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Ventilation

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NEWS
February 13, 1994 | By David Rohde, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Strange things started happening in the Face-Off Circle ice skating rink on York Road last Sunday afternoon. Pee-wee hockey players started feeling dizzy and nauseous for no apparent reason. It was later discovered that the players were inhaling carbon monoxide gas that was hovering over the ice. "The rink has been open for 17 years, and this has never happened before," said Peter Pietrangelo, the rink's manager. "Everyone has their theory about where it (the gas) came from.
NEWS
April 2, 1995 | By Michelle Conlin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
There may be a reason why your head gets groggy, your eyes get scratchy, and your mood gets snappy at the end of the day - if you work in certain sections of the Montgomery County Courthouse. And why, when you return home, voila! The symptoms vanish. It may have to do with fresh air that may or may not be pouring through the equivalent of the courthouse's lungs, the ventilation system. In the last year and a half, the county Health Department has received complaints from workers in the Prothonotary's Office, the detectives' bureau, the holding-cell area, the judges' chambers zone, and the court reporters' office.
NEWS
November 23, 1994 | By Nancy Lawson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
To find the jail cells on a busy night at the Haverford Township police station, just follow your nose. And then be sure not to inhale when you arrive. "If there's someone in here who's generating some foul odors, they come out into the work area," said Sgt. John Walsh. "You get three or four people in here . . . and the odor can really get offensive," said Lt. Charles Brooks. Walsh and Brooks were attempting to speak delicately about their need for ventilation in the cell area, which is near Brooks' office and an office for patrol sergeants.
NEWS
February 5, 1994 | By Cynthia Mayer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marie Kennedy, a professor of public service, used to teach her community service classes in a drafty old downtown landmark with sash windows that slid open in summer and closed in winter. Then, 18 months ago, the University of Massachusetts at Boston moved her department onto its modern, energy-efficient campus, with airtight buildings tied to a vast internal ventilation system. Within months, she said, she and her colleagues noticed an increase in respiratory problems - colds, bronchitis, even walking pneumonia - among students and staff on campus.
NEWS
April 28, 1996 | By Wendy Greenberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Upper Moreland School District is trying to clear the air. Although tests now show there is no cause for alarm, carbon dioxide levels recently were marginally elevated in two district buildings - Upper Moreland High School and Cold Spring Elementary School - when compared to a comfort-range standard set by a national engineering society. Superintendent Paul Beck said last week that ventilation systems in the district's schools, some of which are nearly 45 years old, would be upgraded to include carbon dioxide sensors with automatic fresh-air dampers.
NEWS
April 28, 1995 | By John Way Jennings, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Twenty-three employees of a laundry in South Camden were rushed to area hospitals yesterday morning after being overcome by chemical fumes inside the facility. Authorities said all but one of the victims were treated and released. A woman who suffered irritation to her lungs was hospitalized last night. Her identity was not immediately available. Investigators said the incident occurred shortly before 8 a.m. at the Hospital Central Services Cooperative in the 2200 block of South Broadway.
NEWS
December 7, 1986 | By Christine M. Johnson, Special to The Inquirer
After repairs to the ventilation system at a district building failed to clear the air about health concerns, officials have asked a federal agency to test the air at the Central Bucks East High School. During a meeting Thursday morning, school officials and teachers from Central Bucks East discussed their concerns. They also reviewed a letter, sent Monday to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), which requested a health-hazard evaluation of the building in Buckingham Township, according to district business manager Gene P. Abel.
FOOD
February 14, 1990 | By Morris and James Carey, Special to the Daily News
Q. I have condensation on my ceilings. I also recently discovered mildew at the wall near the floor in a couple of bedrooms. I keep a clean house, but am concerned I might be doing something wrong. A. If you investigate further you probably will find that you also have condensation in your attic and that the crawl space under the house is damp. This is not poor housekeeping, but a classic case of poor or nonexistent ventilation. Attic and foundation vents provide an access between interior and exterior spaces.
NEWS
May 19, 1993 | By James Cordrey, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Seven students at the Sacred Heart School in the Swedesburg section of Upper Merion were treated at Sacred Heart Hospital in Norristown yesterday after paint fumes forced the closing of the school, said officials at the Swedesburg Fire Company. The school, at Fourth and Stewart Streets, was evacuated about 11:30 a.m. when students became ill because of fumes from paint that was being used on a freezer in the basement, said Swedesburg Fire Chief Stan Leszczynski. Five girls and two boys, ages 8 to 14, were treated for nausea, sore throats and upset stomachs, a Sacred Heart Hospital spokeswoman said.
LIVING
August 5, 2005 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: We live in a 72-year-old stone-and-stucco house. We had termite treatment performed seven years ago, and annual inspection failed to uncover new infestations. However, there is repair work that needs to be done, and we want to know that we are being given the correct recommendations as we obtain estimates. The damage includes the headers of two ground-level basement windows and three beams. What would be the proper way to repair this damage? Answer: Without knowing the extent of the damage, it's hard to make a recommendation.
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NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Emily Damuth and Stephen Trzeciak, critical-care specialists at Cooper University Hospital, would like to be able to tell patients what their lives will be like if they choose to stay on a breathing machine for more than a couple of weeks. There's just one problem: The doctors don't know. Trzeciak said intensive-care unit physicians like him rarely see their patients again once they leave the hospital. What happens after the ICU heroics is a "black box" for them, he said. He and Damuth found that frustrating enough that they led a study that looked at what happens to patients in the United States and other countries who get mechanical ventilation for more than two weeks.
REAL_ESTATE
December 22, 2013 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
Remodeling a bathroom? Consider which features it's missing now. The older your house, the more MIAs there will be. Bob Bowman and John Matusik Jr., the "B & M" of B & M Custom Carpentry in West Deptford, generally work on older South Jersey homes. So in their upgrades, exhaust fans are a priority. Even if a bathroom has one, it often doesn't work well. "We like to put them in-line, from the room, through the ductwork, into the attic, into the fan, then outside," said Matusik.
NEWS
July 21, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 7-year-old boy hospitalized in critical condition after being discovered underwater in a city pool in West Philadelphia was being kept alive on a ventilator Friday night, police said. Police earlier had reported that the boy had been pronounced dead at 5:53 p.m. at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Police later said that report was incorrect. The boy, whose name has not been released, was part of a summer camp program for children of homeless families receiving shelter from Families Forward Philadelphia in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 29, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
More than 14 months after Mayor Nutter opened the President's House memorial as "a living story for us to impart to our children," more often than not those children have been greeted by blank, lifeless video screens. The glass canopy enclosing archaeological remains of the nation's first executive mansion, where George Washington and John Adams conducted their presidencies and where Washington held nine enslaved Africans, has repeatedly leaked and fogged up. Atmospheric controls within the enclosure have been tweaked repeatedly as destructive moisture built up within.
NEWS
June 2, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
A sulfur-like smell drove students from Paulsboro High School this morning. Students were moved outside, not sent home, for less than an hour, while the school was ventilated. "They were evacuated because the smell on the outside was less than the smell in the building," explained district superintendent Frank Scambia. They returned by about 9:30 to finish a full day of classes, he said. Investigators were continuing to try to determine the source of the smell. A police lieutenant, who compared the odor to rotten eggs, said the problem was sulfur dioxide released from a nearby oil refinery.
NEWS
June 19, 2007
The Pennsylvania Senate is poised to act soon on a far-reaching public-health measure - a statewide smoke-free law - that, literally, will save lives. Along the way to reaching agreement, senators should avoid the temptation to cut political deals that punch the workplace smoking ban full of loopholes. That would be like deciding who gets to live and who dies - something best left to a higher power. Unfortunately, there are upwards of 20 amendments floating around the General Assembly.
NEWS
April 21, 2007 | By Jennifer Moroz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Corzine finally is breathing on his own. His doctors took him off a ventilator just past noon yesterday, a Corzine spokesman said, more than a week after the serious car wreck that left him with 10 broken ribs, a snapped thigh bone, and a fractured breastbone, collarbone and vertebra. "His respiratory function will be closely monitored to ensure that he can continue to breathe on his own and cough efficiently," said spokesman Anthony Coley. "Doctors do not entirely rule out the possibility that the breathing tube will need to be reinserted.
LIVING
November 10, 2006 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: Our crawl space is 3 1/2 feet high, under the living room, dining room and kitchen. A waterproofing company installed a sump pump, and the ground is covered with plastic to reduce moisture. We have no insulation under the floor in this crawl space, and I have had different versions of the best way to go. Answer: I've turned to the U.S. Department of Energy for recommendations; it says that how one insulates a crawl space depends on whether the space is ventilated or unventilated.
NEWS
August 30, 2005
TO THOSE who felt that, on his recent smoking tour, Mayor Street was overlooking the "fact" that bar business will improve after a ban and that ventilation won't work, I offer two notes. New York Mayor Bloomberg has been challenged repeatedly to prove he's not lying about the economic effects of New York's ban. How could he prove that? Simply repeal the ban and let the world see businesses keep their bans in place voluntarily to retain the hordes of nonsmokers now hanging out in the bars.
LIVING
August 5, 2005 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: We live in a 72-year-old stone-and-stucco house. We had termite treatment performed seven years ago, and annual inspection failed to uncover new infestations. However, there is repair work that needs to be done, and we want to know that we are being given the correct recommendations as we obtain estimates. The damage includes the headers of two ground-level basement windows and three beams. What would be the proper way to repair this damage? Answer: Without knowing the extent of the damage, it's hard to make a recommendation.
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