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FOOD
August 14, 2015
Grain bowls like Jessica Koslow makes are incredibly adaptable. You can use almost anything in your kitchen, if you apply a little good sense and keep in mind a few basic rules. First, of course, comes the grain. Koslow prefers rice, like the brown rice grown in California by Koda Farms: "It's so healthy and it tastes so good. It's brown but not too brown. " But you can use any other cooked whole grain, such as farro, barley or quinoa. The grain has to be well-seasoned. Koslow dresses the rice in her bowls with both butter for body and an acid for tartness.
NEWS
August 30, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
What it is: Sometimes one thing - perhaps a song or a place - can encapsulate an entire summer in one neat sensory keepsake. Maybe it's a meal in which tastes and textures converge to create a bit of summer bliss on a plate - like the broiled Atlantic flounder with Jersey Fresh vegetables served at the Oyster Creek Inn in Leeds Point. Chef Scott Kuppel says the rustic restaurant, at the edge of a salt marsh, usually begins serving the fish dish in June, just when delectable Jersey-grown veggies such as sweet corn, tomatoes, and spinach are coming into season.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Personal chef Christopher Lee Abbott, also known as Chef Kristov, is passionate about healthy, tasty cuisine - even working two acres of farmland on a co-op in Delaware to cultivate fresh ingredients to use in his dishes. Born and raised in Philadelphia, Abbott, 49, learned to cook from watching his grandmother in the kitchen. He also worked alongside Keven Parker back when Parker was his neighbor and operating a catering business from his basement before opening Ms. Tootsie's Restaurant Bar and Lounge on South Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013
DID YOU know you could save anywhere from $500 to $1,000 a year by growing your own vegetables? They will be fresher and tastier than store-bought, too. And you don't need a huge plot of land; many varieties can be grown in containers. My lovely mother-in-law, who has a green thumb and a wonderful vegetable garden of her own, has agreed to school me on the fine art of home-growing fruits and vegetables. Here are the five I plan to start with: 1. CUCUMBERS A good source of B vitamins.
NEWS
May 18, 2012 | By Sam Hananel, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Is it really more expensive to eat healthy? An Agriculture Department study released Wednesday found that most fruits, vegetables and other healthy foods cost less than foods high in fat, sugar and salt. That counters a common perception that it's cheaper to eat junk food than a nutritionally balanced meal. The government says it all depends on how you measure the price. If you compare the price per calorie - as some previous researchers have done - then higher-calorie pastries and snacks might seem like a bargain compared with fruits and vegetables.
FOOD
July 5, 2013 | By Joe Yonan, Washington Post
It was one of the first pasta dinners I made after my sister and brother-in-law announced they were going vegan. We were in their kitchen in southern Maine, where I spent last year helping them with their homestead, and I was making a sauce from the best of the early summer produce, right from the huge garden outside. It was based on the classic French side dish of braised lettuce and peas, but I turned it Italian by tossing it with curly pasta and a touch of mint. As it neared readiness, I needed to make ask them to make one - OK, two - little exceptions to their diet in service of the dish and its integrity.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2012 | Beth D'Addono
HALF THE FUN of being on vacation is changing the routine, especially when it comes to meals. Follow these tips from healthydiningfinder.com to be sure all that road food doesn't turn you into a wide load. Choose dishes flavored with herbs and spices instead of rich sauces, gravies or dressings. If you order sauces, ask for them on the side and go easy. It's all about portion sizes, even when it comes to healthy meals at restaurants. Share an entrée along with an added salad or side, or take a portion of the meal to go. Order a dinner salad or broth-based soup to help fill up before your main course.
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Schools here and throughout America will begin serving healthier meals with the start of the academic year, and everyone is awaiting the verdict of 32 million spork-wielding food critics. How will often-finicky schoolchildren react to increased fruits and vegetables; more whole grains; reduced amounts of saturated fat, trans fat, and sodium; and no more whole milk, among other changes? Influencing the outcome will require a sizable stick, served up with the carrots. If children don't include a fruit or vegetable with their lunch, they will either have to pay full price for it or not eat at all, according to new rules from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which administers the National School Lunch Program in 101,000 schools.
NEWS
October 5, 2012
Kids may not like it, but schools are on the right track with healthier lunch menus that serve up more fruits and vegetables and less junk food. Under nutritional standards that took effect this year, cafeterias must serve twice as many fruits and vegetables while limiting proteins and carbohydrates. High school students are restricted to a maximum of 850 calories. The healthier menu was pushed by first lady Michelle Obama as part of her Let's Move campaign to fight childhood obesity.
NEWS
June 3, 2011 | Associated Press
LONDON - Scientists yesterday blamed Europe's worst recorded food-poisoning outbreak on a "super-toxic" strain of E. coli bacteria that may be brand new. But while suspicion has fallen on raw tomatoes, cucumbers and lettuce as the source of the germ, researchers have been unable to pinpoint the food responsible for the frightening illness, which has killed at least 18 people, sickened more than 1,600 and spread to least 10 European countries. An alarming number of victims - about 500 - have developed kidney complications that can be deadly.
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