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Vegetables

NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Dan Meyers, For The Inquirer
Coming soon to a minor-league ball game near you: Broccoli. Days after a national physicians group renewed its push to get the Phillies' triple-A affiliate, the Lehigh Valley IronPigs, to include vegetables on its pork-laden stadium menu, the team has agreed to add the green stalk. But there's a catch. Bacon is involved, and, it turns out, some national publicity as well for the IronPigs' response. The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM), a nonprofit based in Washington, asked the team Monday to go easy on the bacon and other processed meat, which the group said is unhealthy, and get some vegetables on fans' plates.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Personal chef Christopher Lee Abbott, also known as Chef Kristov, is passionate about healthy, tasty cuisine - even working two acres of farmland on a co-op in Delaware to cultivate fresh ingredients to use in his dishes. Born and raised in Philadelphia, Abbott, 49, learned to cook from watching his grandmother in the kitchen. He also worked alongside Keven Parker back when Parker was his neighbor and operating a catering business from his basement before opening Ms. Tootsie's Restaurant Bar and Lounge on South Street.
FOOD
June 9, 2011 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
One in an occasional series on the demand for locally grown food and its impact on our region. A decade ago, it was de rigueur to augment the description of a dish on a restaurant menu with the name of the farm that provided the precious ingredients. But when Wendy's (yes, the burger chain) declares it has followed "the farm-to-table philosophy from the get-go," you know the food movement has shifted from its core. We've gone way beyond farm-to-table. Now it's not good enough for a chef to buy from a local farm.
NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Chester police raided a former drugstore in May 2011, what they found gave new meaning to the term high tech. In the basement was a hydroponic marijuana farm of serious sophistication. Nearly 100 pot plants, from seedlings to lush, 4-foot bushes, flourished in large tubs of water. Faux sunshine from dozens of commercial-grade grow lights powered by industrial generators shone down on a crop worth at least $43,000. The confiscated equipment typically would have sat in a warehouse until it could be auctioned or destroyed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013
DID YOU know you could save anywhere from $500 to $1,000 a year by growing your own vegetables? They will be fresher and tastier than store-bought, too. And you don't need a huge plot of land; many varieties can be grown in containers. My lovely mother-in-law, who has a green thumb and a wonderful vegetable garden of her own, has agreed to school me on the fine art of home-growing fruits and vegetables. Here are the five I plan to start with: 1. CUCUMBERS A good source of B vitamins.
NEWS
May 18, 2012 | By Sam Hananel, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Is it really more expensive to eat healthy? An Agriculture Department study released Wednesday found that most fruits, vegetables and other healthy foods cost less than foods high in fat, sugar and salt. That counters a common perception that it's cheaper to eat junk food than a nutritionally balanced meal. The government says it all depends on how you measure the price. If you compare the price per calorie - as some previous researchers have done - then higher-calorie pastries and snacks might seem like a bargain compared with fruits and vegetables.
FOOD
December 29, 2011 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
We've seen farm-to-family, farm-to-school, even farm-to-office programs. Now it's time for farm-to-freezer. Winter Sun Farm Greater Philadelphia ( wintersunfarmsgp.com ) is the region's first farm-to-freezer Community Supported Agriculture program. Launched by Adam and Sara Gordon of Doylestown, the December-through-April CSA offers once-a-month pick-up at locations in Philadelphia, Elkins Park, Swarthmore, Newtown, Doylestown, and Ottsville in Pennsylvania and Collingswood and Stockton, Hunterdon County, in New Jersey.
FOOD
July 5, 2013 | By Joe Yonan, Washington Post
It was one of the first pasta dinners I made after my sister and brother-in-law announced they were going vegan. We were in their kitchen in southern Maine, where I spent last year helping them with their homestead, and I was making a sauce from the best of the early summer produce, right from the huge garden outside. It was based on the classic French side dish of braised lettuce and peas, but I turned it Italian by tossing it with curly pasta and a touch of mint. As it neared readiness, I needed to make ask them to make one - OK, two - little exceptions to their diet in service of the dish and its integrity.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2012 | Beth D'Addono
HALF THE FUN of being on vacation is changing the routine, especially when it comes to meals. Follow these tips from healthydiningfinder.com to be sure all that road food doesn't turn you into a wide load. Choose dishes flavored with herbs and spices instead of rich sauces, gravies or dressings. If you order sauces, ask for them on the side and go easy. It's all about portion sizes, even when it comes to healthy meals at restaurants. Share an entrée along with an added salad or side, or take a portion of the meal to go. Order a dinner salad or broth-based soup to help fill up before your main course.
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Schools here and throughout America will begin serving healthier meals with the start of the academic year, and everyone is awaiting the verdict of 32 million spork-wielding food critics. How will often-finicky schoolchildren react to increased fruits and vegetables; more whole grains; reduced amounts of saturated fat, trans fat, and sodium; and no more whole milk, among other changes? Influencing the outcome will require a sizable stick, served up with the carrots. If children don't include a fruit or vegetable with their lunch, they will either have to pay full price for it or not eat at all, according to new rules from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which administers the National School Lunch Program in 101,000 schools.
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