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Vegetables

FOOD
April 18, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
This is the sixth in a series on healthy cooking classes at St. Martin De Porres School in North Philadelphia. Maliyah Gregg was first to arrive and was hoping for a private lesson: "If I'm the only one, do I get to do everything myself?" she asked. Moments later the rest of the troops showed up and her face fell. Not only did Hope Wescott, Jayla Reeves, and Kayla Reid come, but also Chamya Davis, 11, a new student. Mariah Bey did not. She was absent last week too, and it turns out her family moved out of the area because of an emergency.
FOOD
April 18, 2013 | By W. Wayt Gibbs, Associated Press
Nothing is more frustrating than finding the perfect cucumber or head of lettuce at the farmers' market, paying top dollar for it, and then tossing it out a week later when it has gone moldy or slimy in the refrigerator. No doubt, one reason so many of us eat too many convenience foods and too few fruits and vegetables is that it can be hard to get our busy schedules in sync with the produce we bring home. Food scientists, however, have discovered a remarkably effective way to extend the life of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables by days or even a week.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013
DID YOU know you could save anywhere from $500 to $1,000 a year by growing your own vegetables? They will be fresher and tastier than store-bought, too. And you don't need a huge plot of land; many varieties can be grown in containers. My lovely mother-in-law, who has a green thumb and a wonderful vegetable garden of her own, has agreed to school me on the fine art of home-growing fruits and vegetables. Here are the five I plan to start with: 1. CUCUMBERS A good source of B vitamins.
FOOD
March 29, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Mariah Bey was the first to arrive in the kitchen for our third cooking lesson. "Hellooooo," she crooned, throwing her arms wide open to announce herself. "What are we cooking today?" "Omelets," I said. "And you get to decide what to put in. I have lots of choices: mushrooms, peppers, greens, cheese, tomatoes. And we're also going to dye eggs for Easter. " "We're going to dye eggs!" she cried, her eyes filling with excitement. "This is the best cooking class ever!" I've been cooking once a week with fifth- and sixth-grade girls from St. Martin de Porres school in North Philadelphia, with the goal of improving not only their culinary skills but also their nutrition with easy meals they can make themselves.
FOOD
December 28, 2012 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Sometimes the best-laid plans are last-minute plans. Before all the comings and goings of this holiday week are done, extend one last invitation to friends and family. An impromptu gathering at your home is by definition informal, and relieves you of the obligation to have every detail covered. With even a semi-stocked larder, you can invite folks on New Year's Eve to join you for brunch on New Year's Day. The loose time frame of an open-house invitation lets people drop in, or settle in. Spanning either lunch or dinner, the food to offer will shift accordingly.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012
Company description: "Herb infused savory waffle, red bell peppers, red onions, zucchini, portobello mushrooms, yellow squash, mozzarella cheese, tomatoes, Dijon mustard. " Chain: Max Brenner. Calories: Because it has fewer than 15 locations, the chain isn't required to provide nutrition information. Location: 15th Street, just south of Walnut. Order time: About 10 minutes. Price: $14.95. Review: The fun, colorful, aromatic restaurant/chocolate store is a great dessert spot, and a new boss has tweaked the menu to add some lighter bites that leave room for sweet treats at the end. New on the menu this fall are a quintet of quirky waffle sandwiches, and although the Chain Gang would never in a bazillion years think to order a veggie sandwich in a restaurant that sells a Peanut Butter and Banana Chocolate Crepe ($12.95)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012
1 PARSNIPS This close cousin to carrots has a sweet, nutty flavor and a more nutritious punch, lots of vitamin K and 7 grams of fiber to boot. 2 DATES They may look ugly, but dates, especially Medjools, are one of the sweetest, most satisfying fruits. They contain calcium, sulfur, iron, potassium and magnesium. 3 STAR FRUIT A tropical, juicy fruit packed with vitamin C and a slimming 30 calories a serving. Give this good source of fiber a try as a garnish in your next fruit salad.
NEWS
October 5, 2012
Kids may not like it, but schools are on the right track with healthier lunch menus that serve up more fruits and vegetables and less junk food. Under nutritional standards that took effect this year, cafeterias must serve twice as many fruits and vegetables while limiting proteins and carbohydrates. High school students are restricted to a maximum of 850 calories. The healthier menu was pushed by first lady Michelle Obama as part of her Let's Move campaign to fight childhood obesity.
FOOD
October 4, 2012 | By Alison Ladman, Associated Press
It may seem odd to turn on the oven when making soup, but roasting really is what makes this soup so spectacular. Roasting the vegetables caramelizes them and brings out nutty flavors that enhance all the other ingredients. Feel free to throw in just about any other vegetables you have lurking in your crisper drawer. Roasted Vegetable Soup Makes 6 servings 2 large yellow onions,    cut into wedges 2 medium zucchini,    diced 2 medium summer    squash, diced 4 large carrots,    peeled and diced 2 medium potatoes,    peeled and diced 2 tablespoons vegeta-    ble or canola oil Salt and ground black    pepper 1/2 teaspoon ground    cumin 1 quart low-sodium    chicken or vegeta-    ble broth Sour cream or yogurt,    to serve Chopped fresh cilant-    ro or parsley, to serve 1. Heat the oven to 400 F. 2. In a large bowl, combine the onions, zucchini, summer squash, carrots, and potatoes.
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Schools here and throughout America will begin serving healthier meals with the start of the academic year, and everyone is awaiting the verdict of 32 million spork-wielding food critics. How will often-finicky schoolchildren react to increased fruits and vegetables; more whole grains; reduced amounts of saturated fat, trans fat, and sodium; and no more whole milk, among other changes? Influencing the outcome will require a sizable stick, served up with the carrots. If children don't include a fruit or vegetable with their lunch, they will either have to pay full price for it or not eat at all, according to new rules from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which administers the National School Lunch Program in 101,000 schools.
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