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Vegetables

NEWS
January 16, 2015 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
CAVEMEN had all the time in the world. Those single-minded Homo sapiens didn't have to worry about multitasking or time clocks. Which is why weary home cooks following a gluten-free diet - or simply trying to feed their families fresh, healthful food - may say "paleo-schmaleo" when trying to follow in our ancestors' knuckle-dragging steps. The much-hyped paleo diet - or lifestyle, if you will - tosses out the agricultural products incorporated into the human diet over the past, say, 10,000 years in favor of a whole-foods approach to eating meat, plants and seafood that dates back to cave-dwelling days.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2015
DAWN ROBERTS is sizzling hot. She's not afraid to show off her buff new body - and she's ready to share how she got it! The 45-year-old West Philadelphia native, co-owner of KD Communications Group, skillfully juggled career, marriage and motherhood for years while always making fitness a priority. She was fit, for sure, but had grown frustrated about her weight. The former long-distance high-school track athlete and former ambassador for Black Girls Run had come to a crossroads: She'd been "running consistently for five years, and I was not getting faster and hadn't lost a pound.
FOOD
August 22, 2014 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
One of summer's greatest culinary pleasures is food cooked on a grill, with backyard flames enhancing flavors like nothing else. But fire and hot coals can transform so much more than just burgers and dogs. Almost all the produce bursting from local farms and gardens can be cooked outside - creating flavorful fare from appetizers through desserts. Grilled whole, sliced, layered or wrapped, almost every vegetable and many fruits can be converted into tasty fare on a barbecue grill.
FOOD
May 9, 2014 | By Jill P. Capuzzo, For The Inquirer
Among the many things I thank my mother for was her sense of resourcefulness. Her Scots-Irish heritage taught her never to waste anything, so when it came to food preparation, this meant taking advantage of whatever grew wild outside. In summer, she'd strip clean the blackberry bushes that grew along the driveway of our Connecticut house. In the fall, we'd climb the gnarly apple and pear trees in our back yard to shake a bounty loose. But in spring, it was all about rhubarb. Every May, my sisters and I would wait for those sprouts of magenta to push up from winter's carpet of brown leaves and pine needles in the woods behind our house.
FOOD
April 18, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
It's not enough to get kids to just fork down their vegetables. I want them to embrace carrots and onions and peas, to get excited about green beans and sweet potatoes and beets. So my plan for the fourth cooking class at Henry Lawton Elementary School was to take familiar vegetables and prepare them in an unfamiliar way. I chose a soup made with onion, carrots, and sweet potatoes to demonstrate how different vegetables can feel in your mouth when made a certain way, in this case, all blended together; and how different they can taste when seasoned with spices, in this case curry and paprika.
FOOD
April 4, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Even before the others had shed their backpacks and donned their aprons, Nick Rodriguez, 10, was smashing a clove of garlic, slamming his fist on the flat side of a knife, at our second cooking class at Henry Lawton Elementary. Yes, he said, without looking up, he had already peeled it. "Hey! I want a turn!" said Christian McKinney, 11, feeling like he was missing out. "Hang on, guys," I said. While I was thrilled with the enthusiasm and the smashing skill retained from class the week before, I wanted to remind them to read the entire recipe before plowing in. So each took a turn reading part of the instructions for tortelloni minestrone soup (we substituted the smaller tortellini)
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
AS THEY say, history repeats itself. For Marlise Gross, of Cherry Hill, history got a little update from the Web. When Gross was a youngster, her parents were members of a gourmet dinner club. "When it was my parents' turn to host, my mom would pore over Bon Appetit magazine to select perfect recipes," she said. "It was a way for them to try new foods and learn new cooking techniques. " Today, Gross is part of an online cooking club that brings like-minded cooks together via the Internet to learn from each other.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | BY SUSAN SELASKY, McClatchy-Tribune News Services
IF YOU'VE resolved to eat more healthfully in 2014, think soup. It's filling and, when made with the right ingredients, can make you feel better by the bowlful. "There is research that suggests that when you have a bowl of soup before a meal you consume fewer calories" because the fluid helps you feel more full, said Bethany Thayer, registered dietitian nutritionist and news-media spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. You need only look to the latest food trends for soup-recipe inspiration.
FOOD
January 17, 2014 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
In the world of cooking, one chef's throwaways are the makings of another's sauce. This is especially true of vegetables, where tradition has guided what can sometimes seem like the arbitrary rules of keep and discard. "When you think about it, the first person to figure out how to eat an artichoke was a genius," says Michael Santoro, chef-owner of the Mildred in Bella Vista. "People were probably walking past those things for a while, and it took someone to look beyond that tough woody part to get what was inside.
FOOD
December 20, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
I knew I had a battle ahead of me for our next-to-last cooking class with fifth graders at Bayard Taylor Elementary School in North Philadelphia - and it wasn't with the kids. Throughout our lessons over the last nine weeks, we had been fighting with our electric oven and all its digital bells and whistles. The thing seemed to have a mind of its own; its ability to hold a consistent temperature was as unpredictable as a moody teenager. But I was determined to teach the kids this simple recipe for baked chicken thighs and potatoes because, with a working oven, it's such an easy family dinner - just prep and pop in the oven - and it appeals to even finicky eaters.
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