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Vegetables

NEWS
April 19, 2012 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Upscale veg­an eateries in the Philadelphia area have a dirty lit­tle se­cret: "I'd say at least two-thirds of our cli­en­tele are not veg­e­tar­i­an," says Ross Olchvary, chef-own­er at New Hope's Sprig & Vine . "I think most of them are just looking for some­thing dif­fer­ent. " Rich Lan­dau, chef and co-own­er of Center City's Vedge , with his wife, Kate Jacoby, has observed a sim­i­lar pat­tern. "With so many celebrities like Bill Clin­ton, Mike Ty­son, and El­len De­Gen­er­es talking about eating veg­an, peo­ple re­al­ize that it's not just some cleanse, and it's not some hip­pie-dip­py diet of steamed beans and len­til loaf.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | BY SUSAN SELASKY, McClatchy-Tribune News Services
IF YOU'VE resolved to eat more healthfully in 2014, think soup. It's filling and, when made with the right ingredients, can make you feel better by the bowlful. "There is research that suggests that when you have a bowl of soup before a meal you consume fewer calories" because the fluid helps you feel more full, said Bethany Thayer, registered dietitian nutritionist and news-media spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. You need only look to the latest food trends for soup-recipe inspiration.
FOOD
April 18, 2013 | By W. Wayt Gibbs, Associated Press
Nothing is more frustrating than finding the perfect cucumber or head of lettuce at the farmers' market, paying top dollar for it, and then tossing it out a week later when it has gone moldy or slimy in the refrigerator. No doubt, one reason so many of us eat too many convenience foods and too few fruits and vegetables is that it can be hard to get our busy schedules in sync with the produce we bring home. Food scientists, however, have discovered a remarkably effective way to extend the life of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables by days or even a week.
FOOD
December 29, 2011 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
We've seen farm-to-family, farm-to-school, even farm-to-office programs. Now it's time for farm-to-freezer. Winter Sun Farm Greater Philadelphia ( wintersunfarmsgp.com ) is the region's first farm-to-freezer Community Supported Agriculture program. Launched by Adam and Sara Gordon of Doylestown, the December-through-April CSA offers once-a-month pick-up at locations in Philadelphia, Elkins Park, Swarthmore, Newtown, Doylestown, and Ottsville in Pennsylvania and Collingswood and Stockton, Hunterdon County, in New Jersey.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2012 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
  WHEN first lady Michelle Obama launched her Let's Move! initiative in February 2010, it brought attention to school lunches, food deserts in urban neighborhoods and the rise in obesity, particularly among children and the poor. Among the results so far has been a campaign to make locally grown and healthy foods available in all communities, including city neighborhoods with few fresh-food resources. Change often comes slowly and, to paraphrase the adage, you may be able to lead the horse to an organic carrot, but you can't necessarily make it eat it. Mary Seton Corboy, founder of Greensgrow, Philadelphia's most successful urban farm, has been vocal about her frustration that her Kensington neighbors have been reluctant to give up their corner-store calories and opt in to Greensgrow's fresh and local fare.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2011 | By DAN GERINGER, geringd@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
PUTTING HIS money where his dream is, Marathon Restaurants CEO Cary Borish is investing $100,000 to turn a long-vacant, blighted Brewerytown lot into Marathon Farm, which will supply his six Philadelphia eateries with fresh vegetables and feed the residents of a neighborhood that has seen its share of hard times. Although the third-of-an-acre lot on the corner of 27th and Master streets is still bordered by the ancient redbrick walls of a city warehouse that collapsed 20 years ago, Borish watched happily Sunday as blight gave way to beautiful on its way to bountiful.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2013 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: I'm a new mom of a pretty fun but challenging 6-month-old boy. I am a naturally decisive person; however, the anxiety I'm feeling over making the "right" decisions or providing him the "right" things has been difficult to cope with. For example, since I've gone back to work, I haven't been able to pump enough milk and I've needed to start supplementing with formula. I intellectually know this is fine and many babies have formula, but for some reason I'm beating myself up over it. Why can't I produce enough milk, why can't I provide what I'm supposed to for him, etc.?
NEWS
June 3, 2011 | By Mary Clare Jalonick, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - There's a new U.S. symbol for healthful eating: The Agriculture Department unveiled "My Plate" on Thursday, abandoning the food pyramid that had guided many Americans but merely confused others. The new guide is divided into four different-sized quadrants, with fruits and vegetables taking up half the space and grains and protein making up the other half. The vegetables and grains portions are the largest of the four. Gone are the old pyramid's references to sugars, fats, or oils.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
CSAs, short for community supported agriculture, help farmers finance their growing expenses while offering participants great, fresh produce at peak season. Inna Spivakova and her boyfriend, Dan Manders, have been members of the Greensgrow CSA for three years now. They chose it because, while Greensgrow is an urban farm in Kensington, the CSA, started in 2002, is stocked by area farmers (more than 50 within 150 miles, according to its website). They also liked the option of getting a half share every other week, instead of weekly.
FOOD
June 9, 2011 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
One in an occasional series on the demand for locally grown food and its impact on our region. A decade ago, it was de rigueur to augment the description of a dish on a restaurant menu with the name of the farm that provided the precious ingredients. But when Wendy's (yes, the burger chain) declares it has followed "the farm-to-table philosophy from the get-go," you know the food movement has shifted from its core. We've gone way beyond farm-to-table. Now it's not good enough for a chef to buy from a local farm.
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