CollectionsVegetables
IN THE NEWS

Vegetables

FIND MORE STORIES »
FOOD
January 29, 2016 | By Jill P. Capuzzo, For The Inquirer
For many of us living in the cold climes of the Northeast, the start of the year presents something of a consumption conundrum. We vow to knock off those extra pounds racked up from our holiday indulgences and promise we'll stick to our New Year's resolutions to eat more healthily. Meanwhile, the low temperatures and shorter days find us desperately craving hearty dishes filled with carbohydrates and fats. Scientific studies support our comfort food urges: everything from how the body takes more time to break down foods dense in calories, thereby releasing a steady flow of energy to stave off the cold, to the psychological response to seasonal affective disorder that has us reaching for mac and cheese or chicken pot pie to overcome the gloom from lack of daylight.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013
DID YOU know you could save anywhere from $500 to $1,000 a year by growing your own vegetables? They will be fresher and tastier than store-bought, too. And you don't need a huge plot of land; many varieties can be grown in containers. My lovely mother-in-law, who has a green thumb and a wonderful vegetable garden of her own, has agreed to school me on the fine art of home-growing fruits and vegetables. Here are the five I plan to start with: 1. CUCUMBERS A good source of B vitamins.
FOOD
April 18, 2013 | By W. Wayt Gibbs, Associated Press
Nothing is more frustrating than finding the perfect cucumber or head of lettuce at the farmers' market, paying top dollar for it, and then tossing it out a week later when it has gone moldy or slimy in the refrigerator. No doubt, one reason so many of us eat too many convenience foods and too few fruits and vegetables is that it can be hard to get our busy schedules in sync with the produce we bring home. Food scientists, however, have discovered a remarkably effective way to extend the life of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables by days or even a week.
NEWS
May 18, 2012 | By Sam Hananel, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Is it really more expensive to eat healthy? An Agriculture Department study released Wednesday found that most fruits, vegetables and other healthy foods cost less than foods high in fat, sugar and salt. That counters a common perception that it's cheaper to eat junk food than a nutritionally balanced meal. The government says it all depends on how you measure the price. If you compare the price per calorie - as some previous researchers have done - then higher-calorie pastries and snacks might seem like a bargain compared with fruits and vegetables.
NEWS
August 30, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
What it is: Sometimes one thing - perhaps a song or a place - can encapsulate an entire summer in one neat sensory keepsake. Maybe it's a meal in which tastes and textures converge to create a bit of summer bliss on a plate - like the broiled Atlantic flounder with Jersey Fresh vegetables served at the Oyster Creek Inn in Leeds Point. Chef Scott Kuppel says the rustic restaurant, at the edge of a salt marsh, usually begins serving the fish dish in June, just when delectable Jersey-grown veggies such as sweet corn, tomatoes, and spinach are coming into season.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2012
"A LOT of people might be very surprised at the number of African Americans who are health-conscious and who are vegan," Evelyn Redcross said. She wasn't kidding. I've been told, straight-faced, that "black vegans" are nonexistent, since the "veggie" thing is just spoiled white college kids acting out. But there are many reasons and rationales for eating vegan and vegetarian. Redcross believes a more health-conscious attitude in her own community is helping bring people out to the vegan brunch she and her husband, Mercer, throw nearly every Sunday at the 7165 Lounge, their banquet facility in the former North by Northwest on Germantown Avenue in Mount Airy.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Personal chef Christopher Lee Abbott, also known as Chef Kristov, is passionate about healthy, tasty cuisine - even working two acres of farmland on a co-op in Delaware to cultivate fresh ingredients to use in his dishes. Born and raised in Philadelphia, Abbott, 49, learned to cook from watching his grandmother in the kitchen. He also worked alongside Keven Parker back when Parker was his neighbor and operating a catering business from his basement before opening Ms. Tootsie's Restaurant Bar and Lounge on South Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2012 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
  WHEN first lady Michelle Obama launched her Let's Move! initiative in February 2010, it brought attention to school lunches, food deserts in urban neighborhoods and the rise in obesity, particularly among children and the poor. Among the results so far has been a campaign to make locally grown and healthy foods available in all communities, including city neighborhoods with few fresh-food resources. Change often comes slowly and, to paraphrase the adage, you may be able to lead the horse to an organic carrot, but you can't necessarily make it eat it. Mary Seton Corboy, founder of Greensgrow, Philadelphia's most successful urban farm, has been vocal about her frustration that her Kensington neighbors have been reluctant to give up their corner-store calories and opt in to Greensgrow's fresh and local fare.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
LAST SUMMER, Blair Shaw, an attorney who lives in Brewerytown, regularly walked his dog, Bailey, past a dense weed jungle on Master Street near 27th, unaware that in 2011 it had been Marathon Farm, an oasis of veggies in an urban food desert. Its motto: "Spreading the Love: one carrot at a time!" But by 2013, the Marathon Grill restaurant chain, which had cleared the third-of-an-acre lot and created Marathon Farm with such high hopes, suffered financial setbacks and pulled out. By last summer, the raised wood-frame beds had deteriorated and disappeared in the tall weeds, leaving no clue of their brief "one carrot at a time" history.
FOOD
July 5, 2013 | By Joe Yonan, Washington Post
It was one of the first pasta dinners I made after my sister and brother-in-law announced they were going vegan. We were in their kitchen in southern Maine, where I spent last year helping them with their homestead, and I was making a sauce from the best of the early summer produce, right from the huge garden outside. It was based on the classic French side dish of braised lettuce and peas, but I turned it Italian by tossing it with curly pasta and a touch of mint. As it neared readiness, I needed to make ask them to make one - OK, two - little exceptions to their diet in service of the dish and its integrity.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|