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Vegetables

FOOD
October 9, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Brian Sirhal and Tim Spinner - the duo behind the Mexican trio of Cantina Feliz, La Calaca Feliz, and Taqueria Feliz - are spinning pizzas with their new suburban project, Pizzeria Felici . Pizzeria Felici (see what they did with the name?) is in the Elements Horsham at 303 Horsham Rd. (215-323-4530). Specialty is Neopolitan-style pizza cooked in a double-hearthed, wood-fired oven. Menu, designed by chef Jim Burke (ex-James), includes starters/antipasti, pastas, and entrees. Michael Brenfleck, last at La Calaca Feliz in Fairmount, is chef.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2016 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
Sure, Parth Chauhan likes providing unblemished, just-picked lettuce, kale, cilantro, and other herbs and vegetables to his South Jersey community. And although the 25-year-old is sold on the concept - "This is a way for us to be on the cutting edge of technology," he said - starting HomeGrown Farms was just as much about satisfying his desire to work with his lifelong best friends, Raghav Garg and Zeel Patel. Joint ventures are, after all, something the Eastern High School alums have always done well: selling candy bars and soda in middle school, hosting a dance for local high school students, and starting the Voorhees Youth Cricket League.
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Schools here and throughout America will begin serving healthier meals with the start of the academic year, and everyone is awaiting the verdict of 32 million spork-wielding food critics. How will often-finicky schoolchildren react to increased fruits and vegetables; more whole grains; reduced amounts of saturated fat, trans fat, and sodium; and no more whole milk, among other changes? Influencing the outcome will require a sizable stick, served up with the carrots. If children don't include a fruit or vegetable with their lunch, they will either have to pay full price for it or not eat at all, according to new rules from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which administers the National School Lunch Program in 101,000 schools.
FOOD
February 5, 2016 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
We have seen the future of food and it's served in a bowl, on top of rice, along with an attractive arrangement of brightly colored vegetables, garnishes, and sauce. It's nutritious, it's cheap, it's bursting with flavor and texture: The rice bowl is everything. "It's a way of eating that's been around for 2,000 years," says David Katz, culinary director of HoneyGrow restaurants, now with seven locations in the region. "People around the world find rice comforting - it's like soul food.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013
DID YOU know you could save anywhere from $500 to $1,000 a year by growing your own vegetables? They will be fresher and tastier than store-bought, too. And you don't need a huge plot of land; many varieties can be grown in containers. My lovely mother-in-law, who has a green thumb and a wonderful vegetable garden of her own, has agreed to school me on the fine art of home-growing fruits and vegetables. Here are the five I plan to start with: 1. CUCUMBERS A good source of B vitamins.
NEWS
May 18, 2012 | By Sam Hananel, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Is it really more expensive to eat healthy? An Agriculture Department study released Wednesday found that most fruits, vegetables and other healthy foods cost less than foods high in fat, sugar and salt. That counters a common perception that it's cheaper to eat junk food than a nutritionally balanced meal. The government says it all depends on how you measure the price. If you compare the price per calorie - as some previous researchers have done - then higher-calorie pastries and snacks might seem like a bargain compared with fruits and vegetables.
NEWS
August 30, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
What it is: Sometimes one thing - perhaps a song or a place - can encapsulate an entire summer in one neat sensory keepsake. Maybe it's a meal in which tastes and textures converge to create a bit of summer bliss on a plate - like the broiled Atlantic flounder with Jersey Fresh vegetables served at the Oyster Creek Inn in Leeds Point. Chef Scott Kuppel says the rustic restaurant, at the edge of a salt marsh, usually begins serving the fish dish in June, just when delectable Jersey-grown veggies such as sweet corn, tomatoes, and spinach are coming into season.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2016 | By Kimberly Garrison
RAW AND VEGAN lifestyles have finally gone mainstream. In fact, some might even say they are the newest epicurean delight. That's right: Move over bacon, and so long Wheaties, there's a new breakfast of champions in town. From the hills of Hollywood to the bodegas of Manhattan, everyday folks are clamoring for smoothies, raw juices, tofu wraps, and raw energy balls. There are many reasons more Americans are embracing various forms of vegetarianism, but at the heart of the matter is people's desire to eat cleaner, lighter, and healthier.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
LAST SUMMER, Blair Shaw, an attorney who lives in Brewerytown, regularly walked his dog, Bailey, past a dense weed jungle on Master Street near 27th, unaware that in 2011 it had been Marathon Farm, an oasis of veggies in an urban food desert. Its motto: "Spreading the Love: one carrot at a time!" But by 2013, the Marathon Grill restaurant chain, which had cleared the third-of-an-acre lot and created Marathon Farm with such high hopes, suffered financial setbacks and pulled out. By last summer, the raised wood-frame beds had deteriorated and disappeared in the tall weeds, leaving no clue of their brief "one carrot at a time" history.
FOOD
July 5, 2013 | By Joe Yonan, Washington Post
It was one of the first pasta dinners I made after my sister and brother-in-law announced they were going vegan. We were in their kitchen in southern Maine, where I spent last year helping them with their homestead, and I was making a sauce from the best of the early summer produce, right from the huge garden outside. It was based on the classic French side dish of braised lettuce and peas, but I turned it Italian by tossing it with curly pasta and a touch of mint. As it neared readiness, I needed to make ask them to make one - OK, two - little exceptions to their diet in service of the dish and its integrity.
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