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Venus And Serena

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SPORTS
June 20, 2011 | Associated Press
Two simple words at the end of a June 7 tweet said it all: "Serena's back!" And Venus is, too. Yes, as Serena Williams announced to the world less than two weeks ago, the most successful tennis-playing siblings in history are returning from lengthy layoffs right on time for Wimbledon, where they just so happen to have won nine of the past 11 singles championships. For Serena, it will be her first Grand Slam tournament - and only second event - since she took home a second consecutive title from the All England Club in July 2010.
NEWS
July 11, 2002
CHRIS EVERT said that when the Williams sisters play each other, it is always over in "two sets," as if they should actually have to drag it out for it to be believable. What jealousy! If it is "boring" that Venus and Serena are the best in the world, their competitors should just beat them on the court instead of making ignorant statements. We the public never get tired of seeing the best. Patsy Williams, Philadelphia
SPORTS
July 10, 2000 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
People don't have to be tennis fans to know how significant Venus Williams' conquering of Wimbledon is. Williams' 6-3, 7-6 (7-3) dethroning of Lindsay Davenport in an all-American final on Saturday was historic for several reasons: Venus is the first African-American woman since Althea Gibson in 1958 to win a Wimbledon title. Venus and Serena become first sisters to earn Grand Slam tournament titles. Serena is the defending U.S. Open champion. Fifth-seeded Venus was the lowest seed of any female player to win Wimbledon since No. 8 Karen Hantze Susman won in 1962.
SPORTS
May 24, 1998 | By Diane Pucin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Martina Hingis is on a big billboard on I-95 in Northeast Philadelphia. Anna Kournikova is featured in People magazine as one of the world's 50 most beautiful people. Venus and Serena Williams caused more chaos in a hotel lobby during the NBA all-star weekend than Michael Jordan and Kobe Bryant. Tennis is sizzling again. Tennis has buzz again. As the summer season of Grand Slam tournaments begins tomorrow with the French Open in Paris, the average sports fan is rediscovering the game.
SPORTS
September 19, 2000 | by Bill Conlin, Daily News Sports Columnist
CBS tennis analyst John McEnroe writes a column for London's Sunday Telegraph. The logo should read: "Footprints on My Tongue. " The Hall of Famer ripped the Williams sisters, Venus and Serena, during his U.S. Open commentaries on both the USA Network and CBS. Now, he has turned up the volume - and level of vitriol - in a column that ran almost on the eve of the Olympic tennis competition, where Venus will play singles and the sisters will...
SPORTS
July 2, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
One glance at the data displayed on those fancy, new digital scoreboards at staid, old Wimbledon yesterday provided a persuasive case for why Venus Williams might be considered the woman to beat. The entry under career record at the grass-court Grand Slam: "55-7. " The listing of her best result: "WINNER 2007, 2005, 2001, 2000. " Yet another reason to like the seventh-seeded Venus' chances is the way she served during the 6-4, 6-3 quarterfinal victory over Tamarine Tanasugarn - smacking eight aces, saving nine of the 10 break points, tying her Wimbledon record with a 127 mph delivery.
NEWS
July 6, 2000 | By Ashley McGeachy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They are the sisters Williams, Venus Ebone Starr and Serena, and today they will meet in the semifinals of the most prestigious tournament in tennis: Wimbledon. The All England Club, polite and notoriously proper, will be buzzing when they take Centre Court. Fulfilling the prophecy of their coach and father, Richard, fifth-seeded Venus and eighth-seeded Serena have vaulted to center stage. Their overpowering ground strokes, superior conditioning, and booming serves routinely make their opponents appear inadequately fit, even weak.
SPORTS
June 28, 1997 | By Diane Pucin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Already, Venus Williams has been threatened with losing points if she loses her beads. Williams, the 17-year-old American who wears in her braided hair bright beads that go clackety-clack with every swing of her tennis racket, is still waiting to make her much-anticipated Wimbledon debut. But if her beads fall out, watch out. For the first time since 1909, Wimbledon has been rained out on two consecutive days, so Williams' inaugural Wimbledon match has been postponed again.
NEWS
November 10, 1997 | By Diane Pucin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Open finalist, a tall, regal 17-year-old with braces on her teeth, has just finished an early-morning practice with her 16-year-old sister. There are giggles galore and some disagreement about who will go to the vending machine for a candy bar when the imposing man with the deep voice, the backward baseball cap, and the eyes that see everything stops them cold. "Pick up those tennis balls," Richard Williams says, waving a hand at the two dozen scattered balls. Venus Williams, the elder sister, the one who charmed America and made it to the finals of her first U.S. Open in September, rolls her eyes and seems ready to make some smart-mouthed, teenage comment.
SPORTS
September 10, 1998 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
They arrived on the women's tennis circuit like an overhead smash. They are the Williamses, and they are proud. Venus Williams, 18, is in the U.S. Open semifinals after an astounding run to the finals last year in her Open debut. A year ago, Venus was unseeded; this year, she is seeded fifth and headed into a matchup tomorrow against No. 2 seed Lindsay Davenport in the Arthur Ashe Stadium at the U.S. Tennis Association National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadow. Serena, who turns 17 Sept.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2014
THE STORY of how Venus and Serena Williams' father fought off drug dealers so that he could train his daughters on decrepit, drug-infested tennis courts in Compton, Calif., is almost legendary. But what do we really know about Richard Williams, the man? At 72, he's a controversial figure in the world of tennis. Now he has a new book, Black and White: The Way I See It , that shares his life story as well as tips on raising successful children. But don't buy it thinking it's a tell-all.
SPORTS
July 26, 2012 | Associated Press
Goalkeeper Hope Solo said the antsy U.S. women's soccer players are ready to "unleash the beast. " The Americans open their Olympic campaign on Wednesday with a game against France in Scotland, two days before the opening ceremony. Soccer is one of two sports that starts early because the extra days are needed to play a sufficient slate of games that doesn't wear the players out. Women's soccer isn't much of a draw in Scotland. Some 37,000 fans are expected for Wednesday's game, but organizers say about 80 percent of the tickets were given away to schools and local clubs.
SPORTS
April 6, 2012
Venus Williams kept up with sister Serena by winning a third-round match Thursday in the Family Circle Cup, moving one step closer to an all-Williams semifinal in Charleston, S.C. Venus defeated Anastasia Rodionova of Russia, 7-5, 6-2, continuing her strong comeback from an autoimmune disease that sidelined her for more than six months. Serena also advanced to the quarterfinals, ousting Marina Erakovic of New Zealand, 6-2, 6-2. France captain Guy Forget picked Gilles Simon , who has a sore back, to play against John Isner of the United States in the Davis Cup quarterfinals.
SPORTS
June 20, 2011 | Associated Press
Two simple words at the end of a June 7 tweet said it all: "Serena's back!" And Venus is, too. Yes, as Serena Williams announced to the world less than two weeks ago, the most successful tennis-playing siblings in history are returning from lengthy layoffs right on time for Wimbledon, where they just so happen to have won nine of the past 11 singles championships. For Serena, it will be her first Grand Slam tournament - and only second event - since she took home a second consecutive title from the All England Club in July 2010.
SPORTS
July 2, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
One glance at the data displayed on those fancy, new digital scoreboards at staid, old Wimbledon yesterday provided a persuasive case for why Venus Williams might be considered the woman to beat. The entry under career record at the grass-court Grand Slam: "55-7. " The listing of her best result: "WINNER 2007, 2005, 2001, 2000. " Yet another reason to like the seventh-seeded Venus' chances is the way she served during the 6-4, 6-3 quarterfinal victory over Tamarine Tanasugarn - smacking eight aces, saving nine of the 10 break points, tying her Wimbledon record with a 127 mph delivery.
SPORTS
September 8, 2002 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The older sister had given an accurate scouting report, talking from her own experience about how easy it is to play well after you have won a couple of Grand Slam titles, about how you feel like you can do anything. In the U.S. Open final last night, Serena Williams dominated the older sister, Venus, much the way she had dominated lesser talents outside the family. Right now, she is taking her place among the dominating figures in all of sports. Playing a cleaner game than her sister in front of a packed house at Arthur Ashe Stadium, Serena won, 6-4, 6-3, for her third consecutive Grand Slam title, beating Venus sister for the third straight time.
NEWS
July 11, 2002
CHRIS EVERT said that when the Williams sisters play each other, it is always over in "two sets," as if they should actually have to drag it out for it to be believable. What jealousy! If it is "boring" that Venus and Serena are the best in the world, their competitors should just beat them on the court instead of making ignorant statements. We the public never get tired of seeing the best. Patsy Williams, Philadelphia
SPORTS
June 9, 2002 | By Sandra Harwitt FOR THE INQUIRER
For what was undoubtedly the first time in Grand Slam history, the losing finalist joined a large corps of professional photographers to snap a few candid photos of the newly crowned French Open tennis champion beaming proudly with the trophy. That's true sportsmanship. And that's how the Williams family raised Venus and Serena to behave. Win or lose. Venus Williams finished second yesterday to younger sister Serena, who couldn't hide her excitement after a 7-5, 6-3 victory at the premier clay-court tournament in the world.
SPORTS
June 8, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
For the first time in their eight-match history, Serena Williams will be favored to win over her older sister, Venus, in the women's final at the French Open. Throw out the rankings, which on Monday will read Venus No. 1 and Serena No. 2. They are, in reality, 1A and 1B, with Jennifer Capriati a close but distinct third. Who gets the A and who gets the B will be decided today (Channel 10, 11 a.m.). Part of the reason Serena is favored is her emotionally significant win over Venus in the semifinals at the Nasdaq-100 Open in March.
SPORTS
September 9, 2001 | By Ashley McGeachy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
She moved the red racket bag and took a seat beside her little sister moments after crushing her dream. With her 6-2, 6-4 victory having enabled her to to repeat as U.S. Open champion, Venus Williams transformed from unforgiving foe to sympathetic sibling. Reflecting on a crucial point, Venus asked Serena about a double fault that had given her a 5-4 lead in the second set, allowing her to serve for the match. "The wind kicked up, didn't it?" Venus said. It was a warm moment, a gesture of support, of friendship, of caring.
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