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Vegetables

NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Schools here and throughout America will begin serving healthier meals with the start of the academic year, and everyone is awaiting the verdict of 32 million spork-wielding food critics. How will often-finicky schoolchildren react to increased fruits and vegetables; more whole grains; reduced amounts of saturated fat, trans fat, and sodium; and no more whole milk, among other changes? Influencing the outcome will require a sizable stick, served up with the carrots. If children don't include a fruit or vegetable with their lunch, they will either have to pay full price for it or not eat at all, according to new rules from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which administers the National School Lunch Program in 101,000 schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2012 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
  WHEN first lady Michelle Obama launched her Let's Move! initiative in February 2010, it brought attention to school lunches, food deserts in urban neighborhoods and the rise in obesity, particularly among children and the poor. Among the results so far has been a campaign to make locally grown and healthy foods available in all communities, including city neighborhoods with few fresh-food resources. Change often comes slowly and, to paraphrase the adage, you may be able to lead the horse to an organic carrot, but you can't necessarily make it eat it. Mary Seton Corboy, founder of Greensgrow, Philadelphia's most successful urban farm, has been vocal about her frustration that her Kensington neighbors have been reluctant to give up their corner-store calories and opt in to Greensgrow's fresh and local fare.
NEWS
June 21, 2012 | Maureen Fitzgerald
2 pounds of top round beef 3 tablespoons mixed chopped fresh herbs (rosemary, thyme, oregano, or marjoram 1? teaspoons coarse salt, plus to taste for veggies 1 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper, plus to taste for veggies 4 medium-size Idaho potatoes, scrubbed but not peeled 2 zucchini, washed 4 carrots, washed and peeled 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided use 2 tablespoons butter 2 tablespoons milk...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2012 | Beth D'Addono
HALF THE FUN of being on vacation is changing the routine, especially when it comes to meals. Follow these tips from healthydiningfinder.com to be sure all that road food doesn't turn you into a wide load. Choose dishes flavored with herbs and spices instead of rich sauces, gravies or dressings. If you order sauces, ask for them on the side and go easy. It's all about portion sizes, even when it comes to healthy meals at restaurants. Share an entrée along with an added salad or side, or take a portion of the meal to go. Order a dinner salad or broth-based soup to help fill up before your main course.
NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Chester police raided a former drugstore in May 2011, what they found gave new meaning to the term high tech. In the basement was a hydroponic marijuana farm of serious sophistication. Nearly 100 pot plants, from seedlings to lush, 4-foot bushes, flourished in large tubs of water. Faux sunshine from dozens of commercial-grade grow lights powered by industrial generators shone down on a crop worth at least $43,000. The confiscated equipment typically would have sat in a warehouse until it could be auctioned or destroyed.
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | Stacey Burling
What does it take to get people to change unhealthy behavior? Some cynics would say nothing works, but researchers at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine got good results with Palm Pilots (OK, the study started five years ago), remote coaching, and money. A team led by Bonnie Spring, a health psychologist and professor of preventive medicine, worked with 204 people with bad eating and exercise habits. The study, published in last week's Archives of Internal Medicine, targeted specific behavior — eating too much saturated fat and too few fruits and vegetables, plus watching TV too much and exercising too little — that are associated with health problems and shorter lives.
NEWS
May 25, 2012 | By Richard Simon, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The notion that Congress could consider pizza a vegetable may be just too much to digest. The SLICE Act, for School Lunch Improvements for Children's Education, has been introduced in response to congressional action last fall ensuring that two tablespoons of tomato paste slathered on pizza could continue to be classified as a full vegetable serving in the federal school lunch program. "Pizza certainly has its place in school meals, but equating it with broccoli, carrots and celery seriously undermines this nation's efforts to support children's health and their ability to learn because of better school nutrition," Rep. Jared Polis (D., Colo.)
NEWS
May 18, 2012 | By Sam Hananel, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Is it really more expensive to eat healthy? An Agriculture Department study released Wednesday found that most fruits, vegetables and other healthy foods cost less than foods high in fat, sugar and salt. That counters a common perception that it's cheaper to eat junk food than a nutritionally balanced meal. The government says it all depends on how you measure the price. If you compare the price per calorie - as some previous researchers have done - then higher-calorie pastries and snacks might seem like a bargain compared with fruits and vegetables.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With all his talk about sugar cane, corn, casaba, and fungi, Jeff White sounded like someone with a food obsession. But the ingredients he enumerated during an interview last week had to do with manufacturing, not a meal. His is an unconventional view of the world, where vegetables and other crops are the base materials for such durable goods as cellphone covers, DVD trays, and shipping containers. But the success of Ecospan L.L.C., the bioplastics company he now leads that aims to replace petroleum-based plastics with those made from natural resources, depends on White's perspective becoming widely held by consumers.
NEWS
April 19, 2012 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Upscale veg­an eateries in the Philadelphia area have a dirty lit­tle se­cret: "I'd say at least two-thirds of our cli­en­tele are not veg­e­tar­i­an," says Ross Olchvary, chef-own­er at New Hope's Sprig & Vine . "I think most of them are just looking for some­thing dif­fer­ent. " Rich Lan­dau, chef and co-own­er of Center City's Vedge , with his wife, Kate Jacoby, has observed a sim­i­lar pat­tern. "With so many celebrities like Bill Clin­ton, Mike Ty­son, and El­len De­Gen­er­es talking about eating veg­an, peo­ple re­al­ize that it's not just some cleanse, and it's not some hip­pie-dip­py diet of steamed beans and len­til loaf.
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