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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1995 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The Merchant of Venice that Barry Edelstein has set on the stage of the Joseph Papp Public Theatre is one despairing view of human relations. The quarrels of the Montagues and Capulets are childish tantrums when set against the mutual hatred of Jews and Christians in this production, which betrays scarcely a hint of human feeling. You will search in vain here for more than a shred of decency in Ron Leibman's Shylock, Laila Robins' Portia, or any of the smarmy Christian men- about-the-canals who despise the Jewish moneylender and are despised by him in turn.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1986 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
In Luchino Visconti's Death in Venice (1971), a famous composer, Gustav von Aschenbach (based on Gustav Mahler, said to have inspired the Thomas Mann novella on which the movie is based), goes to Venice late in the season. An amethyst cloud of fog shrouds the city of canals, yet the grieving musician (who recently has buried his wife and children) sees a vision of ideal beauty. A young Polish lad named Tadzio haunts the composer, movingly played by Dirk Bogarde, who is aroused aesthetically and sexually out of his grief.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1994 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
When it comes to poetic brilliance, psychological depth, internal consistency and other such niceties, The Merchant of Venice may never crash the front rank of the Shakespearean canon. When it comes to telling a ripping good story, however, this early play about justice, mercy, privilege and prejudice can stand with the best of them - and Russell Treyz isn't about to let us forget it. Treyz has directed the Merchant that runs through July 30 at the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival here at Allentown College, and a first-rate Merchant it is. Deftly shuttling back and forth among the narrative's several intercut strains, Treyz achieves both a bracing pace and a gathering tension - a tension all the more effective for seldom raising its voice.
NEWS
February 2, 1992 | By Jim Finegan, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
If you're feeling fancy free Come wander through the world with me And any place we chance to be . . . - "Two for the Road" We had sat down at the Gran Caffe Chioggia, in the Piazzetta San Marco, with little more in mind than an after-dinner cup of coffee. But when we learned that the trio solicited requests, I asked if they could play "Two for the Road," an all-but-forgotten Henry Mancini song with those sweet, unpretentious lyrics by Leslie Bricusse. In moments the piano player was gently fingering the melody, and the bassist began to back him, tentatively.
NEWS
June 15, 1986 | By Samuel Hughes, Special to The Inquirer
The sky was a drizzle-threatening gray as my train crossed the long causeway that connects the Italian mainland to Venice. It's an ingress that often has been compared to the back-door entrance of a palace, but that morning it struck me as being more like a three-mile intravenous tube that the modern world was using to pump its rich diet of tourism into the fossilized body of the city. The weather wasn't a very cheery omen, particularly for someone as groggy and full of expectations as I. Venice can be resplendent in the sunshine, heart-breakingly melancholy in the fog, wild and romantic in a thunderstorm; but under a leaden sky of late fall, she takes on an expression that is at once pinched and sullen.
NEWS
April 19, 1992 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With an illustrious history that extends more than 1,200 years, Venice certainly lacks the ersatz quality of DisneyWorld, and with the stench of decay that pervades the canals, it is hardly a sparkling paragon. But before the opening of Euro Disney in France this month, Venice was the closest thing Europe had to America's giant amusement park - an unreal city-museum kept alive almost exclusively by tourism. THE BASICS. Once Europe's most powerful city-state, because of its north Adriatic location and mercantile expertise, Venice consists of about 120 little islands, surrounded by more than 175 canals and connected by 400 bridges, some of them architectural masterpieces.
NEWS
April 13, 1987 | By Jane Eisner, Inquirer Staff Writer
No longtime Venetian can forget the events of Nov. 4, 1966, when wind and water from the Adriatic Sea came crashing into this most improbable of cities and created the worst flood in living memory. The water on the ground floor of Gianni Zanon's house came up to the top of his legs. He had no electricity; power lines were too wet to carry electricity. Merchandise in the shops was soaked. The canals were so swollen that it was impossible to get to work - besides, his office was flooded.
NEWS
March 26, 1989 | By Mike Leary, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Is there anyone but must repress a secret thrill, on arriving in Venice for the first time . . . and stepping into a Venetian gondola? That singular conveyance, come down unchanged from ballad times, black as nothing else on earth except a coffin - what pictures it calls up of lawless, silent adventures . . . what visions of death itself, the bier and solemn rites and last soundless voyage. " - Thomas Mann, "Death in Venice" In a scruffy shed where two tiny canals intersect, master craftsman Romeo Crivellaro carefully chiseled a winged lion on the prow of a wooden boat with sinuous, asymmetrical curves - unmistakably, a gondola.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1999 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The Italian painter Giovanni Antonio Canal, known as Canaletto, is famous for his panoramic and highly detailed views of Venice, where he was born in 1697. It's not generally known that he also etched a suite of 30 views of Venice, nearby Padua and their environs - the only prints he is known to have made during his career. The Arthur Ross Gallery at the University of Pennsylvania has put on view a nearly complete set of Canaletto's etchings lent by the Arthur Ross Foundation. All but two of the 30 original prints and a fragment of a third (from a plate that was cut apart)
NEWS
March 7, 1999 | By Stu Bykofsky, FOR THE INQUIRER
What would you pay for a room with a view overlooking a canal? I paid more than I thought, and I'm talking more than cash. Since the city is built on islands, and since all of the space was gobbled up when the doges were the top dogs, the supply/demand equation drives room rates skyward. A less-than-glamorous three-star hotel charges 300,000 lire ($187) a night, and ours was, let's say, less than grand. I found and booked it by magic, through the Internet (which I don't understand)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, STAFF WRITER
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - There have been years when just hours after they steered their wooden motorboat across the Great Egg Harbor Bay from their dock in Somers Point to revel in Ocean City's Night in Venice proceedings - and perhaps even win a trophy for their decorating prowess in the annual boat parade - members of the Caserta family come up with the idea for next year's festivities. "It'll be the next day after Night in Venice and I'll hear a song on the radio and think, 'Yeah, that's a good song.
NEWS
March 25, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
For more than 25 years, Montclair, N.J.-born novelist Donna Leon's name has been inextricably connected to Venice, Italy, her adopted home and the setting of her wildly successful Commissario Brunetti mystery series. That is, until the tourists all but drove her out. "The city gets 30 million tourists a year. And only 58,000 people live there," Leon said Wednesday in a phone interview from Switzerland. "You can't walk down the street. " Leon, 73, is celebrating a milestone: the publication this month of the 25th Brunetti novel, The Waters of Eternal Youth , which has the commissario investigating a 15-year-old drowning case.
NEWS
March 6, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
WILMINGTON - Seldom does such a strong, complete vocal personality leap across the decades - full of steely confidence, haunting mystery, and emotional gravity - especially one attached to a name that's completely unknown. Mascia Predit was a Latvian soprano who retired to Wilmington before dying in 2001 in her 90s. Now, she unexpectedly reappears on disc, thanks to Philadelphia-area sound archivist Ward Marston - and thanks to a decade of work by friends whose devotion to her is very nearly unconditional.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elton John at war with Venice British singer and man about the world  Elton John  is at war with the mayor of Venice, Italy, where Sir Elton lives with hub  David Furnish  and their two sons,  Zachary  and  Elijah . Mayor  Luigi Brugnaro  angered the singer when Brugnaro pressured preschools in town to take away images and books that depict same-sex couples. Sir Elton says in an Instagram posting the mayor has "stupidly chosen to politicise children's books.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
MURAL ARTIST Eurhi Jones has turned the north wall of Bodine High School into a gigantic ocean wave, created a spectacular jungle on the exterior of the Philadelphia Zoo parking garage and painted a wildlife-rich "Walk Through a Pennsylvania Forest" at the Please Touch Museum. Now, she has turned her eye-popping palette and her passion for nature into a 10-block, 50-artworks trail that winds through her own neighborhood, Manayunk, and leads people to the new Venice Island Performing Arts & Recreation Center on the Schuylkill River.
NEWS
October 9, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's ambitious $2.4 billion, 25-year storm-water management program hinges on innovative practices such as porous pavement, green roofs, and rain gardens to soak up the first flows of rainfall. Anything to keep storm water from overwhelming the sewer system and overflowing into area rivers and streams, carrying road oil and litter and raw sewage with it. But, in the final analysis, sometimes you have to bring on the tank. On Tuesday, the city formally cut the ribbon on a $46 million project on Venice Island in Manayunk that includes a massive tank to hold the storm water and raw sewage that in an earlier time would have gushed into the Schuylkill during big storms.
NEWS
October 7, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
THE PHILADELPHIA Water Department needed to build a 4 million-gallon underground basin in Manayunk to capture stormwater and prevent sewers from overflowing into the Schuylkill. The city's Parks & Recreation Department and the Manayunk Development Corporation needed to replace the crumbling Venice Island playground with a performing-arts center to serve as a neighborhood cultural magnet. In the course of a few jaw-dropping minutes at a community meeting, a marriage was made between strange bedfellows.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
THE CELEBRITY-GOSSIP universe is getting over its hangover today. George Clooney is married. What do we do now? According to the Associated Press, the newlyweds (Clooney and civil-rights lawyer Amal Alamuddin ) emerged yesterday from the seven-star Aman Hotel (yeah, seven! Take that Motel 6) where they were married a day earlier. George, in a light-gray suit, sported a simple wedding band on his left hand. Amal, in a flouncy, white, short dress with pastel-colored appliques resembling flower blossoms, wore a thin band studded with what appeared to be roundish diamonds.
NEWS
September 28, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Venice's raison d'être: Clooney Since it was founded in A.D. 421, the glorious city of Venice has witnessed few events as monumental as George Clooney 's wedding to Amal Alamuddin , set for Monday at a 13th- century palazzo called Ca' Farsetti. Crowds cheered as the couple arrived Friday at the Cipriani hotel with friends Cindy Crawford and her hub Rande Gerber . A gaggle of other celebs arrived, too, including Matt Damon , Miguel Ferrer , Richard Kind , Ellen Barkin , and Gabriel Byrne . Ah Venice!
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
IF YOU'RE reading this, you now know for certain your invitation got lost in the mail. Don't feel alone. So did mine. As 150 who's whos of boldface names - apparently Angelina Jolie , Brad Pitt , Mrs. and Mr. Cindy Crawford , Andrea Bocelli and Bono , and, sigh, Matt Damon - gather in Venice, Italy, for the weekend-long (really long-weekend, not to mention long-awaited) wedding of one Mr. George Clooney to some Ms. Amal Alamuddin , you and Temporary Tattle have no choice but to register complaints to the U.S. Postal Service.
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