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Vegetables

FOOD
February 5, 2016 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
We have seen the future of food and it's served in a bowl, on top of rice, along with an attractive arrangement of brightly colored vegetables, garnishes, and sauce. It's nutritious, it's cheap, it's bursting with flavor and texture: The rice bowl is everything. "It's a way of eating that's been around for 2,000 years," says David Katz, culinary director of HoneyGrow restaurants, now with seven locations in the region. "People around the world find rice comforting - it's like soul food.
FOOD
January 29, 2016 | By Jill P. Capuzzo, For The Inquirer
For many of us living in the cold climes of the Northeast, the start of the year presents something of a consumption conundrum. We vow to knock off those extra pounds racked up from our holiday indulgences and promise we'll stick to our New Year's resolutions to eat more healthily. Meanwhile, the low temperatures and shorter days find us desperately craving hearty dishes filled with carbohydrates and fats. Scientific studies support our comfort food urges: everything from how the body takes more time to break down foods dense in calories, thereby releasing a steady flow of energy to stave off the cold, to the psychological response to seasonal affective disorder that has us reaching for mac and cheese or chicken pot pie to overcome the gloom from lack of daylight.
FOOD
October 9, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Brian Sirhal and Tim Spinner - the duo behind the Mexican trio of Cantina Feliz, La Calaca Feliz, and Taqueria Feliz - are spinning pizzas with their new suburban project, Pizzeria Felici . Pizzeria Felici (see what they did with the name?) is in the Elements Horsham at 303 Horsham Rd. (215-323-4530). Specialty is Neopolitan-style pizza cooked in a double-hearthed, wood-fired oven. Menu, designed by chef Jim Burke (ex-James), includes starters/antipasti, pastas, and entrees. Michael Brenfleck, last at La Calaca Feliz in Fairmount, is chef.
NEWS
August 30, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
What it is: Sometimes one thing - perhaps a song or a place - can encapsulate an entire summer in one neat sensory keepsake. Maybe it's a meal in which tastes and textures converge to create a bit of summer bliss on a plate - like the broiled Atlantic flounder with Jersey Fresh vegetables served at the Oyster Creek Inn in Leeds Point. Chef Scott Kuppel says the rustic restaurant, at the edge of a salt marsh, usually begins serving the fish dish in June, just when delectable Jersey-grown veggies such as sweet corn, tomatoes, and spinach are coming into season.
FOOD
August 14, 2015
Grain bowls like Jessica Koslow makes are incredibly adaptable. You can use almost anything in your kitchen, if you apply a little good sense and keep in mind a few basic rules. First, of course, comes the grain. Koslow prefers rice, like the brown rice grown in California by Koda Farms: "It's so healthy and it tastes so good. It's brown but not too brown. " But you can use any other cooked whole grain, such as farro, barley or quinoa. The grain has to be well-seasoned. Koslow dresses the rice in her bowls with both butter for body and an acid for tartness.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
LAST SUMMER, Blair Shaw, an attorney who lives in Brewerytown, regularly walked his dog, Bailey, past a dense weed jungle on Master Street near 27th, unaware that in 2011 it had been Marathon Farm, an oasis of veggies in an urban food desert. Its motto: "Spreading the Love: one carrot at a time!" But by 2013, the Marathon Grill restaurant chain, which had cleared the third-of-an-acre lot and created Marathon Farm with such high hopes, suffered financial setbacks and pulled out. By last summer, the raised wood-frame beds had deteriorated and disappeared in the tall weeds, leaving no clue of their brief "one carrot at a time" history.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | BY ANNIE PALMER, Daily News Staff Writer palmera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
IT WAS 2011. Outside City Hall were rows of tents where many flavors of political persuasion could be found - anarchists, communists, Democratic socialists, libertarians. This was Occupy Philadelphia, or, as Dusty Hinz remembers it, a "great coming-out party for the general left. " Amid the monthslong protests, a splinter group of twentysomethings formed with a plan to sustain the protests' energy in a way that would bring real change to city neighborhoods. Dubbed Occupy Vacant Land, the group of guerrilla gardeners squatted on dozens of vacant, garbage-strewn properties.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2015 | By Sally McCabe, For The Inquirer
Do some intensive vegetable gardening. There's a long weekend ahead, and, hopefully, you'll spend part of it in the garden. Keep cool-season greens picked, and as they go to seed, get ready to do that last harvest before composting the remains, or turning them under along with some well-rotted compost. Do some succession planting: Plant a few rows of squash or beans, but save some room to put in another planting of the same thing in two weeks. This theoretically spreads out the harvest over a longer time, although, in reality, it will all come in while you're on vacation.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew Olson, a horticulturist and co-owner of Farm 51, a West Philadelphia vegetable garden, spends his days navigating all the familiar obstacles that come with farming on vacant lots: limited water access, soil contamination, land tenure, and security concerns. But these days his harvest is fewer turnips, more tulips. Last fall, he and business partner Erica Maust launched Chicory, an urban flower farm and design studio on two quarter-acre parcels, one in West Philadelphia and another in Roxborough.
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Dan Meyers, For The Inquirer
Coming soon to a minor-league ball game near you: Broccoli. Days after a national physicians group renewed its push to get the Phillies' triple-A affiliate, the Lehigh Valley IronPigs, to include vegetables on its pork-laden stadium menu, the team has agreed to add the green stalk. But there's a catch. Bacon is involved, and, it turns out, some national publicity as well for the IronPigs' response. The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM), a nonprofit based in Washington, asked the team Monday to go easy on the bacon and other processed meat, which the group said is unhealthy, and get some vegetables on fans' plates.
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