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Venture Capitalists

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BUSINESS
March 8, 1992 | By Jeff Brown, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Philip Behr goes looking to invest in U.S. companies, he doesn't look for cutting-edge electronics makers or promising biotech firms. Instead, this private-equity capitalist goes after manufacturers of mining equipment, prison locks and, yes, toothpicks. Not much pizazz, he admits, but they're able to produce rates of return of more than 60 percent a year. "In one way or another we try to rejuvenate them," said Behr of Advent International Corp., of Boston. "We're looking for tired, old companies.
NEWS
June 10, 1993 | By GEORGE F. WILL
At the Cato Institute, a libertarian think tank in Washington, a recent lecturer drolly introduced himself in language fashionable in Clinton's Washington: "I am an excess of the 1980s. " He is T.J. Rodgers, president and CEO of Cypress Semiconductor, which he founded 10 years ago with one used computer and no other employee. He is one of those who, in Clinton's words, "profited most from the uneven prosperity of the last decade. " (A question: What would "even" prosperity look like?
BUSINESS
February 12, 2002 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Also in this column: Glenmede shake-up Free check images Greco's governance tips Investors have almost stopped giving venture capitalists more money. But the venture masters aren't selling their fancy cars or beach homes just yet. They have many billions left over from the dot-com years, when pension funds, corporations and wealthy families lined up to make "alternative investments" designed to beat the stock market. With venture funds writing off losses from defunct Internet and telecom companies, new investments in venture capital dropped to less than $5 billion in the last quarter of 2001, from a peak of $31 billion in the second quarter of 2000, according to the latest numbers from the National Venture Capital Association.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2012 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
A Harvard Business School lecturer told the Wall Street Journal earlier this year venture capitalists "bury their dead quietly. " He was talking about the large numbers of their investments that fail - up to three-quarters of all venture-backed start-ups, according to his research. Needless to say, the courtship phase between entrepreneur and investor is far more lively. Take this week, filled as it is with events bringing idea people together with money men. (With few exceptions, they're almost all money men)
BUSINESS
June 8, 2002 | By Porus P. Cooper INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Howard E. Lubert, who checks out promising technologies for venture capitalists who want to invest in them, scanned yesterday's gathering and noted: "There's a lot of money under management in this room. " Indeed there was. There were Lubert's brother, Ira M. Lubert, whose venture funds have invested about $2 billion in real estate, biotechnology and other companies; Lindsay A. Rosenwald, of Paramount Capital, who has funneled about $300 million into biotechnology firms; David J. Freschman, whose Delaware Innovation Fund has sown about $10 million in early-stage funding for information technology and other ventures; and many others.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2008 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The slowing economy is taking a toll on venture-capital spending for young start-up companies, according to a quarterly survey. Venture capitalists were more cautious in the first quarter this year, investing $7.1 billion nationally in 922 deals. That was down 8.5 percent from the fourth quarter, when $7.8 billion was invested in 1,045 deals. In the Philadelphia area, deals and dollars were actually up in the first three months of this year - $173.4 million went to 21 companies, compared with $67.1 million and 13 deals in the fourth quarter of 2007.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1991 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Imagine investing in a company without any revenue, let alone profits. Without a manager or business plan. Without customers or even a product. Imagine that the only thing going for this enterprise is a concept that might lead to a real business with all of the above. Then imagine what it is like to be a venture capitalist in the biotech field. It's a long-shot, high-risk, long-haul investment specialty in which the goal is to take an idea from laboratory to marketplace.
BUSINESS
October 12, 1994 | By Dan Stets, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jennifer Barclay froze for a moment in doubt as she stood before the mirror in a lady's room at the Four Seasons Hotel yesterday. In minutes she was to make her presentation to the Mid-Atlantic Venture Fair, an annual matchmaking confab of venture capitalists and entrepreneurs. "Should I wear the hat? Should I risk being myself?" the 27-year-old art- school dropout asked herself. She had been told to wear a dark suit, but she rejected that idea, preferring to wear the distinctive "funky" garments made by her own firm, Blue Fish Clothing Inc., of Frenchtown, N.J. Barclay donned four layers of garb; three in subtle shades of green, the fourth a skirt in a burnt orange.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2001 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the race to find, develop and market new medicines, Locus Discovery Inc. says it has a Porsche while everyone else is stuck driving minivans. Using one of the world's most powerful computer clusters, the Blue Bell biotechnology company said it can compress years of medical research into weeks or months. "This is nothing short of a paradigm shift in drug discovery," said Nicholas Landekic, Locus' president and chief executive officer. "This makes obsolete many previous approaches to drug discovery.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2002 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Any life-sciences company grown in the Biotechnology Greenhouse of Southeastern Pennsylvania would be considered a start-up firm. As such it would face long odds in winning some of the millions of dollars invested by venture capitalists in biotechnology and other life sciences in this region every year. And more than likely it will face the critical eye of Elaine V. Jones. A vice president of S.R. One Ltd. in West Conshohocken, Jones is one of the few venture capitalists in the Philadelphia area who specialize in investing in biotech and other medical technologies.
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BUSINESS
August 9, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Venture capitalist Bruce Luehrs , who weighed startups and pitched investors for Princeton's pioneering Edison Venture Fund back in the dot-com boom, is back on the road. He says he wishes he had more competitors. "We're an honest-to-God Philadelphia early-stage venture fund," Luehrs told me about his latest pile, $18 million Rittenhouse Ventures II , which includes $4 million in funding from state sources and Ben Franklin Technology Partners. Rittenhouse Ventures I is the current name for the 2008 fund formerly known as Emerald Stage2 Ventures , which Luehrs started in 2008 with partner Saul Richter , backing from Joe Besecker 's Emerald Asset Management , and millions more in state funding.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
Hey there, entrepreneurs: Ready for your UberPitch moment? Folks with a great notion and a need for cash will have a golden opportunity on Friday - tied to Philly Tech Week - to pitch to one of the top local venture capitalists in a spontaneous one-on-one session inside a comfy Uber SUV cruising round town. The window of opportunity will be open from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. to participants in Center City, University City, Old City, North Third, Northern Liberties, and Fishtown, and for Temple campus folks from 1 to 3 p.m. Because this flash pitch is being promoted by the ride-sharing service, access is limited to those who have Uber accounts set up on mobile phones - though participation is free.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2016
Has America's job market broken? Are we becoming a nation of part-timers? Of underemployed young people and can't-afford-to-be-retirees stitching together low-wage workweeks? That's one view of a "gig economy," in which - except for company owners - all our cars are taxis, our homes are hotels, and none of our weekly hours qualifies for company benefits. So we have to buy high-deductible health plans on the not-so-free market? "Gig work reflects the more flexible or fragmented work arrangements of many in today's labor market," namely Uber and Lyft drivers, TaskRabbit "freelance laborers," Upwork free-lancers, and Etsy salespeople, writes John Silvia, the Pennsylvania native who serves as chief economist at Wells Fargo & Co., in a recent report on the "gig" economy.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Venture capitalists invested $420.3 million in Philadelphia-area companies last year, up 1.2 percent from the year before, according to the MoneyTree Report by PricewaterhouseCoopers L.L.P. and the National Venture Capital Association. The report, released Friday and based on data from Thomson Reuters, also showed that venture capitalists nationally invested $29.4 billion in 3,995 deals, a 7 percent increase in dollars and a 4 percent increase in deals. Locally, the number of companies receiving venture capital equity investments increased 9.9 percent to 122 from 111. In the fourth quarter, 34 Philadelphia-area companies received $81.6 million in investments.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2013 | By Barbara Ortutay, Associated Press
A new study shows that funding for business start-ups declined in 2012, the first time that has happened in three years, as venture capitalists spent less on fewer deals. Capital-intense sectors such as clean technology and life sciences were among the hardest hit, according to a MoneyTree study released Friday that was conducted by PriceWaterHouseCoopers and the National Venture Capital Association, based on data from Thomson Reuters. In all of 2012, start-up investments fell 10 percent, to $26.52 billion from $29.46 billion, the study found.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2013 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
For everyone salivating over the prospect of more seed funding becoming available to Philadelphia entrepreneurs in 2013, allow me to serve up a plate of "Series A crunch. " That's not some type of granola or candy bar. It's a recent investment-industry phenomenon that will amount to a rude awakening for many businesses that raised seed funding in the last 18 months: There may be no follow-on financing for you. That has long been true for businesses that start with capital provided by founders and family and later attract the attention and financial support from a wealthy individual ("angel investor")
BUSINESS
December 4, 2012 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
A Harvard Business School lecturer told the Wall Street Journal earlier this year venture capitalists "bury their dead quietly. " He was talking about the large numbers of their investments that fail - up to three-quarters of all venture-backed start-ups, according to his research. Needless to say, the courtship phase between entrepreneur and investor is far more lively. Take this week, filled as it is with events bringing idea people together with money men. (With few exceptions, they're almost all money men)
BUSINESS
September 24, 2012
"It is beyond belief that there are still people who would trade this progress for a return to the status quo. " - Gov. Corbett, referring to opponents of drilling for shale gas, in remarks at the Marcellus Shale Coalition convention in Center City. "I think it is disingenuous for the governor to dismiss his opponents as a fringe element of naysayers. " - David Masur of PennEnvironment, protesting outside the shale-gas convention.   "We are really, really sad. I hope they call us back because these are really, really good jobs.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
"No person except a natural born citizen, or a citizen of the United States, at the time of the adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the office of President; neither shall any person be eligible to that office who shall not have attained to the age of thirty-five years" - U.S. Constitution, Article II, Section 1 By John E. Sununu The Constitution may be the foundation of American democracy, but the qualifications...
NEWS
October 13, 2011 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, INQUIRER POLITICS WRITER
Steve Welch, a Chester County entrepreneur who built a successful biotechnology company, launched a bid for the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate Thursday, saying the nation needs leaders who "understand the economy from the ground up. " He joins a growing field of at least eight candidates looking to replace Sen. Bob Casey (D., Pa.) by tying the incumbent to President Obama and the nation's economic problems. "American innovation is strong," Welch, 36, said Thursday in an interview.
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