, hopefully, you'll spend part of it in the garden. Keep cool-season greens picked, and as they go to seed, get ready to do that last harvest before composting the remains, or turning them under along with some well-rotted compost. Do some succession planting: Plant a few rows of squash or beans, but save some room to put in another planting of the same thing in two weeks. This theoretically spreads out the harvest over a longer time, although, in reality, it will all come in while you're on vacation.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew Olson, a horticulturist and co-owner of Farm 51, a West Philadelphia vegetable garden, spends his days navigating all the familiar obstacles that come with farming on vacant lots: limited water access, soil contamination, land tenure, and security concerns. But these days his harvest is fewer turnips, more tulips. Last fall, he and business partner Erica Maust launched Chicory, an urban flower farm and design studio on two quarter-acre parcels, one in West Philadelphia and another in Roxborough.
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Dan Meyers, For The Inquirer
Coming soon to a minor-league ball game near you: Broccoli. Days after a national physicians group renewed its push to get the Phillies' triple-A affiliate, the Lehigh Valley IronPigs, to include vegetables on its pork-laden stadium menu, the team has agreed to add the green stalk. But there's a catch. Bacon is involved, and, it turns out, some national publicity as well for the IronPigs' response. The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM), a nonprofit based in Washington, asked the team Monday to go easy on the bacon and other processed meat, which the group said is unhealthy, and get some vegetables on fans' plates.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | BY SHARYN JACKSON, Tribune News Service
SLAVES to the recipe, listen up. If you think everything has to be perfect, that instructions must be followed to a T, that any deviation might result in total tasteless disaster, a more easygoing approach could do you good. You'll find one in Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything Fast . The New York Times food columnist and author of several doorstops full of recipes in the How to Cook Everything series has made ease one of his signature ingredients. In his new book, he's taken that approach a step further by rewriting the recipe for people who use recipes as a crutch.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
THERE ARE slow days in Tattle and then there are sloooooooo wwwwwww days. And thus we have an item about adult retailer Hustler Hollywood announcing that its national chain of stores is launching a #StopVegetableAbuse campaign, with the hope of getting women (and some men) to buy real sex toys. Nope, not an April Fools' joke. Hustler Hollywood claims that every day, cucumbers, zucchinis and carrots are improperly exploring strange new worlds far from the salad bar, in ways different from how the laws of nature intended.
FOOD
March 27, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
As our second cooking class got underway at Roberto Clemente Middle School, I was amazed at how quickly these eighth graders had gotten the hang of things. They filed in, stashed their backpacks, donned their aprons, washed hands, and turned to the recipe. "We're making the winter minestrone today," announced Tatiana Castillo, 13, completely in charge. A new student joined us, our only boy, Raul Camacho, 14, who sports a thick shock of dyed-blue hair and hip black glasses. I wasn't sure what to expect, but he was quiet and serious, and actually a calming addition to our group.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Personal chef Christopher Lee Abbott, also known as Chef Kristov, is passionate about healthy, tasty cuisine - even working two acres of farmland on a co-op in Delaware to cultivate fresh ingredients to use in his dishes. Born and raised in Philadelphia, Abbott, 49, learned to cook from watching his grandmother in the kitchen. He also worked alongside Keven Parker back when Parker was his neighbor and operating a catering business from his basement before opening Ms. Tootsie's Restaurant Bar and Lounge on South Street.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
CAVEMEN had all the time in the world. Those single-minded Homo sapiens didn't have to worry about multitasking or time clocks. Which is why weary home cooks following a gluten-free diet - or simply trying to feed their families fresh, healthful food - may say "paleo-schmaleo" when trying to follow in our ancestors' knuckle-dragging steps. The much-hyped paleo diet - or lifestyle, if you will - tosses out the agricultural products incorporated into the human diet over the past, say, 10,000 years in favor of a whole-foods approach to eating meat, plants and seafood that dates back to cave-dwelling days.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2015
DAWN ROBERTS is sizzling hot. She's not afraid to show off her buff new body - and she's ready to share how she got it! The 45-year-old West Philadelphia native, co-owner of KD Communications Group, skillfully juggled career, marriage and motherhood for years while always making fitness a priority. She was fit, for sure, but had grown frustrated about her weight. The former long-distance high-school track athlete and former ambassador for Black Girls Run had come to a crossroads: She'd been "running consistently for five years, and I was not getting faster and hadn't lost a pound.
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