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FOOD
July 14, 2016
Makes about 6 cups 1 teaspoon coriander seeds 1 teaspoon mustard seeds 1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds 2 cups apple cider vinegar 5 whole cloves garlic 3 thin slices ginger 1 small yellow onion, halved and julienned 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar 7 teaspoons kosher salt 2 teaspoons curry powder 1 teaspoon black peppercorns 1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric 1 small head of cauliflower, cut into 2-inch florets...
NEWS
June 3, 2011
Growing up, I firmly believed two things. First, I would one day be the starting power forward for the Philadelphia 76ers. Second, vegetables are bad. As I've gotten older, I've realized I lack both the height and the array of post moves to make it as an NBA starter. But the years have only affirmed my instincts about vegetables. The herbivore camp will point to the various health benefits of consuming leaves, stems, and roots. But these pale compared with the emotional, physical, and monetary costs.
NEWS
June 4, 2011 | By Kirsten Grieshaber, Associated Press
BERLIN - Schools have pulled raw vegetables from menus, piles of cucumbers sit untouched on shop shelves, and farmers say they are losing millions. As scientists scramble to find the source of an E. coli outbreak linked to raw vegetables that has killed 18 in Europe and sickened nearly 2,000, consumers are swearing off lettuce, cucumbers, and tomatoes just in case. "Cook it or don't eat it," Hamburg kidney specialist Rolf Stahl said at a news conference Friday. "That's my personal recommendation.
FOOD
April 18, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
It's not enough to get kids to just fork down their vegetables. I want them to embrace carrots and onions and peas, to get excited about green beans and sweet potatoes and beets. So my plan for the fourth cooking class at Henry Lawton Elementary School was to take familiar vegetables and prepare them in an unfamiliar way. I chose a soup made with onion, carrots, and sweet potatoes to demonstrate how different vegetables can feel in your mouth when made a certain way, in this case, all blended together; and how different they can taste when seasoned with spices, in this case curry and paprika.
FOOD
August 19, 2016 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Summer's bounty of perfect fruits and vegetables arrives - at bargain prices - just at the moment when you would rather be at the beach than behind the stove. The desire to fire up the grill is greatly reduced with each 90-plus-degree day. This is the moment to exact maximum flavor from ripe, locally grown produce with minimal time in the kitchen. This is the time when a little bit of salt, olive oil, and herbs can transform a basket of fresh-picked beauties into a scrumptious meal in minutes.
FOOD
October 4, 2012 | By Alison Ladman, Associated Press
It may seem odd to turn on the oven when making soup, but roasting really is what makes this soup so spectacular. Roasting the vegetables caramelizes them and brings out nutty flavors that enhance all the other ingredients. Feel free to throw in just about any other vegetables you have lurking in your crisper drawer. Roasted Vegetable Soup Makes 6 servings 2 large yellow onions,    cut into wedges 2 medium zucchini,    diced 2 medium summer    squash, diced 4 large carrots,    peeled and diced 2 medium potatoes,    peeled and diced 2 tablespoons vegeta-    ble or canola oil Salt and ground black    pepper 1/2 teaspoon ground    cumin 1 quart low-sodium    chicken or vegeta-    ble broth Sour cream or yogurt,    to serve Chopped fresh cilant-    ro or parsley, to serve 1. Heat the oven to 400 F. 2. In a large bowl, combine the onions, zucchini, summer squash, carrots, and potatoes.
FOOD
August 18, 2016
Makes 4 to 6 servings 1/2 cup good white wine 1/4 cup water 1/2 cup fruity olive oil Zest and juice of 1/2 lemon, divided use 2 cloves garlic, smashed and peeled 1 bay leaf Several sprigs fresh thyme Several threads of saffron or dried calendula petals Salt and fresh ground pepper to taste 2 to 3 small leeks, well washed and trimmed, halved if large, with enough root to hold it together as it cooks ...
FOOD
April 4, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Even before the others had shed their backpacks and donned their aprons, Nick Rodriguez, 10, was smashing a clove of garlic, slamming his fist on the flat side of a knife, at our second cooking class at Henry Lawton Elementary. Yes, he said, without looking up, he had already peeled it. "Hey! I want a turn!" said Christian McKinney, 11, feeling like he was missing out. "Hang on, guys," I said. While I was thrilled with the enthusiasm and the smashing skill retained from class the week before, I wanted to remind them to read the entire recipe before plowing in. So each took a turn reading part of the instructions for tortelloni minestrone soup (we substituted the smaller tortellini)
NEWS
October 5, 2011 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delaware County is taking from the bad guys to give to the good guys. State-of-the-art equipment once used to grow marijuana will soon be used to grow vegetables and herbs in Philadelphia, G. Michael Green, Delaware County's district attorney, said Tuesday. The equipment, seized in a Chester drug bust, will be donated to Cheyney University and the Partnership CDC, of West Philadelphia. It will expand the Urban Food Lab at the Partnership CDC's facility at 4020 Market St., Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Chester police raided a former drugstore in May 2011, what they found gave new meaning to the term high tech. In the basement was a hydroponic marijuana farm of serious sophistication. Nearly 100 pot plants, from seedlings to lush, 4-foot bushes, flourished in large tubs of water. Faux sunshine from dozens of commercial-grade grow lights powered by industrial generators shone down on a crop worth at least $43,000. The confiscated equipment typically would have sat in a warehouse until it could be auctioned or destroyed.
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FOOD
August 19, 2016 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Summer's bounty of perfect fruits and vegetables arrives - at bargain prices - just at the moment when you would rather be at the beach than behind the stove. The desire to fire up the grill is greatly reduced with each 90-plus-degree day. This is the moment to exact maximum flavor from ripe, locally grown produce with minimal time in the kitchen. This is the time when a little bit of salt, olive oil, and herbs can transform a basket of fresh-picked beauties into a scrumptious meal in minutes.
FOOD
August 18, 2016
Makes 4 to 6 servings 1/2 cup good white wine 1/4 cup water 1/2 cup fruity olive oil Zest and juice of 1/2 lemon, divided use 2 cloves garlic, smashed and peeled 1 bay leaf Several sprigs fresh thyme Several threads of saffron or dried calendula petals Salt and fresh ground pepper to taste 2 to 3 small leeks, well washed and trimmed, halved if large, with enough root to hold it together as it cooks ...
FOOD
July 14, 2016
Makes about 6 cups 1 teaspoon coriander seeds 1 teaspoon mustard seeds 1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds 2 cups apple cider vinegar 5 whole cloves garlic 3 thin slices ginger 1 small yellow onion, halved and julienned 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar 7 teaspoons kosher salt 2 teaspoons curry powder 1 teaspoon black peppercorns 1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric 1 small head of cauliflower, cut into 2-inch florets...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2016 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
Sure, Parth Chauhan likes providing unblemished, just-picked lettuce, kale, cilantro, and other herbs and vegetables to his South Jersey community. And although the 25-year-old is sold on the concept - "This is a way for us to be on the cutting edge of technology," he said - starting HomeGrown Farms was just as much about satisfying his desire to work with his lifelong best friends, Raghav Garg and Zeel Patel. Joint ventures are, after all, something the Eastern High School alums have always done well: selling candy bars and soda in middle school, hosting a dance for local high school students, and starting the Voorhees Youth Cricket League.
FOOD
May 27, 2016
Makes 4 servings 1 cup dried white or yellow beans, such as cannellini, lima, or mayocoba, soaked for at least 8 hours and preferably overnight 8 cups water, or more as needed 2 bay leaves 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for garnish 13/4 teaspoons sea salt 2 medium leeks or 2 medium-bulb spring onions, or a combination, white and light-green parts thinly sliced (if using spring onions, thinly slice the green...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2016 | By Kimberly Garrison
RAW AND VEGAN lifestyles have finally gone mainstream. In fact, some might even say they are the newest epicurean delight. That's right: Move over bacon, and so long Wheaties, there's a new breakfast of champions in town. From the hills of Hollywood to the bodegas of Manhattan, everyday folks are clamoring for smoothies, raw juices, tofu wraps, and raw energy balls. There are many reasons more Americans are embracing various forms of vegetarianism, but at the heart of the matter is people's desire to eat cleaner, lighter, and healthier.
NEWS
April 10, 2016
A 34-year-old Camden man was sentenced Friday to 74 years in prison for kidnapping and shooting of a woman he allegedly had previously assaulted and who remains in a vegetative state. Allan Mattocks must serve at least 64 years before becoming eligible for parole for his conviction on kidnapping, attempted murder, witness tampering, witness retaliation, aggravated assault and other offense, the Camden County Prosecutor's Office said. Prosecutors said Mattocks kidnapped the then 48-year-old Camden woman on April 12, 2013, shot her in the head and dumped her in a vacant lot in East Camden's Marlton section.
FOOD
March 11, 2016
A broth without additives In an entrepreneurship class at Penn State's business school, David Sirott and Donnie Weissberg collaborated on a project to make and sell an all-natural, no-salt-added, superfood vegetable broth. Now, Sirott, of Graduate Hospital, and Weissberg, of New York, have launched the business. Their Wild IS! broth, made with kale, spinach, celeriac, basil, and green tea powder extract, is a mild-tasting base for your vegetable soups. Available in local Whole Foods stores (see wild-is.com for a list)
FOOD
February 26, 2016 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Hairy, bumpy, and misshapen, root vegetables are hardly glamorous produce. But these kitchen workhorses are ideal for hearty meals, especially in the pre-green months. "When root vegetables are cooked well, they're naturally sweet and they can really hold their own as the center of the plate," says Jon Cichon, chef of Lacroix. The trick is to make them feel exciting. Often relegated to prepackaged soup kits or the forlorn corners of the supermarket shelf, the less familiar roots and tubers are nevertheless worth exploring.
FOOD
February 5, 2016 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
We have seen the future of food and it's served in a bowl, on top of rice, along with an attractive arrangement of brightly colored vegetables, garnishes, and sauce. It's nutritious, it's cheap, it's bursting with flavor and texture: The rice bowl is everything. "It's a way of eating that's been around for 2,000 years," says David Katz, culinary director of HoneyGrow restaurants, now with seven locations in the region. "People around the world find rice comforting - it's like soul food.
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