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Vegetables

ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013
DID YOU know you could save anywhere from $500 to $1,000 a year by growing your own vegetables? They will be fresher and tastier than store-bought, too. And you don't need a huge plot of land; many varieties can be grown in containers. My lovely mother-in-law, who has a green thumb and a wonderful vegetable garden of her own, has agreed to school me on the fine art of home-growing fruits and vegetables. Here are the five I plan to start with: 1. CUCUMBERS A good source of B vitamins.
NEWS
May 18, 2012 | By Sam Hananel, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Is it really more expensive to eat healthy? An Agriculture Department study released Wednesday found that most fruits, vegetables and other healthy foods cost less than foods high in fat, sugar and salt. That counters a common perception that it's cheaper to eat junk food than a nutritionally balanced meal. The government says it all depends on how you measure the price. If you compare the price per calorie - as some previous researchers have done - then higher-calorie pastries and snacks might seem like a bargain compared with fruits and vegetables.
FOOD
May 24, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Deborah Madison - gardener, author, restaurateur and chef - is famous for her love of vegetables and deep knowledge of vegetarian cooking. But ask her about veggie burgers, and you get a surprising blast. "I hate the word 'veggie.' I don't even like the word 'burger,' " she says, "and I'm not really into veggie burgers. " Like it or not, the veggie burger is everywhere these days, from fast-food chains to hipster hangouts and places in between, including the frozen-food case in the supermarket.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2012 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
  WHEN first lady Michelle Obama launched her Let's Move! initiative in February 2010, it brought attention to school lunches, food deserts in urban neighborhoods and the rise in obesity, particularly among children and the poor. Among the results so far has been a campaign to make locally grown and healthy foods available in all communities, including city neighborhoods with few fresh-food resources. Change often comes slowly and, to paraphrase the adage, you may be able to lead the horse to an organic carrot, but you can't necessarily make it eat it. Mary Seton Corboy, founder of Greensgrow, Philadelphia's most successful urban farm, has been vocal about her frustration that her Kensington neighbors have been reluctant to give up their corner-store calories and opt in to Greensgrow's fresh and local fare.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2011 | By DAN GERINGER, geringd@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
PUTTING HIS money where his dream is, Marathon Restaurants CEO Cary Borish is investing $100,000 to turn a long-vacant, blighted Brewerytown lot into Marathon Farm, which will supply his six Philadelphia eateries with fresh vegetables and feed the residents of a neighborhood that has seen its share of hard times. Although the third-of-an-acre lot on the corner of 27th and Master streets is still bordered by the ancient redbrick walls of a city warehouse that collapsed 20 years ago, Borish watched happily Sunday as blight gave way to beautiful on its way to bountiful.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2012 | Beth D'Addono
HALF THE FUN of being on vacation is changing the routine, especially when it comes to meals. Follow these tips from healthydiningfinder.com to be sure all that road food doesn't turn you into a wide load. Choose dishes flavored with herbs and spices instead of rich sauces, gravies or dressings. If you order sauces, ask for them on the side and go easy. It's all about portion sizes, even when it comes to healthy meals at restaurants. Share an entrée along with an added salad or side, or take a portion of the meal to go. Order a dinner salad or broth-based soup to help fill up before your main course.
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Schools here and throughout America will begin serving healthier meals with the start of the academic year, and everyone is awaiting the verdict of 32 million spork-wielding food critics. How will often-finicky schoolchildren react to increased fruits and vegetables; more whole grains; reduced amounts of saturated fat, trans fat, and sodium; and no more whole milk, among other changes? Influencing the outcome will require a sizable stick, served up with the carrots. If children don't include a fruit or vegetable with their lunch, they will either have to pay full price for it or not eat at all, according to new rules from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which administers the National School Lunch Program in 101,000 schools.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
CSAs, short for community supported agriculture, help farmers finance their growing expenses while offering participants great, fresh produce at peak season. Inna Spivakova and her boyfriend, Dan Manders, have been members of the Greensgrow CSA for three years now. They chose it because, while Greensgrow is an urban farm in Kensington, the CSA, started in 2002, is stocked by area farmers (more than 50 within 150 miles, according to its website). They also liked the option of getting a half share every other week, instead of weekly.
NEWS
June 3, 2011 | Associated Press
LONDON - Scientists yesterday blamed Europe's worst recorded food-poisoning outbreak on a "super-toxic" strain of E. coli bacteria that may be brand new. But while suspicion has fallen on raw tomatoes, cucumbers and lettuce as the source of the germ, researchers have been unable to pinpoint the food responsible for the frightening illness, which has killed at least 18 people, sickened more than 1,600 and spread to least 10 European countries. An alarming number of victims - about 500 - have developed kidney complications that can be deadly.
FOOD
September 6, 2013 | By Debra Nussbaum, For The Inquirer
Birthday cake in the kitchen today to celebrate September birthdays! Try my homemade cheesecake in the break room refrigerator. Enjoy! Happy Fall - Apple cider doughnuts at the front desk! If you are one of the 150 million full-time or part-time workers in the United States, you can probably relate to the high-fat, low-fiber, loaded-with-carbs goodies that often make their way into the workplace. Employers frequently entice employees to meetings with pizza lunches, doughnuts, and sodas, and employees often want to share food to create an atmosphere of camaraderie and good will.
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