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Velcro

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NEWS
November 29, 1991 | By Louis R. Carlozo, Special to The Inquirer
The bar crowd presses up tightly as Miles Cruz, dressed in a baggy blue jump suit with thick black stripes, prepares to make his jump. Egged on by the club emcee, they count: "One . . . two . . . Three!" Cruz, 24, is on his way to becoming a new breed of barfly. He sprints across the dance floor toward a tiny trampoline. He bounces, somersaults and slams spread-eagle against a padded black wall. Is he hurt? No, just stuck. For those who have wondered what it's like to be Spiderman, Velcro jumping, which bowed Wednesday night at a Cherry Hill nightclub, has landed in the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Georges de Mestral, 82, the Swiss inventor of Velcro, has died, his wife said Sunday. Helen de Mestral said he died Thursday from complications of bronchitis and other lung problems. Velcro was conceived in 1941, when de Mestral came home from hunting and found burrs stuck to his pants. He examined the burrs under a microscope and found their surface to consist of little hooks. He developed a fastener using two fabric strips - one covered with tiny hooks, the other with a fuzzy web. By the mid-1950s he had sold the license around the world, and for 30 years lived on the royalties and profits, his wife said.
NEWS
May 6, 2013 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
When challenged, Gov. Christie sometimes yells like a Marine gunnery sergeant, calling reporters, citizens, and opponents alike stupid. Judging by his stratospheric poll ratings, voters love that shtick. He's "Jersey Strong. " And how often did former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell say something outrageous, such as opining in 2006 that many old people love casinos because they "lead very gray lives"? After a brief flare, the outrage faded, as it always did; it was just Ed being Ed. Last week, Gov. Corbett mentioned in a radio interview that he had heard some employers say they have trouble finding workers who can pass a drug test - and for that moment of candor, he caught three days of hell, both from Democrats running to replace him in 2014 and from media commentators.
NEWS
May 8, 1995 | By Jeff Eckhoff, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Bucks County man who hurled himself at a Velcro wall and didn't stick has sued the sports/entertainment center that owns it, charging that center employees failed to maintain "The Flytrap" properly. Bruce Oswald of Washington Crossing, who broke his right foot 18 months ago, filed suit in Montgomery County Court last week, claiming that the owners of Sportsland, a 62,000-square-foot indoor amusement park in Langhorne, "failed to properly maintain (their) Velcro wall and its component parts in a proper and safe manner.
NEWS
January 24, 1993 | By Jeff McGaw, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mike Brown left Lycoming College in Williamsport and set about his noble mission: to teach high school students about American history and government. But noble wasn't paying the bills. When Brown realized that people would pay money to drink his beer, wrestle bears he hired, and take flying leaps into a Velcro-covered wall he had erected, he found the solution to his money problems - and a pay raise that most social studies teachers only dream about. Brown, 35, and partners Bill Daley, 49; Mike Gallen, 30, and Ralph Lamarra, 29, are the owners of what soon will be Plymouth Township's newest nightclub, Brownie's Pub. It is scheduled to open in time for St. Patrick's Day celebrations.
NEWS
June 26, 1990 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / TODD BUCHANAN
IN A STICKY SITUATION during her lunch hour, Linda Brown of Turnersville tries the sensation of hanging on a Velcro wall. The 10-foot wall, part of a national anti-drunken-driving campaign, was set up yesterday at the Gallery in Center City. There, passersby were invited to don a Velcro suit, jump on a small trampoline and allow themselves to be stuck.
TRAVEL
October 23, 2011
Whether you want a bit of cushioning for yoga on the go or a compact ground cover for outdoor activities, the TMat Pro fits the, well, derriere. Measuring 21 by 29 inches, so it's not meant for lying full length, the neoprene mat rolls tightly into a bundle 6 inches wide and 4 inches in diameter, secured by an integrated Velcro strap. The quick-drying mat comes in neon colors and patterns and fits in a purse or carry-on bag. TMat Pro is $24.95 at www.tmatpro.com ; 866-759-2888.
NEWS
January 24, 1988
AH, VELCRO! DISABLED BID BUTTONS ADIEU "The outer limits of Velcro" (LifeStyle, Inquirer Magazine, Jan. 10) was fun to read. One point, however: Velcro trouser-flies are not unthinkable! There is one use of Velcro that escaped mention - namely, in clothing for the disabled. My husband, who has multiple sclerosis, also has a wardrobe of Esprit-type shirts and trousers. Every garment he purchases gets immediately and ruthlessly converted. You might enjoy excerpts from my poem, "Clothing for the Disabled," which was written from the point of view of the seamstress and laundress and which describes the inner limits of Velcro.
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
DOWNWARDLY MOBILE Will young adults in the United States be less affluent than their parents? Yes, says Lawrence Mishel, co-author of The State of Working America. Mishel, research director of the Economic Policy Institute in Washington, says the economic position of the typical young family deteriorated during the 1980s as a result of a fall in real wages, the shift in employment toward low-wage industries, the effects of large trade deficits, and the erosion of union membership.
TRAVEL
October 16, 2011
Hands-free toting of cellphones, keys, credit cards, cash, and other little items is not so easy without substantial pockets or bulky encumbrances such as shoulder bags or backpacks. Unless, that is, you are armed with the Armpocket, which straps around your bicep and has a touch-through window for controlling electronic devices on the move. The water-resistant, padded carrier comes in three sizes (the largest fits devices up to 5.5 inches long and 3.25 inches wide) and has internal pockets for keys and cards, an audio port for headphones, and a Velcro strap closure.
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TRAVEL
May 16, 2016
Soft, collapsible coolers save space when empty, but they crush under weight, and most of them leak. Hard coolers can be unwieldy space hogs. Happily, we can have the best of both chills with the hybrid Kelty Folding Cooler. The zipper-closure collapsible polyester frame is reinforced by a lightweight molded plastic top and bottom, as well as sturdy internal foam insulation panels that grip the cooler walls via Velcro, then fold down for storage. The result is a tough-enough semi-rigid cooler that folds down to an easily stashable five to six inches high, depending on the size.
NEWS
May 6, 2013 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
When challenged, Gov. Christie sometimes yells like a Marine gunnery sergeant, calling reporters, citizens, and opponents alike stupid. Judging by his stratospheric poll ratings, voters love that shtick. He's "Jersey Strong. " And how often did former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell say something outrageous, such as opining in 2006 that many old people love casinos because they "lead very gray lives"? After a brief flare, the outrage faded, as it always did; it was just Ed being Ed. Last week, Gov. Corbett mentioned in a radio interview that he had heard some employers say they have trouble finding workers who can pass a drug test - and for that moment of candor, he caught three days of hell, both from Democrats running to replace him in 2014 and from media commentators.
TRAVEL
October 23, 2011
Whether you want a bit of cushioning for yoga on the go or a compact ground cover for outdoor activities, the TMat Pro fits the, well, derriere. Measuring 21 by 29 inches, so it's not meant for lying full length, the neoprene mat rolls tightly into a bundle 6 inches wide and 4 inches in diameter, secured by an integrated Velcro strap. The quick-drying mat comes in neon colors and patterns and fits in a purse or carry-on bag. TMat Pro is $24.95 at www.tmatpro.com ; 866-759-2888.
TRAVEL
October 16, 2011
Hands-free toting of cellphones, keys, credit cards, cash, and other little items is not so easy without substantial pockets or bulky encumbrances such as shoulder bags or backpacks. Unless, that is, you are armed with the Armpocket, which straps around your bicep and has a touch-through window for controlling electronic devices on the move. The water-resistant, padded carrier comes in three sizes (the largest fits devices up to 5.5 inches long and 3.25 inches wide) and has internal pockets for keys and cards, an audio port for headphones, and a Velcro strap closure.
NEWS
August 8, 2010
Getting around on crutches while traveling can be a formidable challenge. And then there's the problem of keeping essentials handy when your hands are occupied with the crutches. Thank goodness for Crutch Tote , a long, narrow pouch with two deep pockets that straps onto a crutch via Velcro closures, providing an instant hands-free carry bag. The top pocket is deep enough to hold a magazine, newspaper, or maps, and both pockets have room for wallets, sunglasses, snacks, and even a water bottle.
LIVING
April 28, 2010 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How do the Nerd Guys do it? John Young and Randy Schmidt, computer geeks with enough ideas to fill 1,000 gigabytes, appear to have the (Web) master touch that turns a totally goofy idea into solid gold - or embroidered patches. Or beef jerky business cards. Or gorilla suits. In recent years, Young, 39, and Schmidt, 28 - plus a buddy or two - have conjured kookiness, made it happen, and hit the spot. Usually, it's all about them. When the two West Chester-based Web-design consultants-by-day notice the lack of something, they don't just wish for it like most cubicle rats - they start writing code.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2008 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
Whooshing around in corduroy pants may be loud, but wait till you hear David Parker and Jeffrey Kazin dancing in Velcro suits. Parker and his Bang Group, appearing this weekend at the Painted Bride, open the show with a 2002 piece called Slapstuck. Melanie Rozema and Jeroen Teunnissen designed the costumes that launched the piece to win a Bessie Award. Schoolyard hand games and ripping Velcro riffs provide the percussive soundscape. I once asked my husband why athletes do those high-jumping belly bumps.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2005 | By CATHERINE LUCEY luceyc@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report. Catherine Lucey is filling in for Howard Gensler, who is on vacation
LINDSEY LOHAN is no daddy's girl. The tabloid-friendly actress with the flaming hair and trailer park home life tells W Magazine that her deadbeat dad shouldn't get any of her money. "He didn't do anything for my career except go out and not come home at night," the 18-year-old actress-singer says in the April issue, out today. "So I don't think he deserves anything. He doesn't even deserve my respect. " After Lindsay's mom Dina filed divorce papers in January, Michael Lohan said he wanted half of the 15 percent his daughter allegedly gives her mother - which could be around $6 million to $7 million a year, his lawyer has said.
NEWS
November 1, 2004 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
David Parker and the Bang Group shared the headline with Philadelphia's Paule Turner, Duchess, at Community Education Center's New York Dance Exchange on Saturday. The program also included Karen Bernard and Alejandra Martorell, both New York-based artists. Parker's eclectic and elastic group tours the United States and Europe and is no stranger to Philadelphia audiences, having performed at the Annenberg's Harold Prince Theater. I do not recall, though, that they had to put up with the interference of a Halloween party upstairs, as they did at CEC. In Friends of Dorothy, Jeffrey Kazin offered the underwear-clad Parker pants and a shirt that turned out to match his own flower-embroidered cowboy shirt.
NEWS
August 18, 2000 | By Michelle Jeffery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As 90-year-old Irwin Brod began his doubles match at Thomas Williams Park, another group of tennis players retreated to the shady patio overlooking the courts. The topic of the conversation: cataract surgery. "Back in our 30s we used to talk about the girls," said Howard Segal, 77, of Elkins Park. "Now all we have to talk about is our health problems. " The wisecracks and self-deprecating wit are only a cover. As players trickled in on a recent morning, it was clear that these are some die-hard tennis players.
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