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Venison

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FOOD
July 1, 1998 | by Aliza Green, For the Daily News
Yo, Chefs! We were at the New Orleans Cafe in Eddystone and had the most interesting dish - venison chops with blueberry brandy butter sauce. Could you find out how the sauce was made? I've tried to make it, but this was totally different. Thanks for the help! Beverly Kokas, Aston Dear Beverly, Excellent Cajun and Creole food is served in this quaint, tiny restaurant. Owner/chef Daniel Funk learned his trade from a former chef at K. Paul's kitchen, Paul Prudhomme's world-famous New Orleans eatery.
FOOD
June 21, 1995 | by Phyllis Stein-Novack, Special to the Daily News
Ah, summer, The lazy days of cookouts and cool quick meals. Today, in recognition of the summer solstice, I'm going to fire up the outdoor grill, mix up a batch of barbecue sauce, toss a salad and cook venison. Venison? In the summertime? Even if you're a venison fan, you might not think of grilling it like London broil or stuffing leftovers into a sandwich because venison is associated with the hunting season, when it's cold outside. Or maybe you have been reluctant to try venison at all because you think it's tough and gamey.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2007 | By STEVE FROTHINGHAM, For the Associated Press
PLYMOUTH, N.H. - When Henry Ahern's first 27 red deer ambled off the trailer and onto his grandfather's farm 13 years ago, he was just looking for a way to save the 200 acres from developers. He'd considered farming cattle, elk, bison or even fish. But when he learned that the United States imported more than 3 million pounds of deer meat a year from New Zealand, he became convinced a niche domestic market could be created. He was right. Since he started Bonnie Brae Farms, farmed venison has become a fast-growing cottage industry fueled by strong interest in the low-fat, low-cholesterol meat with all the flavor but none of the gamy bitterness of its wild cousin.
FOOD
July 25, 1999 | By Frank Wilson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Coleen Williams' husband, Tom, doesn't miss his mom's meat loaf. "He always thought it tasted too mushy," Williams says. Not so his wife's - especially not since inspiration descended upon her during the Blizzard of '96. Williams, a self-described "adventurous cook," had braved the elements and trekked to the Italian Market from her home in Queen Village. "I was across the street from Sonny's," she recalls, "and the thought occurred to me, 'Why not make a meat loaf using game?
FOOD
December 4, 2002 | By George Ingram FOR THE INQUIRER
Like a ghost, an eight-point buck emerged from the morning mist. With a slow, stately gait, the deer marched uphill by a line of naked trees in a Susquehanna County field in northeastern Pennsylvania. When it appeared, I stopped breathing. I was 175 yards off, on the far side of the field. I followed the animal, then squeezed the trigger. Some call what I did that day three years ago a sport, like baseball or golf. Don't believe it. As Ted Nugent, the rock star and in-your-face nimrod put it, "This is no bird-watching walk in the woods.
NEWS
April 5, 2001
For eight weeks, sharpshooters have culled 429 deer from Fairmount Park. The huge and hungry deer population has been a threat to other plant and animal life, since their numbers far exceed the park's ability to sustain them, a fact lost on local animal-rights activists. As a public service, we provide the following recipe for venison stew: 2 lb venison 3 lg onions, coarsely chopped 2 garlic cloves, crushed 1 tb Worcestershire sauce 1 bay leaf 1 teaspoon dried oregano 7 potatoes, peeled and quartered 1 lb carrots, cut into 1-inch pieces 1/4 c all-purpose flour Heat 2 T of oil in Dutch oven.
FOOD
December 2, 1992 | by Marlialisa Calta, Special to the Daily News
It's deer season in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and elsewhere. The signs are inescapable - the pickup trucks full of men (and, occasionally, women) in bright red-and-orange clothing, the always startling sight of deer carcasses tied over fenders or slung into truckbeds, the handwritten posters in the Poconos advertising hunters' breakfasts and game suppers. I do not hunt, but I appreciate the skill of hunters and the lure of the season. And I do not hope to or want to convert those who, for whatever reason, oppose the practice.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1990 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
For Valentine's Day, how about something wild? You could rent the 1986 movie by that name and watch drab Wall Streeter Jeff Daniels get scared stiff by a kinky, handcuff-toting Melanie Griffith. Or you could opt for something tamer, like a dinner of wild boar, New Zealand venison, Canadian elk or black bear. Games or game - your choice. Since this column is not into handcuffs, you're going to read about dinner. Many area restaurants add an exotic special or two to their menus during the winter months, when game is traditionally in season, even though the products are likely to be farm-bred and available year-round.
FOOD
January 1, 2009 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What would Michael Pollan, acclaimed author of The Omnivore's Dilemma and In Defense of Food, think of Mike Marino's annual Wild Game Luncheon? Pollan has been a writer, teacher and advocate for informed, sustainable eating for about as long as Marino, a former Montgomery County district attorney (1988-99), has been hunting and cooking his own fish and game. The professorial Pollan documented the ills of agribusiness in America and its effects on our well-being, while the politically inclined Marino (R., definitely a raging R, though he voted for Barack Obama)
FOOD
January 1, 2009 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Clearing the Record This article about Michael D. Marino?s annual game luncheon incorrectly stated that Marino voted for Barack Obama. While Marino says he is  impressed with Obama, he cast his ballot for John McCain. What would Michael Pollan, acclaimed author of The Omnivore's Dilemma and In Defense of Food, think of Mike Marino's annual Wild Game Luncheon? Pollan has been a writer, teacher and advocate for informed, sustainable eating for about as long as Marino, a former Montgomery County district attorney (1988-99)
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NEWS
November 29, 2010 | By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEAR CROSS FORK, Pa. - A half-century after that first youthful kill, the deer hunter trudged once more up a familiar old trail. The lonely, wooded slopes above Beech Bottom Run lay dusted with snow Saturday afternoon as the hunter, rifle over his shoulder, scanned them for wild turkey and a defining piece of his past. At the top of the mile-long climb rose a stand of soaring, old-growth hemlocks, their trunks up to three feet wide, somehow spared from the ravenous loggers of the 1890s.
FOOD
January 1, 2009 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What would Michael Pollan, acclaimed author of The Omnivore's Dilemma and In Defense of Food, think of Mike Marino's annual Wild Game Luncheon? Pollan has been a writer, teacher and advocate for informed, sustainable eating for about as long as Marino, a former Montgomery County district attorney (1988-99), has been hunting and cooking his own fish and game. The professorial Pollan documented the ills of agribusiness in America and its effects on our well-being, while the politically inclined Marino (R., definitely a raging R, though he voted for Barack Obama)
FOOD
January 1, 2009 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Clearing the Record This article about Michael D. Marino?s annual game luncheon incorrectly stated that Marino voted for Barack Obama. While Marino says he is  impressed with Obama, he cast his ballot for John McCain. What would Michael Pollan, acclaimed author of The Omnivore's Dilemma and In Defense of Food, think of Mike Marino's annual Wild Game Luncheon? Pollan has been a writer, teacher and advocate for informed, sustainable eating for about as long as Marino, a former Montgomery County district attorney (1988-99)
NEWS
December 1, 2007
A different Pa. This is my first autumn in Philly, and I am still amazed at how different life is here from where I grew up in Northwest Pennsylvania. While most people here are recovering from Thanksgiving and focusing on the last few weeks before Christmas, my hometown is in the midst of the biggest season of the year: rifle season. At home, Thanksgiving is precursor to a weekend of preparation and camaraderie throughout thousands of deer camps in anticipation of the biggest day of the year, Buck Day (the Monday after Thanksgiving)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2007 | By STEVE FROTHINGHAM, For the Associated Press
PLYMOUTH, N.H. - When Henry Ahern's first 27 red deer ambled off the trailer and onto his grandfather's farm 13 years ago, he was just looking for a way to save the 200 acres from developers. He'd considered farming cattle, elk, bison or even fish. But when he learned that the United States imported more than 3 million pounds of deer meat a year from New Zealand, he became convinced a niche domestic market could be created. He was right. Since he started Bonnie Brae Farms, farmed venison has become a fast-growing cottage industry fueled by strong interest in the low-fat, low-cholesterol meat with all the flavor but none of the gamy bitterness of its wild cousin.
FOOD
April 19, 2007 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Over the years, I have eaten my share of venison and tasted game meats from caribou to impala to boar. So when I heard that my wife, Marianne's, grandmother was planning to roast a moose, I knew I had to wangle an invitation to broaden my experience. A few phone calls later, it was a done deal, and I began to wonder what it would taste like. Venison can be overpowering, no matter what you do to it, but the caribou I had in Quebec was sublime and the boar reminded me more of fine beef than pork.
NEWS
October 10, 2004 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Stadium Grille is aptly named. Owner Bob Batley, who developed the restaurant's concept 15 years ago, describes it as a place for grilling. "We try to find everything that we can possibly grill and go for it," Batley said recently from Stadium Grille's West Chester location, one of the restaurant's two sites. Batley counts the Grille's "Wild Side" burgers - turkey, ostrich, bison and venison - among the unconventional grilled items. There also are grilled tuna Caesar salad; grilled chicken breasts, including Cajun-style; and spicy vegetable burgers.
NEWS
January 13, 2003 | By Don Sapatkin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The hunter had been perched 20 feet up a carefully placed tree stand for perhaps 15 minutes, his bow on his lap, when a deer with huge antlers appeared. He watched, noiselessly, as the buck violently fought and slammed another big male, and then, amid raucous grunting, chased a doe into a thicket of rose bushes. Moments later, he reappeared. "He sticks his head out, and I send an arrow right through his neck," the hunter said. "He was the biggest deer I've ever seen. " The new edition of the Pope & Young Club's official Big Game Records of North America, due out this spring, will certify it as the fourth-largest whitetail deer ever taken by bow and arrow in Pennsylvania: 11 points on his antlers, an official score of 168 2/8, 226 pounds gutted.
FOOD
December 4, 2002 | By George Ingram FOR THE INQUIRER
Like a ghost, an eight-point buck emerged from the morning mist. With a slow, stately gait, the deer marched uphill by a line of naked trees in a Susquehanna County field in northeastern Pennsylvania. When it appeared, I stopped breathing. I was 175 yards off, on the far side of the field. I followed the animal, then squeezed the trigger. Some call what I did that day three years ago a sport, like baseball or golf. Don't believe it. As Ted Nugent, the rock star and in-your-face nimrod put it, "This is no bird-watching walk in the woods.
NEWS
December 3, 2001 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeff Bringhurst has never hunted a day in his life, but for him deer season has added meaning. It is called work. Bringhurst, 44, is a butcher, and, with New Jersey's six-day firearm season for deer starting today, he and the 18 or so workers at Bringhurst Meats in this Camden County township's Tansboro section will handle hundreds of deer carcasses in the days ahead. They will weigh them; tag them; skin them; cut them into roasts, steaks and chops; and turn much of the meat into sausages.
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