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Ventriloquist

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NEWS
December 20, 1989 | Special to The Inquirer / MARK STEIN
AT THE GLOUCESTER COUNTY Children's Christmas Party, Snugles the Clown, left, performs a magic act. At right, Mr. and Mrs. Claus listen to Andrew Lime of Williamstown, who will turn 2 on Christmas Day. The party was held Sunday at Auletto Caterers. Lunch was served, and the children were entertained by a puppet show, clowns and magic acts, and a ventriloquist.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2006 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You'll find plenty of dummies on Broadway these days, and for a change, they're not all in producers' offices. Many are actually on stage. They take over the Helen Hayes Theatre with such natural presence and impeccable timing, it's hard to tell who's real - them or their ventriloquist, Jay Johnson. Johnson is a master at an art often relegated to kids' diversions, when it's noticed at all nowadays. In Jay Johnson: The Two and Only! he celebrates ventriloquism with such grace, enthusiasm and dazzling talent, only a real dummy could resist.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | By Julia M. Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Six-year-old Rhiannon Scherer was getting no respect from "Mr. Cup. " So she laid down the law. "You know, you can be recycled," she said. Nick Pawlow did his sparring with a headless dummy. "Would you like to buy a hat? I'll sell it to you cheap," the dummy offered. These performers - and their temporarily animate friends - were among the hits of the 16th Annual International Ventriloquist Convention, a four-day gathering crammed with intentionally wooden humor, bad and ancient puns and puppets so lifelike they forced repeated double-takes.
NEWS
May 3, 1989 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
The barbarism of the Holocaust is measured by more than the body count. Notice must also be taken of the appalling, irremediable injuries inflicted on the spirits of the living by Nazi persecution. Joshua Sobol's play Ghetto does both. A massacre of Jews precedes the action and another ends it. In between, the drama focuses on a chapter in ghetto life in one of its most remarkable historic manifestations. The production, which opened Sunday and is mounted by the Circle in the Square Theater uptown with a large cast, is only partly successful in conveying a sense of tragedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2013 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Death by whimsy: not a pretty way to go. Idiopathic Ridiculopathy Consortium's unbearably cloying production of Paradise Park bludgeons us for 85 very long minutes with cliche after cliche, as adolescent philosophizing monologues alternate with inane dance sequences and pointless pratfalls. Written by Charles Mee, a prolific and undeservedly popular contemporary playwright, Paradise Park takes place in a Disneyland of the mind: you can go to England, or the beach, or the Grand Canyon, or the back porch, or the forest, or etc. etc. etc. Could this be a metaphor?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1996 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
A ventriloquist's desperate relationship with his 8-foot-tall dummy and a choreographer's humorous take on his art are the highlights of Festival of New Performance II, four short new theater pieces performed at the Painted Bride Art Center. The other two works on the program - sponsored by the Bride, the Philadelphia Dramatist Center and the Brick Playhouse - can't even be described as lowlights. They have no luster whatosoever. A dark comedy about a twisted partnership between a ventriloquist and his seemingly alive dummy is not an original idea.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1994 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
To fully appreciate Borscht Capades '94, it helps to have been familiar with, say, Borscht Capades '55, or the version of the show from some other year in that decade, but it's not really essential. The show at the Merriam is a lively, nicely performed entertainment that can be enjoyed by anybody. I say that at the outset because when I describe Borscht Capades '94, it won't sound like a show that will interest the average theatergoer. Borscht Capades '94 is singer/actor Joel Grey's valentine to his father, Mickey Katz, a musician and novelty singer who created the Borscht Capades in the late 1940s and periodically toured with it into the 1960s.
NEWS
December 29, 2000 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Bobby Burnett will sing the songs made famous by Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett and Bobby Darin at Bristol Borough's First Night celebration on New Year's Eve. Burnett will be joined Sunday by a ventriloquist and puppet show, an acoustic-guitar act known as Uncle Brother, and an eclectic array of other attractions, such as Charlie Zahm, the Fairmount Brass Quartet, and the Philadelphia Gospel Choir. Throughout the evening, music productions, dance performances and magic shows will be held at the Bristol Riverside Theater on Radcliff Street.
NEWS
January 27, 1989 | By Bill Kent, Special to the Daily News
Atlantic City is warming up its winter months with a slew of so-called "hot" revues: flesh, feathers and big-hairdo shows in which pop tunes, racy choreography, a few specialty acts and revealing costumes just might take your mind off the winter weather. "Beehive" at Harrah's, Resorts' "Wildfire" and Caesars' "High Voltage" have one thing in common: they both take as their inspiration pop songs from the 1960s onward. In fact, all three shows feature a Diana Ross & the Supremes spoof.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1986 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
If cutups and kooks are your interest, Margaret Baker can oblige. Baker will star in a one-woman theatrical comedy titled Cutting Up at 9 tonight and tomorrow at the North Star Bar, 27th and Poplar Streets. In Cutting Up, Baker presents a parade of 10 characters, whose buffoonery ranges from the strange to the hilarious. Admission $4. Information: 235-7827. More news on the comedy front: This weekend, the No Respect for the Human Condition Players wrap up a five-month run upstairs at P.J. Moriarty's, 1116 Walnut St. - and next weekend they take up residence at Grendel's Lair Cabaret Theater, 500 South St. Shows at Moriarty's will be tonight and tomorrow night at 8:30; tickets cost $7. Information: 627-9715.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2013 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Death by whimsy: not a pretty way to go. Idiopathic Ridiculopathy Consortium's unbearably cloying production of Paradise Park bludgeons us for 85 very long minutes with cliche after cliche, as adolescent philosophizing monologues alternate with inane dance sequences and pointless pratfalls. Written by Charles Mee, a prolific and undeservedly popular contemporary playwright, Paradise Park takes place in a Disneyland of the mind: you can go to England, or the beach, or the Grand Canyon, or the back porch, or the forest, or etc. etc. etc. Could this be a metaphor?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2006 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You'll find plenty of dummies on Broadway these days, and for a change, they're not all in producers' offices. Many are actually on stage. They take over the Helen Hayes Theatre with such natural presence and impeccable timing, it's hard to tell who's real - them or their ventriloquist, Jay Johnson. Johnson is a master at an art often relegated to kids' diversions, when it's noticed at all nowadays. In Jay Johnson: The Two and Only! he celebrates ventriloquism with such grace, enthusiasm and dazzling talent, only a real dummy could resist.
NEWS
December 29, 2000 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Bobby Burnett will sing the songs made famous by Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett and Bobby Darin at Bristol Borough's First Night celebration on New Year's Eve. Burnett will be joined Sunday by a ventriloquist and puppet show, an acoustic-guitar act known as Uncle Brother, and an eclectic array of other attractions, such as Charlie Zahm, the Fairmount Brass Quartet, and the Philadelphia Gospel Choir. Throughout the evening, music productions, dance performances and magic shows will be held at the Bristol Riverside Theater on Radcliff Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1996 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
A ventriloquist's desperate relationship with his 8-foot-tall dummy and a choreographer's humorous take on his art are the highlights of Festival of New Performance II, four short new theater pieces performed at the Painted Bride Art Center. The other two works on the program - sponsored by the Bride, the Philadelphia Dramatist Center and the Brick Playhouse - can't even be described as lowlights. They have no luster whatosoever. A dark comedy about a twisted partnership between a ventriloquist and his seemingly alive dummy is not an original idea.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1994 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
To fully appreciate Borscht Capades '94, it helps to have been familiar with, say, Borscht Capades '55, or the version of the show from some other year in that decade, but it's not really essential. The show at the Merriam is a lively, nicely performed entertainment that can be enjoyed by anybody. I say that at the outset because when I describe Borscht Capades '94, it won't sound like a show that will interest the average theatergoer. Borscht Capades '94 is singer/actor Joel Grey's valentine to his father, Mickey Katz, a musician and novelty singer who created the Borscht Capades in the late 1940s and periodically toured with it into the 1960s.
NEWS
March 5, 1993 | by Ann Gerhart, Daily News Staff Writer
How nice is Shari Lewis, mother of Lamb Chop, descendant of Peter Pan, owner of an Emmy and an entertainment empire that doesn't end, but just goes on and on, my friends? She's so nice that she doesn't mind, at 59, being called "perky," an adjective applied to her at least once in every article ever written about her. "I have a high energy level," she allows. She's so nice that she doesn't nag her only child, 30-year-old Mallory, for grandchildren, although goodness knows when she'd find the time for them.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | By Julia M. Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Six-year-old Rhiannon Scherer was getting no respect from "Mr. Cup. " So she laid down the law. "You know, you can be recycled," she said. Nick Pawlow did his sparring with a headless dummy. "Would you like to buy a hat? I'll sell it to you cheap," the dummy offered. These performers - and their temporarily animate friends - were among the hits of the 16th Annual International Ventriloquist Convention, a four-day gathering crammed with intentionally wooden humor, bad and ancient puns and puppets so lifelike they forced repeated double-takes.
NEWS
December 20, 1989 | Special to The Inquirer / MARK STEIN
AT THE GLOUCESTER COUNTY Children's Christmas Party, Snugles the Clown, left, performs a magic act. At right, Mr. and Mrs. Claus listen to Andrew Lime of Williamstown, who will turn 2 on Christmas Day. The party was held Sunday at Auletto Caterers. Lunch was served, and the children were entertained by a puppet show, clowns and magic acts, and a ventriloquist.
NEWS
May 3, 1989 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
The barbarism of the Holocaust is measured by more than the body count. Notice must also be taken of the appalling, irremediable injuries inflicted on the spirits of the living by Nazi persecution. Joshua Sobol's play Ghetto does both. A massacre of Jews precedes the action and another ends it. In between, the drama focuses on a chapter in ghetto life in one of its most remarkable historic manifestations. The production, which opened Sunday and is mounted by the Circle in the Square Theater uptown with a large cast, is only partly successful in conveying a sense of tragedy.
NEWS
January 27, 1989 | By Bill Kent, Special to the Daily News
Atlantic City is warming up its winter months with a slew of so-called "hot" revues: flesh, feathers and big-hairdo shows in which pop tunes, racy choreography, a few specialty acts and revealing costumes just might take your mind off the winter weather. "Beehive" at Harrah's, Resorts' "Wildfire" and Caesars' "High Voltage" have one thing in common: they both take as their inspiration pop songs from the 1960s onward. In fact, all three shows feature a Diana Ross & the Supremes spoof.
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