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ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1992 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The best thing about Kamikaze Hearts is probably its title, which aptly captures the repellent self-destructiveness of the film's main characters. A weird, unsatisfying blend of documentary and drama, Kamikaze Hearts is little more than lesbian porno film with an artsy veneer and philosophical pretensions. It tries to probe the ambiguous borders between fiction and fact, acting and being, particularly for women whose sexuality has become a means of production. But the film's formlessness and banal dialogue remind us of the power of art to shape and clarify experience.
REAL_ESTATE
July 9, 1993 | By Al Carrell, FOR THE INQUIRER
Fine furniture is often made from a core lumber covered with a thin layer of quality wood called veneer. The veneer is glued over the core lumber and, because it is so thin and brittle, it can be damaged by moisture problems or abuse. When the veneer comes unglued, it can be a problem. Once it has come loose, you need to glue it back in place soon or it will probably break off. If the glue has just failed and the veneer is simply loose, you can probably glue it back in place.
NEWS
August 12, 1994 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Borough Council last night passed an amendment that will save residents and the town money when they replace or repair sections of the 100-year-old stone river barrier known as the sea wall. A law that dates back to 1951 required that the wall be replaced only with stone and mortar, in keeping with its historic character. The nearly 5-foot- high retaining wall was included in the original design of the town more than 100 years ago, Councilman Edward Bridge said. The amendment, which was proposed by Bridge, allows a more economical alternative, he said, because the cost of complying with the old requirements is prohibitive.
LIVING
May 13, 2005 | By Michael Walsh FOR THE INQUIRER
From peasants' cottages to kings' castles, stone has been one of the more popular home-building materials for centuries - millennia, if you count ancient cave and cliff dwellings. But for eons, it was mostly regarded as an exterior material. Not today. Stone - in more or less its natural state, not cut and polished as in floor tile or countertops - is turning up in almost every room of the house. Yet most of it is anything but natural. It's the result of technology, not geology, and comes from the factory, not the quarry.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1991 | By Susan Q. Stranahan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania grows some of the finest hardwoods in the world. And that's precisely where much of the wood is going: to the world. Japanese buyers love the fine-grained black cherry that grows in abundance across the northern tier of Pennsylvania. The Germans have an insatiable appetite for red oak, prevalent in the state's Central Highlands. Visit a sawmill or log dealer in the hinterlands of Pennsylvania these days, and you're as likely to meet a buyer from Frankfurt or Fuji as one from Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 23, 2007 | By Joy Deangdeelert Cho, For the Inquirer
Blend soft elements with soothing ones and create the perfect setting for a cozy interlude. A modern update to the rocking chair takes form in the Monte Luca Glider ($895) and ottoman ($385). Available at Gene's, 122 E. Lancaster Ave. in Wayne, and www.shopgenes.com . Missoni's bright Fernando throws ($265 each) and cushions ($100 each) refresh the classic winter plaid. Available at Kellijane, 1721 Spruce St., 215-790-0233. Tummy ache? Drafty rooms? Cuddle up with this luxe hot-water bottle by Armand Diradourian ($150)
NEWS
March 10, 1994 | BY JUDITH TRUSTONE
Recent humbling encounters with the ice spirits have given us a relatively gentle taste of disaster to remind us of the suffering of our neighbors in Southern California, those living in Andrew's path, the tidal waves of Bangladesh and our very own recently flooded Midwest. Just as drive-by shootings have made us all pause before giving the finger to another motorist, severe weather and the crisis of violence have forced us into politeness that used to be an expression of good manners and concern for others.
NEWS
December 28, 1997 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Before Doug Mooberry moved his business to this hamlet, he spent some time shop-hopping, trying out various spaces, including one place that had no heat or plumbing. A cabinetmaker, Mooberry needs not only space; he has specific requirements. His custom 18th- and 19th-century-style furniture is made of rare woods, often massively carved with veneer inlays and special finishes that gleam like glass. Mooberry and his crew of 10 artisans can't work just anywhere, especially not in potentially damp areas.
NEWS
June 27, 2007
LAST WEEK, we asked for your opinion on the verdict that found Jeffrey Marsalis not guilty of the rapes he was charged with. Jeffrey Marsalis was acquitted of rape because the jury thought these women had alcohol and everyone knows the minute you have alcohol, sex crimes take on a veneer of reasonable doubt. The testimony indicated he probably drugged these women and did what he wanted with them. I don't think all of the victims just decided to press charges against him. Because of defense lawyers who portray people as willing particapnts just because they had a few drinks, he got off on the rape charges.
NEWS
September 3, 1993 | By Al Haas, INQUIRER AUTOMOTIVE WRITER
The hi-tech Infiniti Q45 has always been the most performance-minded of the large Japanese luxury cars. As a consequence, I have always found it the most fun to drive. With the 1994 model, the Q's designers have tried to retain that performance edge, while grazing with renewed vigor in the pastures of seamless luxury, pastures that had been owned by the Lexus LS400. Personally, I never saw the Q as lacking in civility, but marketing surveys showed the Infiniti brass that the big guy could do with a tad more couth and comfort.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 30, 2012 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
Scheduled for a September showroom debut, the extensively redesigned 2013 Mercedes-Benz GL turns out to be more than a superb sport ute. In the name of safety, comfort, saving petrol, on and off-road traction, and fording streams up to two feet deep, this largest and most costly of the Benz SUVs also proves a technological treasure trove. There's enough standard and optional hardware and software here to cause an UberGeek to OD. If the GL could stage an orgy attended by algorithms and artificial intelligence instead of decadent Romans, it would easily outdraw one of Caligula's mixers.
NEWS
July 29, 2012 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Any art museum that desires to attract adolescent males (that is, males up to the age of about 25) might follow the lead of the Allentown Art Museum and stage an exhibition like "At the Edge: Art of the Fantastic. " In a catalog statement, the museum's president and chief executive officer, J. Brooks Joyner, calls this extensive display of fantasy art "the first of its kind and scale to be undertaken by a museum of fine arts in America. " I can believe it, because art museums traditionally consider art of this kind to be beyond the pale - overtly commercial, lurid, and devoid of serious aesthetic character.
NEWS
October 2, 2009 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
"Much as I enjoy performing for the back of everyone's cell phones, let's make this a technology-free show," the blue-eyed soul singer Mayer Hawthorne asked the crowd at Johnny Brenda's on Wednesday night. He may have just been expressing a degree of annoyance at the way audiences have turned into a sea of glowing screens (a step more performers ought to take), but the demand was of a piece with Hawthorne's desire to cram the near-capacity crowd into an economy-size WABAC machine. Hawthorne's brand of easy, orchestrated soul is unabashedly revivalist.
NEWS
November 23, 2007 | By Joy Deangdeelert Cho, For the Inquirer
Blend soft elements with soothing ones and create the perfect setting for a cozy interlude. A modern update to the rocking chair takes form in the Monte Luca Glider ($895) and ottoman ($385). Available at Gene's, 122 E. Lancaster Ave. in Wayne, and www.shopgenes.com . Missoni's bright Fernando throws ($265 each) and cushions ($100 each) refresh the classic winter plaid. Available at Kellijane, 1721 Spruce St., 215-790-0233. Tummy ache? Drafty rooms? Cuddle up with this luxe hot-water bottle by Armand Diradourian ($150)
NEWS
June 27, 2007
LAST WEEK, we asked for your opinion on the verdict that found Jeffrey Marsalis not guilty of the rapes he was charged with. Jeffrey Marsalis was acquitted of rape because the jury thought these women had alcohol and everyone knows the minute you have alcohol, sex crimes take on a veneer of reasonable doubt. The testimony indicated he probably drugged these women and did what he wanted with them. I don't think all of the victims just decided to press charges against him. Because of defense lawyers who portray people as willing particapnts just because they had a few drinks, he got off on the rape charges.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2006 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a sprawling wind-blown lot behind his business headquarters, Hans-Peter Schlobach was in his element, surrounded by logs of all kinds. He knew every species of tree, where they came from and where they were going: the cherry to Austria; the white oak to Germany; the poplar to Italy and South Korea; the red oak to Taiwan; and walnut to Spain. "You see that," said Schlobach after spraying water on the end of a log to accentuate the light even rings. "That's a good log. We like it because of its consistency.
LIVING
September 22, 2006 | By Karla Klein Albertson FOR THE INQUIRER
Until now, America has not had a major exhibition of the Biedermeier style, which flourished in Germany and Austria between 1815 and 1830, right after the Congress of Vienna settled Napoleon's hash. The Milwaukee Art Museum will be the only U.S. venue for "Biedermeier: The Invention of Simplicity," a coup for the institution but not a surprising choice considering the great 19th-century German migration to that part of the country. Next year, the show travels to Vienna, Berlin, and the Louvre in Paris, so you'll have to save your travel pennies if you miss its 3 1/2-month run in Wisconsin.
NEWS
May 12, 2006 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The idolized have it rough. Russian baritone Dmitri Hvorostovsky, for example, drew an audience at his recital Wednesday at the Kimmel Center, much of it Russian-speaking, that was clearly as interested in his personality as his art. The audience tended toward intrusive, premature applause (even before he'd stopped singing) and, after intermission, received lots of calls to cell phones that hadn't been shut off. Hvorostovsky smiled indulgently. My guess is that he's had lots and lots of therapy to achieve that.
NEWS
October 7, 2005 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia judge yesterday gave owners of the shuttered Lewis Tower Building until Nov. 1 to stabilize its crumbling facade or lose control of the property to a court-appointed receiver. Common Pleas Court Judge Gary S. Glazer ruled after a 30-minute hearing, where a lawyer for the owner of a neighboring building said nothing had been done since Aug. 22, when a large piece of stone veneer from the 33-story tower fell through the roof of the former Bookbinders Seafood House at 215 S. 15th St. Since the incident, the city Department of Licenses and Inspections has closed both the landmark tower and the former Bookbinders - under renovation as an Applebee's restaurant - until the Lewis Tower's owners provide an engineer's report showing the facade is stable and neighboring buildings are safe.
SPORTS
June 30, 2005 | By Michael D. Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Tour de France begins on Saturday, which means Americans will be getting a full dose of Lance Armstrong on their TV screens for the next three weeks. They'll watch him zip through time trials, sweat his way up mountains, and plunge bravely down frightening descents that look a lot like ski slopes. And though the vast majority of Americans care not a bit for bicycle racing and probably couldn't tell you whether Greg LeMond rode a bike or played hockey, they'll pull for Armstrong to win his seventh straight Tour - not because he is a magnificent athlete who has dominated the world's toughest athletic event for so long but because he is the man who beat cancer.
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